Session 1: What did Tudor soldiers wear

Session 1: Halloween
Learning Objective
Vocabulary
 to understand the origins of Halloween
 to understand the significance of certain traditions
 to understand the modern customs and old traditions
 to see how Halloween is celebrated in this country and around the world.
Halloween
celebration
tradition
modern
custom
important
Lesson introduction
Main activity
Independent Activity
Plenary
Assessment opportunities
Resources
Texts/ Websites
Celts
Significant
Christianity
Need a carved pumpkin!
Ask what is special about today (or this week, depending when the lesson’s being taught). Show pumpkin
(not carved face). What is this? Turn it around. This is something I’ve been busy with this last week.
Explain today is the start of a new topic – Festivals and Celebrations. As today is Halloween, doing this
first! Why are we looking at this is R.E. though?? What has Halloween got to do with religion?
Read some of History of Halloween (session resources - below) – how did it start? Why did it become a
Christian festival? Etc.
What about our modern traditions? Where do they come from? Use session resources to explain these and
talk about things like dressing up – another way of scaring the ghosts and ghouls away! Ask questions along
the lines of the cloze procedure to check understanding.
Re-look back at the pumpkin. Explain that we were going to carve pumpkins – but as I don’t have enough
pumpkins, we’re going to almost do that!
Group 1
Group 2
Group 3
1. Cloze procedure sheet.
2. Pumpkin ‘carving’ – balloons – draw own scary face on them!
Watch some of the espresso videos (see links below).
I can:
* say how Halloween began
* explain some of the things people do to celebrate
* explain how the celebration has changed over the years.
Computer with espresso
cloze procedure task
Orange balloons
Permanent black
access (optional)
markers
pumpkin templates/ideas
Espresso -> PSCHE 1 -> Special Days -> Fishy Halloween (video)
Espresso -> News 2 -> PSCHE -> Leisure -> Exploring Halloween -> Espresso Summary
Espresso -> Science 1 -> Food -> Pumpkin Exhibition (video)
Notes from lesson
History
Halloween celebrations are more than 2 000 years old. They go back to a time even before Britain was invaded by the
Romans and Anglo-Saxons. The Celtic people of Ireland and Scotland had a religious festival called Samhain (pronounced
sow-in). This took place towards the end of October, and the people celebrated the end of summer and the start of winter.
During the winter time, the Celts believed all sorts of scary ghosts would appear at night. The celebrations of Samhain
involved lighting bright lanterns and fires to scare the ghosts away. In addition, people would dress up as ghosts so that real
ghosts would mistake them for scary ghouls and leave them alone.
Christianity
About 1 200 years ago, most people in the British Isles had become Christian. Around this time, a new Christian festival,
called All Saints’ Day had been created. It took place at the same time as the festival of Samhain. To mark All Saints Day, a
special service called Mass of the Hallows took place. The night before All Saints' Day became known as All Hallows Eve,
because it was the evening (the eve) of the Hallows. It is from this day that Halloween gets its name (Hallows evening –
Halloween).
Celebrating Halloween
Halloween is a time to dress up in scary costumes and have lots of fun with friends and family. People still light lanterns and
fires, but this no longer holds any religious meaning. Halloween is always held on 31st October. Jack o’lanterns can be seen in
lots of places, as can many children, out trick-or-treating. It is lovely to visit the homes of their neighbours to receive small
gifts of sweets.
Halloween began over 2000 years ago. It all started with a Celtic festival, called Samhain (pronounced
Sow-in) which celebrated the end of summer and the start of winter. The Celts believed that during the
long, dark nights, ghosts would appear. To scare them away, the people would dress up as scary ghouls and
light fires and lanterns. About 1200 years ago, most people in the British Isles had become Christian.
They created a new festival called All Saints’ Day which is on 1st November, about the same time as the
Celtic festival Samhaim. This was a time to remember all the good people (the Saints) who didn’t have
their own celebration day, like St George, or St David. The day before All Saints’ Day was known as All
Hallows Eve, because it was the evening before a special service called Mass of the Hallows (Hallows eve –
Halloween…). That’s where Halloween gets its name! Nowadays, we celebrate Halloween by dressing up and
carving pumpkins. People used to carve turnips instead! Trick or Treating started as a way to visit and
celebrate with your neighbours, but before getting a treat, the children used to have to perform a song or
poem!
Halloween began over 2_______ years ago. It all started with a Celtic
festival, called S___________ which celebrated the e_________ of
summer and the start of W____________. The Celts believed that during
the long, d________ nights, g_________ would appear. To scare them away,
the people would d________ up as scary ghouls and light l__________ and
f__________. About 1200 y______ ago, most people in the British Isles
had become Christian. They created a new f___________ called All Saints’
Day which is on 1st November, about the same time as the Celtic festival
Samhaim. This was a time to r_______________ all the good people (the
Saints) who didn’t have their o_________ celebration day. The day before
All S_________ Day was known as All Hallows Eve, because it was the
evening before a special service called M_________ of the Hallows. That’s
where Halloween gets its name! Nowadays, we celebrate Halloween by
dressing up and carving p___________. People used to carve t___________
instead! Trick or Treating started as a way to visit and celebrate with your
n____________, but before getting a treat, the children used to have to
perform a s_________ or poem!
song
pumpkins
remember
years
ghosts
2000
own
Samhain
winter
festival
Saints’
Mass
end
lanterns
dark
turnips
neighbours
fires
dress