Вариант № 33234 1. A 1 № 1344. Вы услышите

Образовательный портал «РЕШУ ЕГЭ» (http://английский.решуегэ.рф)
Вариант № 33234
1. A 1 № 1344. Вы услышите диалог дважды. Определите, является ли следующее утверждение верным, или
не ​вер ​ным, или о нем нет ин​фор ​ма ​ции.
Every year Betsy spends the New Year abroad.
1) True
2) False
3) Not stated
2. A 2 № 1345. Вы услышите диалог дважды. Определите, является ли следующее утверждение верным, или
не ​вер ​ным, или о нем нет ин​фор ​ма ​ции.
Betsy thinks that the trip was not worth the money.
1) True
2) False
3) Not stated
3. A 3 № 1346. Вы услышите диалог дважды. Определите, является ли следующее утверждение верным, или
не ​вер ​ным, или о нем нет ин​фор ​ма ​ции.
There is an active volcano on the island.
1) True
2) False
3) Not stated
4. A 4 № 1347. Вы услышите диалог дважды. Определите, является ли следующее утверждение верным, или
не ​вер ​ным, или о нем нет ин​фор ​ма ​ции.
Betsy led an active life on the island.
1) True
2) False
3) Not stated
5. A 5 № 1348. Вы услышите диалог дважды. Определите, является ли следующее утверждение верным, или
не ​вер ​ным, или о нем нет ин​фор ​ма ​ции.
The zoo had more than a hundred species of wild birds.
1) True
2) False
3) Not stated
6. A 6 № 1349. Вы услышите диалог дважды. Определите, является ли следующее утверждение верным, или
не ​вер ​ным, или о нем нет ин​фор ​ма ​ции.
There are no snow-capped mountains on the island.
1) True
2) False
3) Not stated
7. A 7 № 1350. Вы услышите диалог дважды. Определите, является ли следующее утверждение верным, или
не ​вер ​ным, или о нем нет ин​фор ​ма ​ции.
Foreigners are not allowed to own property on the island.
1) True
2) False
3) Not stated
10.02.2015
Стр. 1 из 16
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8. B 3 № 1489. Вы услы​ши​те ре ​пор ​таж два ​жды. Вы​б е ​р и​те пра ​виль​ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.
The TV programme is designed to feature
1) actors pretending to be ordinary people.
2) people who vote for themselves to win a prize.
3) real people preparing dinner parties in their own homes.
9. B 4 № 1490. Вы услы​ши​те ре ​пор ​таж два ​жды. Вы​б е ​р и​те пра ​виль​ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.
The funniest part of the program is generally the
1) kitchen scenes of preparation and cooking.
2) contestants trying to impress each other.
3) host selecting ingredients.
10. B 5 № 1491. Вы услы​ши​те ре ​пор ​таж два ​жды. Вы​б е ​р и​те пра ​виль​ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.
The narrator believes that people are fascinated by other peoples’ homes
1) since everybody likes to show off their homes.
2) but doesn’t know why.
3) because decor and layout are fascinating.
11. B 6 № 1492. Вы услы​ши​те ре ​пор ​таж два ​жды. Вы​б е ​р и​те пра ​виль​ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.
Each of the guests
1) gives the host a mark out of 10.
2) privately complains about the host.
3) publicly thank the host.
12. B 7 № 1493. Вы услы​ши​те ре ​пор ​таж два ​жды. Вы​б е ​р и​те пра ​виль​ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.
Some of the shows contestants
1) leave the show on a Friday.
2) become real TV stars.
3) become minor celebrities.
13. B 8 № 1494. Вы услы​ши​те ре ​пор ​таж два ​жды. Вы​б е ​р и​те пра ​виль​ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.
The celebrity version of the show works well because
1) much is already known about the contestants.
2) the prizes go to charity.
3) celebrities often hate each other.
14. B 9 № 1495. Вы услы​ши​те ре ​пор ​таж два ​жды. Вы​б е ​р и​те пра ​виль​ный ответ 1, 2 или 3.
The narrator might apply for the show because
1) he’d serve fish that he caught.
2) it would probably be good fun.
3) in reality he’s a professional chef.
10.02.2015
Стр. 2 из 16
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15. B 12 № 714. The narrator said that he liked London cab drivers because they
1) can be trusted and nice to deal with.
2) can drive in a straight line.
3) know all the hotels and streets in the city.
4) make friends easily.
Hazlitt’s Hotel
I took a cab to Hazlitt’s Hotel on Frith Street. I like Hazlitt’s because it’s intentionally obscure — it doesn’t have a sign or a
plaque or anything at all to betray its purpose — which puts you in a rare position of strength with your cab driver. Let me say
right now that London cab drivers are without question the finest in the world. They are trustworthy, safe and honest, generally
friendly and always polite. They keep their vehicles spotless inside and out, and they will put themselves to the most
extraordinary inconvenience to drop you at the front entrance of your destination. There are really only a couple of odd things
about them. One is that they cannot drive more than two hundred feet in a straight line. I’ve never understood this, but no
matter where you are or what the driving conditions, every two hundred feet a little bell goes off in their heads and they
abruptly lunge down a side street. And when you get to your hotel or railway station or wherever it is you are going, they like to
drive you all the way around it so that you can see it from all angles before alighting.
The other distinctive thing about them, and the reason I like to go to Hazlitt’s, is that they cannot bear to admit that they don’t
know the location of something they feel they ought to know, like a hotel, which I think is rather sweet. To become a London
cab driver you have to master something titled The Knowledge — in effect, learn every street, hospital, hotel, police station,
cricket ground, cemetery and other notable landmarks in this amazingly vast and confusing city. It takes years and the cabbies
are justifiably proud of their achievement. It would kill them to admit that there could exist in central London a hotel that they
have never heard of. So what the cabbie does is probe. He drives in no particular direction for a block or two, then glances at
you in the mirror and in an overcasual voice says, “Hazlitt’s — that’s the one on Curzon Street, innit, guv? Opposite the Blue
Lion?” But the instant he sees a knowing smile of demurral forming on your lips, he hastily says, “No, hang on a minute, I’m
thinking of the Hazelbury. Yeah, the Hazelbury. You want Hazlitt’s, right?” He’ll drive on a bit in a fairly random direction.
“That’s this side of Shepherd’s Bush, innit?” he’ll suggest speculatively.
When you tell him that it’s on Frith Street, he says. “Yeah, that the one. Course it is. I know it — modern place, lots of glass”.
“Actually, it’s an eighteenth-century brick building.”
“Course it is. I know it.” And he immediately executes a dramatic U-turn, causing a passing cyclist to steer into a lamppost (but
that’s all right because he has on cycle clips and one of those geeky slip stream helmets that all but invite you to knock him
over). “Yeah, you had me thinking of the Hazelbury” the driver adds, chuckling as if to say it’s a lucky thing he sorted that one
out for you, and then lunges down a little side street off the Strand called Running Sore Lane or Sphincter Passage, which, like
so much else in London, you had never noticed was there before. 10.02.2015
Стр. 3 из 16
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16. B 13 № 715. Which of the following statements about London cab drivers is true according to the narrator?
1) They prefer driving in a straight line.
2) They prefer side streets to main streets.
3) They have little bells in their cars.
4) They let you see your hotel from all angles.
Hazlitt’s Hotel
I took a cab to Hazlitt’s Hotel on Frith Street. I like Hazlitt’s because it’s intentionally obscure — it doesn’t have a sign or a
plaque or anything at all to betray its purpose — which puts you in a rare position of strength with your cab driver. Let me say
right now that London cab drivers are without question the finest in the world. They are trustworthy, safe and honest, generally
friendly and always polite. They keep their vehicles spotless inside and out, and they will put themselves to the most
extraordinary inconvenience to drop you at the front entrance of your destination. There are really only a couple of odd things
about them. One is that they cannot drive more than two hundred feet in a straight line. I’ve never understood this, but no
matter where you are or what the driving conditions, every two hundred feet a little bell goes off in their heads and they
abruptly lunge down a side street. And when you get to your hotel or railway station or wherever it is you are going, they like to
drive you all the way around it so that you can see it from all angles before alighting.
The other distinctive thing about them, and the reason I like to go to Hazlitt’s, is that they cannot bear to admit that they don’t
know the location of something they feel they ought to know, like a hotel, which I think is rather sweet. To become a London
cab driver you have to master something titled The Knowledge — in effect, learn every street, hospital, hotel, police station,
cricket ground, cemetery and other notable landmarks in this amazingly vast and confusing city. It takes years and the cabbies
are justifiably proud of their achievement. It would kill them to admit that there could exist in central London a hotel that they
have never heard of. So what the cabbie does is probe. He drives in no particular direction for a block or two, then glances at
you in the mirror and in an overcasual voice says, “Hazlitt’s — that’s the one on Curzon Street, innit, guv? Opposite the Blue
Lion?” But the instant he sees a knowing smile of demurral forming on your lips, he hastily says, “No, hang on a minute, I’m
thinking of the Hazelbury. Yeah, the Hazelbury. You want Hazlitt’s, right?” He’ll drive on a bit in a fairly random direction.
“That’s this side of Shepherd’s Bush, innit?” he’ll suggest speculatively.
When you tell him that it’s on Frith Street, he says. “Yeah, that the one. Course it is. I know it — modern place, lots of glass”.
“Actually, it’s an eighteenth-century brick building.”
“Course it is. I know it.” And he immediately executes a dramatic U-turn, causing a passing cyclist to steer into a lamppost (but
that’s all right because he has on cycle clips and one of those geeky slip stream helmets that all but invite you to knock him
over). “Yeah, you had me thinking of the Hazelbury” the driver adds, chuckling as if to say it’s a lucky thing he sorted that one
out for you, and then lunges down a little side street off the Strand called Running Sore Lane or Sphincter Passage, which, like
so much else in London, you had never noticed was there before. 10.02.2015
Стр. 4 из 16
Образовательный портал «РЕШУ ЕГЭ» (http://английский.решуегэ.рф)
17. B 14 № 716. A reason why the narrator liked to go to Hazlitt’s was that
1) cab drivers liked driving there.
2) it was in the center of the city.
3) cab drivers didn’t know where it was.
4) it was an old brick building.
Hazlitt’s Hotel
I took a cab to Hazlitt’s Hotel on Frith Street. I like Hazlitt’s because it’s intentionally obscure — it doesn’t have a sign or a
plaque or anything at all to betray its purpose — which puts you in a rare position of strength with your cab driver. Let me say
right now that London cab drivers are without question the finest in the world. They are trustworthy, safe and honest, generally
friendly and always polite. They keep their vehicles spotless inside and out, and they will put themselves to the most
extraordinary inconvenience to drop you at the front entrance of your destination. There are really only a couple of odd things
about them. One is that they cannot drive more than two hundred feet in a straight line. I’ve never understood this, but no
matter where you are or what the driving conditions, every two hundred feet a little bell goes off in their heads and they
abruptly lunge down a side street. And when you get to your hotel or railway station or wherever it is you are going, they like to
drive you all the way around it so that you can see it from all angles before alighting.
The other distinctive thing about them, and the reason I like to go to Hazlitt’s, is that they cannot bear to admit that they don’t
know the location of something they feel they ought to know, like a hotel, which I think is rather sweet. To become a London
cab driver you have to master something titled The Knowledge — in effect, learn every street, hospital, hotel, police station,
cricket ground, cemetery and other notable landmarks in this amazingly vast and confusing city. It takes years and the cabbies
are justifiably proud of their achievement. It would kill them to admit that there could exist in central London a hotel that they
have never heard of. So what the cabbie does is probe. He drives in no particular direction for a block or two, then glances at
you in the mirror and in an overcasual voice says, “Hazlitt’s — that’s the one on Curzon Street, innit, guv? Opposite the Blue
Lion?” But the instant he sees a knowing smile of demurral forming on your lips, he hastily says, “No, hang on a minute, I’m
thinking of the Hazelbury. Yeah, the Hazelbury. You want Hazlitt’s, right?” He’ll drive on a bit in a fairly random direction.
“That’s this side of Shepherd’s Bush, innit?” he’ll suggest speculatively.
When you tell him that it’s on Frith Street, he says. “Yeah, that the one. Course it is. I know it — modern place, lots of glass”.
“Actually, it’s an eighteenth-century brick building.”
“Course it is. I know it.” And he immediately executes a dramatic U-turn, causing a passing cyclist to steer into a lamppost (but
that’s all right because he has on cycle clips and one of those geeky slip stream helmets that all but invite you to knock him
over). “Yeah, you had me thinking of the Hazelbury” the driver adds, chuckling as if to say it’s a lucky thing he sorted that one
out for you, and then lunges down a little side street off the Strand called Running Sore Lane or Sphincter Passage, which, like
so much else in London, you had never noticed was there before. 10.02.2015
Стр. 5 из 16
Образовательный портал «РЕШУ ЕГЭ» (http://английский.решуегэ.рф)
18. B 15 № 717. According to the narrator, to be a London cab driver, one has to
1) be ready to study the city for years.
2) be knowledgeable.
3) be proud of the city.
4) know all streets and places in London.
Hazlitt’s Hotel
I took a cab to Hazlitt’s Hotel on Frith Street. I like Hazlitt’s because it’s intentionally obscure — it doesn’t have a sign or a
plaque or anything at all to betray its purpose — which puts you in a rare position of strength with your cab driver. Let me say
right now that London cab drivers are without question the finest in the world. They are trustworthy, safe and honest, generally
friendly and always polite. They keep their vehicles spotless inside and out, and they will put themselves to the most
extraordinary inconvenience to drop you at the front entrance of your destination. There are really only a couple of odd things
about them. One is that they cannot drive more than two hundred feet in a straight line. I’ve never understood this, but no
matter where you are or what the driving conditions, every two hundred feet a little bell goes off in their heads and they
abruptly lunge down a side street. And when you get to your hotel or railway station or wherever it is you are going, they like to
drive you all the way around it so that you can see it from all angles before alighting.
The other distinctive thing about them, and the reason I like to go to Hazlitt’s, is that they cannot bear to admit that they don’t
know the location of something they feel they ought to know, like a hotel, which I think is rather sweet. To become a London
cab driver you have to master something titled The Knowledge — in effect, learn every street, hospital, hotel, police station,
cricket ground, cemetery and other notable landmarks in this amazingly vast and confusing city. It takes years and the cabbies
are justifiably proud of their achievement. It would kill them to admit that there could exist in central London a hotel that they
have never heard of. So what the cabbie does is probe. He drives in no particular direction for a block or two, then glances at
you in the mirror and in an overcasual voice says, “Hazlitt’s — that’s the one on Curzon Street, innit, guv? Opposite the Blue
Lion?” But the instant he sees a knowing smile of demurral forming on your lips, he hastily says, “No, hang on a minute, I’m
thinking of the Hazelbury. Yeah, the Hazelbury. You want Hazlitt’s, right?” He’ll drive on a bit in a fairly random direction.
“That’s this side of Shepherd’s Bush, innit?” he’ll suggest speculatively.
When you tell him that it’s on Frith Street, he says. “Yeah, that the one. Course it is. I know it — modern place, lots of glass”.
“Actually, it’s an eighteenth-century brick building.”
“Course it is. I know it.” And he immediately executes a dramatic U-turn, causing a passing cyclist to steer into a lamppost (but
that’s all right because he has on cycle clips and one of those geeky slip stream helmets that all but invite you to knock him
over). “Yeah, you had me thinking of the Hazelbury” the driver adds, chuckling as if to say it’s a lucky thing he sorted that one
out for you, and then lunges down a little side street off the Strand called Running Sore Lane or Sphincter Passage, which, like
so much else in London, you had never noticed was there before. 10.02.2015
Стр. 6 из 16
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19. B 16 № 718. According to the narrator, if the cab driver did not know a hotel in London he would
1) panic.
2) ask the passenger.
3) use a map.
4) never admit it.
Hazlitt’s Hotel
I took a cab to Hazlitt’s Hotel on Frith Street. I like Hazlitt’s because it’s intentionally obscure — it doesn’t have a sign or a
plaque or anything at all to betray its purpose — which puts you in a rare position of strength with your cab driver. Let me say
right now that London cab drivers are without question the finest in the world. They are trustworthy, safe and honest, generally
friendly and always polite. They keep their vehicles spotless inside and out, and they will put themselves to the most
extraordinary inconvenience to drop you at the front entrance of your destination. There are really only a couple of odd things
about them. One is that they cannot drive more than two hundred feet in a straight line. I’ve never understood this, but no
matter where you are or what the driving conditions, every two hundred feet a little bell goes off in their heads and they
abruptly lunge down a side street. And when you get to your hotel or railway station or wherever it is you are going, they like to
drive you all the way around it so that you can see it from all angles before alighting.
The other distinctive thing about them, and the reason I like to go to Hazlitt’s, is that they cannot bear to admit that they don’t
know the location of something they feel they ought to know, like a hotel, which I think is rather sweet. To become a London
cab driver you have to master something titled The Knowledge — in effect, learn every street, hospital, hotel, police station,
cricket ground, cemetery and other notable landmarks in this amazingly vast and confusing city. It takes years and the cabbies
are justifiably proud of their achievement. It would kill them to admit that there could exist in central London a hotel that they
have never heard of. So what the cabbie does is probe. He drives in no particular direction for a block or two, then glances at
you in the mirror and in an overcasual voice says, “Hazlitt’s — that’s the one on Curzon Street, innit, guv? Opposite the Blue
Lion?” But the instant he sees a knowing smile of demurral forming on your lips, he hastily says, “No, hang on a minute, I’m
thinking of the Hazelbury. Yeah, the Hazelbury. You want Hazlitt’s, right?” He’ll drive on a bit in a fairly random direction.
“That’s this side of Shepherd’s Bush, innit?” he’ll suggest speculatively.
When you tell him that it’s on Frith Street, he says. “Yeah, that the one. Course it is. I know it — modern place, lots of glass”.
“Actually, it’s an eighteenth-century brick building.”
“Course it is. I know it.” And he immediately executes a dramatic U-turn, causing a passing cyclist to steer into a lamppost (but
that’s all right because he has on cycle clips and one of those geeky slip stream helmets that all but invite you to knock him
over). “Yeah, you had me thinking of the Hazelbury” the driver adds, chuckling as if to say it’s a lucky thing he sorted that one
out for you, and then lunges down a little side street off the Strand called Running Sore Lane or Sphincter Passage, which, like
so much else in London, you had never noticed was there before. 10.02.2015
Стр. 7 из 16
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20. B 17 № 719. According to the narrator, when the driver finally knows where to go, he would
1) speed up.
2) say you are lucky he knew the place.
3) turn the car in the opposite direction.
4) admit he was confused at first.
Hazlitt’s Hotel
I took a cab to Hazlitt’s Hotel on Frith Street. I like Hazlitt’s because it’s intentionally obscure — it doesn’t have a sign or a
plaque or anything at all to betray its purpose — which puts you in a rare position of strength with your cab driver. Let me say
right now that London cab drivers are without question the finest in the world. They are trustworthy, safe and honest, generally
friendly and always polite. They keep their vehicles spotless inside and out, and they will put themselves to the most
extraordinary inconvenience to drop you at the front entrance of your destination. There are really only a couple of odd things
about them. One is that they cannot drive more than two hundred feet in a straight line. I’ve never understood this, but no
matter where you are or what the driving conditions, every two hundred feet a little bell goes off in their heads and they
abruptly lunge down a side street. And when you get to your hotel or railway station or wherever it is you are going, they like to
drive you all the way around it so that you can see it from all angles before alighting.
The other distinctive thing about them, and the reason I like to go to Hazlitt’s, is that they cannot bear to admit that they don’t
know the location of something they feel they ought to know, like a hotel, which I think is rather sweet. To become a London
cab driver you have to master something titled The Knowledge — in effect, learn every street, hospital, hotel, police station,
cricket ground, cemetery and other notable landmarks in this amazingly vast and confusing city. It takes years and the cabbies
are justifiably proud of their achievement. It would kill them to admit that there could exist in central London a hotel that they
have never heard of. So what the cabbie does is probe. He drives in no particular direction for a block or two, then glances at
you in the mirror and in an overcasual voice says, “Hazlitt’s — that’s the one on Curzon Street, innit, guv? Opposite the Blue
Lion?” But the instant he sees a knowing smile of demurral forming on your lips, he hastily says, “No, hang on a minute, I’m
thinking of the Hazelbury. Yeah, the Hazelbury. You want Hazlitt’s, right?” He’ll drive on a bit in a fairly random direction.
“That’s this side of Shepherd’s Bush, innit?” he’ll suggest speculatively.
When you tell him that it’s on Frith Street, he says. “Yeah, that the one. Course it is. I know it — modern place, lots of glass”.
“Actually, it’s an eighteenth-century brick building.”
“Course it is. I know it.” And he immediately executes a dramatic U-turn, causing a passing cyclist to steer into a lamppost (but
that’s all right because he has on cycle clips and one of those geeky slip stream helmets that all but invite you to knock him
over). “Yeah, you had me thinking of the Hazelbury” the driver adds, chuckling as if to say it’s a lucky thing he sorted that one
out for you, and then lunges down a little side street off the Strand called Running Sore Lane or Sphincter Passage, which, like
so much else in London, you had never noticed was there before. 10.02.2015
Стр. 8 из 16
Образовательный портал «РЕШУ ЕГЭ» (http://английский.решуегэ.рф)
21. B 18 № 720. What is the narrator’s general attitude towards London cab drivers?
1) Ironic.
2) Supportive.
3) Accusatory.
4) Critical.
Hazlitt’s Hotel
I took a cab to Hazlitt’s Hotel on Frith Street. I like Hazlitt’s because it’s intentionally obscure — it doesn’t have a sign or a
plaque or anything at all to betray its purpose — which puts you in a rare position of strength with your cab driver. Let me say
right now that London cab drivers are without question the finest in the world. They are trustworthy, safe and honest, generally
friendly and always polite. They keep their vehicles spotless inside and out, and they will put themselves to the most
extraordinary inconvenience to drop you at the front entrance of your destination. There are really only a couple of odd things
about them. One is that they cannot drive more than two hundred feet in a straight line. I’ve never understood this, but no
matter where you are or what the driving conditions, every two hundred feet a little bell goes off in their heads and they
abruptly lunge down a side street. And when you get to your hotel or railway station or wherever it is you are going, they like to
drive you all the way around it so that you can see it from all angles before alighting.
The other distinctive thing about them, and the reason I like to go to Hazlitt’s, is that they cannot bear to admit that they don’t
know the location of something they feel they ought to know, like a hotel, which I think is rather sweet. To become a London
cab driver you have to master something titled The Knowledge — in effect, learn every street, hospital, hotel, police station,
cricket ground, cemetery and other notable landmarks in this amazingly vast and confusing city. It takes years and the cabbies
are justifiably proud of their achievement. It would kill them to admit that there could exist in central London a hotel that they
have never heard of. So what the cabbie does is probe. He drives in no particular direction for a block or two, then glances at
you in the mirror and in an overcasual voice says, “Hazlitt’s — that’s the one on Curzon Street, innit, guv? Opposite the Blue
Lion?” But the instant he sees a knowing smile of demurral forming on your lips, he hastily says, “No, hang on a minute, I’m
thinking of the Hazelbury. Yeah, the Hazelbury. You want Hazlitt’s, right?” He’ll drive on a bit in a fairly random direction.
“That’s this side of Shepherd’s Bush, innit?” he’ll suggest speculatively.
When you tell him that it’s on Frith Street, he says. “Yeah, that the one. Course it is. I know it — modern place, lots of glass”.
“Actually, it’s an eighteenth-century brick building.”
“Course it is. I know it.” And he immediately executes a dramatic U-turn, causing a passing cyclist to steer into a lamppost (but
that’s all right because he has on cycle clips and one of those geeky slip stream helmets that all but invite you to knock him
over). “Yeah, you had me thinking of the Hazelbury” the driver adds, chuckling as if to say it’s a lucky thing he sorted that one
out for you, and then lunges down a little side street off the Strand called Running Sore Lane or Sphincter Passage, which, like
so much else in London, you had never noticed was there before. 10.02.2015
Стр. 9 из 16
22. B 32 № 399. Вставь​те про​п у​щ ен​ное слово:
Образовательный портал «РЕШУ ЕГЭ» (http://английский.решуегэ.рф)
1) watching
2) looking
3) staring
4) gazing
A strange girl
Stephen pulled up the collar of his coat as he walked along the platform. Overhead a dim fog clouded the station. He was
A22 ______ trains move slowly, throwing off clouds of steam into the cold air. Everything was dirty and smoke-grimed.
Stephen thought with revulsion: “What a foul country — what a foul city!” He had to A23 ______ that his first excited reaction to
London — its shops, its restaurants, its well-dressed attractive women — had faded. Supposing he were back in South Africa
now... To A24 ______ the truth, he felt a quick pang of homesickness. Sunshine — blue skies — gardens of flowers. And here
— dirt, grime and endless crowds — moving, hurrying, jostling.
He got on a train and passed along the corridor, looking for a place. The train was full. It was only three days before Christmas.
He A25 ______ to go to his parents for Christmas... And then, suddenly, he caught his breath, looking into a carriage. This girl
was different. Black hair, rich creamy pallor, the sad proud eyes of the South... It was all wrong that this girl should be sitting in
this train A26 ______ these dull drab looking people. She should be somewhere splendid, not squeezed into the corner of a
third class carriage.
He was an observant man. He did not fail to A27 ______ the shabbiness of her black coat and skirt, the cheap quality of her
gloves. A28 ______ splendor was the quality he associated with her. He thought: “I’ve got to know who she is and what she’s
doing here.”
23. B 33 № 400. Вставь​те про​п у​щ ен​ное слово:
1) adopt
2) accept
3) admit
4) agree
A strange girl
Stephen pulled up the collar of his coat as he walked along the platform. Overhead a dim fog clouded the station. He was
A22 ______ trains move slowly, throwing off clouds of steam into the cold air. Everything was dirty and smoke-grimed.
Stephen thought with revulsion: “What a foul country — what a foul city!” He had to A23 ______ that his first excited reaction to
London — its shops, its restaurants, its well-dressed attractive women — had faded. Supposing he were back in South Africa
now... To A24 ______ the truth, he felt a quick pang of homesickness. Sunshine — blue skies — gardens of flowers. And here
— dirt, grime and endless crowds — moving, hurrying, jostling.
He got on a train and passed along the corridor, looking for a place. The train was full. It was only three days before Christmas.
He A25 ______ to go to his parents for Christmas... And then, suddenly, he caught his breath, looking into a carriage. This girl
was different. Black hair, rich creamy pallor, the sad proud eyes of the South... It was all wrong that this girl should be sitting in
this train A26 ______ these dull drab looking people. She should be somewhere splendid, not squeezed into the corner of a
third class carriage.
He was an observant man. He did not fail to A27 ______ the shabbiness of her black coat and skirt, the cheap quality of her
gloves. A28 ______ splendor was the quality he associated with her. He thought: “I’ve got to know who she is and what she’s
doing here.”
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24. B 34 № 401. Вставь​те про​п у​щ ен​ное слово:
Образовательный портал «РЕШУ ЕГЭ» (http://английский.решуегэ.рф)
1) say
2) talk
3) speak
4) tell
A strange girl
Stephen pulled up the collar of his coat as he walked along the platform. Overhead a dim fog clouded the station. He was
A22 ______ trains move slowly, throwing off clouds of steam into the cold air. Everything was dirty and smoke-grimed.
Stephen thought with revulsion: “What a foul country — what a foul city!” He had to A23 ______ that his first excited reaction to
London — its shops, its restaurants, its well-dressed attractive women — had faded. Supposing he were back in South Africa
now... To A24 ______ the truth, he felt a quick pang of homesickness. Sunshine — blue skies — gardens of flowers. And here
— dirt, grime and endless crowds — moving, hurrying, jostling.
He got on a train and passed along the corridor, looking for a place. The train was full. It was only three days before Christmas.
He A25 ______ to go to his parents for Christmas... And then, suddenly, he caught his breath, looking into a carriage. This girl
was different. Black hair, rich creamy pallor, the sad proud eyes of the South... It was all wrong that this girl should be sitting in
this train A26 ______ these dull drab looking people. She should be somewhere splendid, not squeezed into the corner of a
third class carriage.
He was an observant man. He did not fail to A27 ______ the shabbiness of her black coat and skirt, the cheap quality of her
gloves. A28 ______ splendor was the quality he associated with her. He thought: “I’ve got to know who she is and what she’s
doing here.”
25. B 35 № 402. Вставь​те про​п у​щ ен​ное слово:
1) held
2) used
3) took
4) kept
A strange girl
Stephen pulled up the collar of his coat as he walked along the platform. Overhead a dim fog clouded the station. He was
A22 ______ trains move slowly, throwing off clouds of steam into the cold air. Everything was dirty and smoke-grimed.
Stephen thought with revulsion: “What a foul country — what a foul city!” He had to A23 ______ that his first excited reaction to
London — its shops, its restaurants, its well-dressed attractive women — had faded. Supposing he were back in South Africa
now... To A24 ______ the truth, he felt a quick pang of homesickness. Sunshine — blue skies — gardens of flowers. And here
— dirt, grime and endless crowds — moving, hurrying, jostling.
He got on a train and passed along the corridor, looking for a place. The train was full. It was only three days before Christmas.
He A25 ______ to go to his parents for Christmas... And then, suddenly, he caught his breath, looking into a carriage. This girl
was different. Black hair, rich creamy pallor, the sad proud eyes of the South... It was all wrong that this girl should be sitting in
this train A26 ______ these dull drab looking people. She should be somewhere splendid, not squeezed into the corner of a
third class carriage.
He was an observant man. He did not fail to A27 ______ the shabbiness of her black coat and skirt, the cheap quality of her
gloves. A28 ______ splendor was the quality he associated with her. He thought: “I’ve got to know who she is and what she’s
doing here.”
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26. B 36 № 403. Вставь​те про​п у​щ ен​ное слово:
Образовательный портал «РЕШУ ЕГЭ» (http://английский.решуегэ.рф)
1) among
2) between
3) besides
4) along
A strange girl
Stephen pulled up the collar of his coat as he walked along the platform. Overhead a dim fog clouded the station. He was
A22 ______ trains move slowly, throwing off clouds of steam into the cold air. Everything was dirty and smoke-grimed.
Stephen thought with revulsion: “What a foul country — what a foul city!” He had to A23 ______ that his first excited reaction to
London — its shops, its restaurants, its well-dressed attractive women — had faded. Supposing he were back in South Africa
now... To A24 ______ the truth, he felt a quick pang of homesickness. Sunshine — blue skies — gardens of flowers. And here
— dirt, grime and endless crowds — moving, hurrying, jostling.
He got on a train and passed along the corridor, looking for a place. The train was full. It was only three days before Christmas.
He A25 ______ to go to his parents for Christmas... And then, suddenly, he caught his breath, looking into a carriage. This girl
was different. Black hair, rich creamy pallor, the sad proud eyes of the South... It was all wrong that this girl should be sitting in
this train A26 ______ these dull drab looking people. She should be somewhere splendid, not squeezed into the corner of a
third class carriage.
He was an observant man. He did not fail to A27 ______ the shabbiness of her black coat and skirt, the cheap quality of her
gloves. A28 ______ splendor was the quality he associated with her. He thought: “I’ve got to know who she is and what she’s
doing here.”
27. B 37 № 404. Вставь​те про​п у​щ ен​ное слово:
1) observe
2) note
3) spot
4) remark
A strange girl
Stephen pulled up the collar of his coat as he walked along the platform. Overhead a dim fog clouded the station. He was
A22 ______ trains move slowly, throwing off clouds of steam into the cold air. Everything was dirty and smoke-grimed.
Stephen thought with revulsion: “What a foul country — what a foul city!” He had to A23 ______ that his first excited reaction to
London — its shops, its restaurants, its well-dressed attractive women — had faded. Supposing he were back in South Africa
now... To A24 ______ the truth, he felt a quick pang of homesickness. Sunshine — blue skies — gardens of flowers. And here
— dirt, grime and endless crowds — moving, hurrying, jostling.
He got on a train and passed along the corridor, looking for a place. The train was full. It was only three days before Christmas.
He A25 ______ to go to his parents for Christmas... And then, suddenly, he caught his breath, looking into a carriage. This girl
was different. Black hair, rich creamy pallor, the sad proud eyes of the South... It was all wrong that this girl should be sitting in
this train A26 ______ these dull drab looking people. She should be somewhere splendid, not squeezed into the corner of a
third class carriage.
He was an observant man. He did not fail to A27 ______ the shabbiness of her black coat and skirt, the cheap quality of her
gloves. A28 ______ splendor was the quality he associated with her. He thought: “I’ve got to know who she is and what she’s
doing here.”
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28. B 38 № 405. Вставь​те про​п у​щ ен​ное слово:
Образовательный портал «РЕШУ ЕГЭ» (http://английский.решуегэ.рф)
1) Nevertheless
2) Nevermore
3) Although
4) Therefore
A strange girl
Stephen pulled up the collar of his coat as he walked along the platform. Overhead a dim fog clouded the station. He was
A22 ______ trains move slowly, throwing off clouds of steam into the cold air. Everything was dirty and smoke-grimed.
Stephen thought with revulsion: “What a foul country — what a foul city!” He had to A23 ______ that his first excited reaction to
London — its shops, its restaurants, its well-dressed attractive women — had faded. Supposing he were back in South Africa
now... To A24 ______ the truth, he felt a quick pang of homesickness. Sunshine — blue skies — gardens of flowers. And here
— dirt, grime and endless crowds — moving, hurrying, jostling.
He got on a train and passed along the corridor, looking for a place. The train was full. It was only three days before Christmas.
He A25 ______ to go to his parents for Christmas... And then, suddenly, he caught his breath, looking into a carriage. This girl
was different. Black hair, rich creamy pallor, the sad proud eyes of the South... It was all wrong that this girl should be sitting in
this train A26 ______ these dull drab looking people. She should be somewhere splendid, not squeezed into the corner of a
third class carriage.
He was an observant man. He did not fail to A27 ______ the shabbiness of her black coat and skirt, the cheap quality of her
gloves. A28 ______ splendor was the quality he associated with her. He thought: “I’ve got to know who she is and what she’s
doing here.”
29. B 1 № 1648. Вы услышите 6 высказываний. Установите соответствие между высказываниями каждого говорящего
A–F и утверждениями, данными в списке 1–7. Используйте каждое утверждение, обозначенное соответствующей
циф​р ой, толь​ко один раз. В за ​д а ​нии есть одно лиш​нее утвер ​жде ​ние. Вы услы​ши​те за ​пись два ​жды.
1. It is good to be spontaneous when travelling.
2. Weekends can be really boring.
3. Weekends are perfect for long walks.
4. The best thing about Saturday morning is breakfast.
5. It’s good to get outside at the weekend.
6. Sundays are for meeting friends and chatting.
7. Sport is more about fun than prizes.
Го​во​ря​щ ий
A
B
C
D
E
F
Утвер​жде​ние
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30. B 10 № 1373. Установите соответствие между заголовками 1–8 и текстами A–G. Запишите свои ответы в таблицу.
Ис​поль​зуй​те каж​д ую цифру толь​ко один раз. В за ​д а ​нии есть один лиш​ний за ​го ​л о ​вок.
1. Party dessert
2. Outdoor game
3. Taking care of a pet
4. Collecting things
5. Giving a party
6. Party animals
7. Fun on the way
8. Party game
A. Ask your parents for permission to have a party. Decide what kind of party you want and whether it will be held indoors or
outdoors. Send written invitations to your friends. Tell them what kind of party you are having, at what time, where, and whether
or not the guests should wear costumes. Make a list of games you would like to play. Ask your mother to help you prepare
refreshments. Ice cream, cake, cookies, and lemonade are good for any party.
B. This activity makes everybody laugh. Have the guests sit around the room. Choose one person to be a pussycat. The pussy
must go over to a guest and do his/her best to make the guest laugh. He/she can make funny meows and walk around like a
cat. The pussy goes from one guest to another until someone laughs. The first one to laugh becomes the new pussy.
C. It’s easy to make a cake from a cake mix that you get from the grocery store. You usually add only water or milk. Cake mixes
come in many flavours, such as chocolate, lemon, banana, vanilla and others. When you make a cake from a mix, always
follow the directions on the package carefully. Then you can be sure that your cake will turn out right and your guests will enjoy
it. Many mixes have a small envelope of powdered frosting hidden inside the flour.
D. As you ride on a bus with your friends, get someone to start singing. Everyone joins in. At the first crossroad, another person
starts a different song, and everyone joins in. Keep changing songs at every crossroad.
E. Looking after cats is easy. They wash themselves every day and eat almost any food. Cats like to drink milk and cream. But
they need to be fed on fish, beef, liver, and other kinds of meat. They need a clean, dry bed at night. You can use a basket or a
cardboard box for your cat’s bed. Cats like to play with a rubber ball or chase a string.
F. You can have a whole army of toy soldiers made of tin, wood or plastic. Some may be dressed in fancy uniforms, some may
be sitting on horses. Others may be ready for battle, carrying guns and shoulder packs. You can have soldiers from other
countries, or only Civil War soldiers or only modern soldiers. If you get two soldiers that are alike, trade your extra soldier with
another toy soldier lover.
G. Even animals get involved in elections. The donkey and elephant have been political symbols in the USA for more than 100
years. Why? In 1828, Democrat Andrew Jackson ran for president. Critics said he was stubborn as a donkey. The donkey has
been the symbol
of the Democratic Party ever since. In the 1870s, newspaper cartoonists began using the elephant to stand for the Republican
Party.
Текст
A
B
C
D
E
F
G
За​го​л о​вок
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31. B 11 № 1190. Прочитайте текст и заполните пропуски A–F частями предложений, обозначенными цифрами 1–7.
Одна из частей в списке 1–7 — лишняя. Занесите цифры, обозначающие соответствующие части предложений, в
таб ​л и​цу.
When I arrived in England I thought I knew English. After I’d been here an hour I realized that I did not understand one
word. In the first week I picked up a tolerable working knowledge of the language and the next seven years convinced me
gradually but thoroughly that I A ______ , let alone perfectly. This is sad. My only consolation being that nobody speaks
English perfectly.
Remember that those five hundred words an average Englishman uses are B ______ . You may learn another five
hundred and another five thousand and yet another fifty thousand and still you may come across a further fifty thousand C
______ .
If you live here long enough you will find out to your greatest amazement that the adjective nice is not the only adjective the
language possesses, in spite of the fact that D ______ . You can say that the weather is nice, a restaurant is nice, Mr. Soandso
is nice, Mrs. Soandso’s clothes are nice, you had a nice time, E ______ .
Then you have to decide on your accent. The easiest way to give the impression of having a good accent or no foreign
accent at all is to hold an unlit pipe in your mouth, to mutter between your teeth and finish all your sentences with the question:
“isn’t it?” People will not understand much, but they are accustomed to that and they will get a F ______ .
1. whatever it costs
2. most excellent impression
3. you have never heard of before, and nobody else either
4. in the first three years you do not need to learn or use any other adjectives
5. would never know it really well
6. far from being the whole vocabulary of the language
7. and all this
Про​п уск
A
B
C
D
E
F
Часть пред​л о​же​ния
32. B 19 № 271. Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово PLAY так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало
со ​д ер ​жа ​нию тек​ста.
The ‘All Blacks’
Rugby is the most popular sport in New Zealand. The country even has a Rugby Museum. The game ______ there as
early as the 1860s.
33. B 20 № 824. Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово LARGE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало
со ​д ер ​жа ​нию тек​ста.
The crater is 4,145 feet across, and 570 feet deep. It is the ______ impact crater in the entire world.
34. B 21 № 1653. Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово KNOW так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало
со ​д ер ​жа ​нию тек​ста.
Every student receives 15 hours of lessons each week from qualified and imaginative teachers. Evening activities give
students the opportunity to relax after a long day and get ______ one another in a relaxed, multi-national environment.
35. B 22 № 1654. Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово INVOLVE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало
со ​д ер ​жа ​нию тек​ста.
A Typical School Day
9.00 am is Assembly time. This ______ our being counted, told to be good and fifteen minutes of mind numbing boredom.
36. B 23 № 505. Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово ONE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало
со ​д ер ​жа ​нию тек​ста.
On the 7th of September a small group of balloonists got together to celebrate the __________________ Bristol Balloon
Fiesta.
37. B 24 № 92. Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово BRING так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало
со ​д ер ​жа ​нию тек​ста.
Nowadays, a visit to the Great Wall is like a tour through history backwards; it ______ tourists great excitement to walk on
the Great Wall of China, to stand on a watchtower and view the wall disappearing in the distance.
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38. B 25 № 553. Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово GOOD так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало
со ​д ер ​жа ​нию тек​ста.
Most Americans consider Independence Day and Thanksgiving to be the__________________ public holidays of the
year.
39. B 26 № 462. Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово MARVEL так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало
со ​д ер ​жа ​нию тек​ста.
The Opening Night
The Phantom of the Opera, Cats, Mama Mia… They are all stage musicals. The opening night of a new musical is always a
________________ event.
40. B 27 № 1567. Образуйте от слова ACTIVE однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически
со ​о т​вет​ство ​ва ​л о со ​д ер ​жа ​нию тек​ста.
Homework refers to any work or ______ that students are asked to do outside the classroom, either on their own or with
other students or parents.
41. B 28 № 602. Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово VISIT так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало
со ​д ер ​жа ​нию тек​ста.
Most of the land in National Parks is privately owned, but administered by an independent National Park Authority which
works to balance the expectations of __________________ with the need to conserve these open spaces for future
generations.
42. B 29 № 189. Образуйте от слова DIFFER однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически
со ​о т​вет​ство ​ва ​л о со ​д ер ​жа ​нию тек​ста.
Wynne’s crossword puzzle looked much ______ from the crosswords used today and had no black squares.
43. B 30 № 696. Образуйте от слова VARY однокоренное слово так, чтобы оно грамматически и лексически
со ​о т​вет​ство ​ва ​л о со ​д ер ​жа ​нию тек​ста.
Animal rights organizations use ______ tactics: picketing stores that sell furs, harassing hunters in the wild, or breaking
into laboratories to free animals.
44. B 31 № 559. Преобразуйте, если это необходимо, слово ORGANIZE так, чтобы оно грамматически соответствовало
со ​д ер ​жа ​нию тек​ста.
The Department of the Environment works with the support of a number of voluntary _________________ which
encourage young people to fight for a better environment. The success of the environmental movement often depends on
people between 18 and 30, statistics say.
45. C 1 № 1756. You have received a letter from your English-speaking pen-friend Tom who writes:
Last month our class went to Washington to visit the National Museum of American History. It was my first visit there and
it was fun! How often do you go to museums with your class, if at all? Which museum is your favorite or what museum would
you like to visit? Why do you think people should go there? This summer we plan to go hiking with my parents.
Write a letter to Tom. In your letter answer his questions, ask 3 questions about his summer plans. Write 100–140 words.
Remember the rules of letter writing.
46. C 2 № 377. Comment on the following statement: Some people think that extreme sports help to build character. What
is your opinion? Do you agree with this statement? Write 200–250 words. Use the following plan:
- make an introduction (state the problem)
- express your personal opinion and give 2–3 reasons for your opinion
- express an opposing opinion and give 1–2 reasons for this opposing opinion
- explain why you don’t agree with the opposing opinion
- make a conclusion restating your position
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