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United Nations Development Programme
Uzbekistan
“Inclusive employment and social partnership”
2011-2014
External Evaluation Report
Author: Sten Toft Petersen, Decent Work International
January 2014
1
Acknowledgements
The Evaluator would like to thank all those who have contributed to this evaluation report. The
Evaluator expresses his sincere gratitude to Stefan Priesner, Resident Representative, Aziza
Umarova, Head of Good Governance Unit, and KomilaRakhimova, Programme Associate on
Gender, UNDP Uzbekistan for their advice and support of the evaluation.
A special thank is due to Yana Chicherina, Project Manager, for her technical support, sharing of
required documentation and promptly responding to Evaluator’s questions and inquiries. The
Evaluator would like to thank all project staff for expressing and elaborating their ideas about the
project and its future directions.
The author of this report is grateful to Government officials, activists and leaders of CSO’s and
management of SE’s for sharing their views regarding the project’s performance, impact and
areas for future interventions. The Evaluator is thankful to B. Sharapov, Head of the Monitoring
and Analysis of Social Protection Activities Department, MLSP, for making himself available
for two days and joining the visit to Samarkand and Kharshi and for sharing his impressions
about the project and discussing possible interventions that could further improve social
protection of vulnerable groups in Uzbekistan.
The views expressed in this report do not necessarily reflect those of the UNDP Uzbekistan. The
author remains solely responsible for any errors that may remain in this report.
2
Table of Contents
Acronyms and Abbreviations .......................................................................................................... 4
Executive Summary......................................................................................................................... 5
Chapter 1: Introduction .................................................................................................................... 9
Chapter 2: Project Management....................................................................................................17
Chapter 3: Evaluation scope, objectives and methodology..........................................................18
Chapter 4: General evaluation findings........................................................................................19
Chapter 5: Findings by components………………………………………………………….… 24
Chapter 6: Lessons learned............................................................................................................40
Chapter 7: Recommendations........................................................................................................41
Chapter 8: Potential components of a new project........................................................................43
Chapter 9: Annexes ......................................................................................................................44
3
Acronyms and Abbreviations
CER
CIS
CoC
CSO
EU
FTUU
ILO
IOM
LFM
MLSP
M&E
NCO
NGO
PD
PFP
PWDs
SME
THB
UN
UNDP
UNICEF
Centre for Economic Research
Commonwealth of Independent States
Chamber of Commerce
Civil society organization
European Union
Federation of Trade Unions of Republic of Uzbekistan
International Labour Organization
International Organization on Migration
Logical Framework Matrix
Ministry of Labour and Social Protection
Monitoring and Evaluation
Non-commercial organization
Non-Governmental Organization
Project document
The Public Fund for Support to NCO’s and other Institutions of the Civil Society
under the Parliament of Uzbekistan
People with Disabilities
Small and medium size enterprises
Trafficking in Human Beings
United Nations
United Nations Development Programme
The United Nations Children's Fund
4
Executive Summary
Uzbekistan made good progress in promoting the opportunities of people with disabilities
(PWDs) and was one of the first countries in the Commonwealth of Independent States (CIS) to
focus on the problem of disability and to pass the law On Social Protection of The Disabled in
1991. Uzbekistan signed the International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
on February 27, 2009, which was a significant achievement in promoting a disability agenda.
The ratification of the Convention is still pending and can be expected on the mid- or long-term
only.
Also other vulnerable groups have over recent years got more attention in Uzbekistan. Victims of
THB are now being officially recognized and some referral mechanisms are being developed.
Women suffering from domestic violence are through CSO’s and shelters getting increased
attention. During the last two years and very much thanks to the IESP project are elderly people
living alone getting more attention also from the side of the Government. The problem is
recognized and there is an understanding that the problem will grow in the years to come. All
stakeholders are aware of the need for finding sustainable solutions for assisting the elderly.
Social Enterprises as an institution in the society is gaining increased attention not in the least
thanks to the IESP project which together with the MLSP and the PFP has managed to develop
initiatives which are strengthening the work of the SE’s and also have shown where legislation
has to be further improved to maximize the potential of the SE’s as an important instrument in
giving people from vulnerable groups a decent life.
Approach
To address some of the main barriers to social inclusions of vulnerable groups a project,
Promoting Accessibility, Civic Consciousness, Employment, and Social Support for People with
Disabilities (ACCESS) was launched in 2008. It was a joint project of the Ministry of Labour
and Social Protection of Population (MLSP) of the Republic of Uzbekistan and United Nations
Development Program (UNDP). Overall objective of the project was to improve inclusion and
employment opportunities for people with disabilities through:
a) increasing public awareness;
b) improving implementation of national legislation in the field of disability;
c) promoting accessible physical environment; and
d) creating a system of social support in the employment of PWD
The current IESP project is to be seen as a continuation of the ACCESS project.
UNDAF and CPAP for 2010-2015 pay special attention to the improvement of economic wellbeing of vulnerable groups, enhancing civil society, and increasing access of population to
quality services, as well as promoting gender equality and the equality of persons with
disabilities. In light of this, the main goal of the proposed project was to enhance social
partnership in the employment and social protection of population with focus on vulnerable
women and persons with disabilities.
The goal should be achieved through the implementation of the following project components:
1)strengthening social partnership in promotion of employment and social protection at policy
level (mainstream employment);
2) increasing employment opportunities and access to social services for vulnerable women and
persons with disabilities at community level through involvement of NGOs (supported and
sheltered employment).
The purpose of the evaluation is to assess the relevance, performance, management arrangements
5
and success of the project and provide recommendations for possible follow-up. The Evaluator
visited Uzbekistan between the 15- and the 20. December 2013.
The overall objective of the evaluation is to provide an objective assessment of the project in
terms of its relevance; efficiency; effectiveness of the project implementation strategy;
knowledge management; partnership strategy and sustainability. A mixed-method design was
used for this project evaluation to ensure triangulation of data that included the following
instruments: consultations with UNDP and project management; desk review of relevant UNDP
project documentation; semi-structured interviews with pre-determined sets of questions; a field
trip to Samarkand and Kharshi; interviews with colleagues from the United Nations Children's
Fund (UNICEF); informal conversational interviews and a seminar with stakeholders to validate
preliminary findings of the evaluation mission was also planned.
Overall findings of the evaluation:

The biggest contribution and impact of the project is that it managed to achieve dramatic
change in mind-set of decision-makers, front-line workers and ordinary people. Prior to the
project’s implementation social services provided by CSO’s and SE's were practically not on
the agenda at all.

The most remarkable results of project were the establishment of a new on-line employment
service instrument under the MLSP and the development of a law on social partnership
taking a fully new approach to development of SP.

At the strategic level, the MLSP is moving ahead towards ratification of the International
Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.

Journalists trained through the project will continue covering the issues of vulnerable groups
from social inclusive lens.

CSO activists trained in Case Management will continue to use the methodology and by that
keep and increase the professional level and efficiency when providing social services to
people from vulnerable groups.

The project is well-designed, straightforward and fairly easy to follow in its activity plans on
reaching its targets. The Evaluator acknowledges a comprehensive approach adopted by the
project that addressed such important areas as targeted training, awareness building
campaigns and capacity building. On a few issues have the expectations to achievable results
been too optimistic in the design phase and this has lead to non-fulfilment of targets linked to
these.

A strong team of dedicated and competent project management and staff to implement the
project that UNDP mobilized was instrumental to project’s success. There has however been
a too high staff flow in the project impacting negatively on the achievements of the project.

The project is well-managed. The Evaluator acknowledges a results-focused character of the
project document, but notices that documentation for changes to the project document
decided by the partners during the project implementation should be improved.

In the course of implementation the project gained reputation of being a reliable source of
high quality policy advice and expertise in the area of social services, social protection and
6
social partnership. As a result, the demands for analytical materials, including policy
commentaries and reviews, inputs into legislation process and Government Programs’
development increased significantly.

A law on social partnership is pending final adoption by the parliament. The adoption of this
law will create a unique opportunity for further strengthening of civil society institutions and
through that further development of democratic processes in the country.

The project has created a breakthrough in the field of gender awareness raising. An analysis
of gender aspects of employment was developed with active involvement of government
officials at the very highest level. It was the first time ever such a document was developed
and it has prepared the way for a more wide reaching gender mainstreaming.

The project developed and maintained good relations with the MLSP, the PFP, local
authorities in the pilot regions and other partners. It should be noted that the success of the
project to a big extent relies on the trust the Minister of Labour and Social Protection
personally has in the Project Manager.
Lessons Learned:

PWDs have complex needs and face multiple barriers to inclusion that should be addressed
through a comprehensive approach targeting various areas (e.g., employment training,
psychological support, and improving physical access of buildings).

Involvement of CSO’s in the development of reforms of social protection and development
of social partnership has proven essential.

Excellent working relations that the project established with the MLSP, NGOs, and other
partners proved to be very important for the project’s success.

Physical location of the project office in an institution belonging to the MLSP helped to
create an ownership among ministerial officials, including the Minister himself, but it is to a
certain extend at the cost of less interaction with other UNDP staff.

Project’s flexibility in responding to the demands for analytical materials, including policy
commentaries and reviews, inputs into legislation process and Government Programs’
development from MLSP ensured its success, but did at the same time leave planned
activities linked to issues like gender mainstreaming and labour protection with less
attention.
Recommendations:

Individualized rights based approaches to social services to PWDs and elderly people should
be promoted by a possible future project that will cover assessments and a wide range of
supports, tailored to the needs of an elderly person or an individual with disabilities.

Participatory approaches to policy and legislation development and monitoring, involving
CSOs, should be continuously promoted.
7

The regional/local level needs more targeted attention in conducting country-wide awareness
and capacity building interventions.

It would be timely to develop exit strategies for direct assistance to SE’s. SE support should
be concentrated on legal/administrative assistance and development of a suitable legal
framework incl. incentives for the SE’s.

The practical (bookkeeping) and legal assistance to newly established SE’s and SME’s
employing people from vulnerable groups should be continued, but conducted by other
stakeholders.

Maintain a proper balance between flexibility and focus on specific results outlined in the
project document. As the demands for project’s supports to vulnerable groups may change,
the project should be able to quickly respond to these opportunities. Plan of project activities,
including Project Organization Structure, could be reviewed together with partners twice a
year to improve project responsiveness.
It is recommended to develop a new project in line with the above recommendations, as far as
they remain relevant to meeting UNDP and Government’s short- and long-term goals in the area
of social protection and good governance. A new project may include the following components:




Support capacity building of the MLSP,
Promote increased employability of vulnerable groups with special focus on women in
difficult life situations and PWD’s,
Support the development of social partnership and new democratic civil society institutions,
Provide assistance in developing a framework for social services targeted at elderly people
living alone.
In addition to these main fields of intervention there is a need for finalizing the work started
within the current project in the field of gender mainstreaming and workers’ rights.
Sten Toft Petersen
January 2014
8
Chapter 1: Introduction
The term vulnerable groups summarizes a number of different groups of people who are in need
of support and/or protection from the side of the state and community.
Uzbekistan made significant steps forward in promoting the opportunities of people with
disabilities (PWDs) and was one of the first countries in the Commonwealth of Independent
States (CIS) to focus on the problem of disability and to pass the law On Social Protection of
The Disabled in 1991. Up to date, the Government has approved the new version of this law that
includes the detailed description of mechanisms of ensuring equal rights of persons with
disabilities and the accountability for breaching the law is heightened. The advantage of the law
is in the new approach, persons with disabilities are considered not “defective objects of charity”
but instead worthy citizens with equal rights. The law brings the national legislation into
conformity with international standards in the field of legal protection of persons with
disabilities. Uzbekistan signed the International Convention on the Rights of Persons with
Disabilities on February 27, 2009, which was a significant achievement in promoting a disability
agenda. The roadmap towards ratification has been developed.
Other vulnerable groups have till now had less attention even some positive initiatives could be
noticed. UNDP has over recent years in cooperation with the MLSP and other line ministries
besides the activities targeted on PWD’s taken a number of initiatives to provide social services
to elderly people living alone and women in difficult situations in life.
Uzbekistan has to address a number of barriers to social inclusion that PWDs face. An
assessment conducted by UNDP team in 2008 identified the following facts: official statistics
indicated that there were 780,000 people with disabilities (2% of total population) of whom 52%
were women and 48% were men in Uzbekistan; 31% of the total number of persons with
disabilities were receiving social benefits, and around 30% were employed. It was also found
that there was a gap in the data on education coverage and the levels of poverty among PWDs in
the Republic.
According to international data, the level of poverty among persons with disabilities is at least
four times higher than the average in a country, whereas their education and employment
opportunities are severely limited. Moreover, due to physical barriers, many public services are
often inaccessible for persons with physical disabilities. Even the agencies dealing with the
disability issues did not have proper facilities accessible to the persons with disabilities. Hence,
despite the achievements of Uzbekistan in creating legal basis for ensuring socio-economic wellbeing of persons with disabilities, the assessment found that the implementation of the existing
legislation remained not quite effective.
The MLSP is identified by the Government as responsible for the issues of social protection of
persons with disabilities and their employment. The Ministry has substantial experience and
potential in this field
To address some of the main barriers to social inclusion a complex project “Inclusive
employment and social partnership” (IESP) was launched by UNDP and the Ministry of Labour
and Social Protection of Population in 2011. The IESP is to be seen as follow-up to the ACCESS
project1 which was the first complex UNDP project that adopted that a complex approach to
address multiple barriers to inclusion that PWD face: “invisibility”, stigmatization and widely
1
The ACCESS project was implemented by UNDP Uzbekistan during 2008-2011.
9
spread “medical” approach to disability, limited access to information, communication and
decision-making, limited accessibility of physical environment, and insufficient system of sociolegal support.
The IESP project is directly linked and is being implemented to achieve a number of goals
outlined in main Government and UNDP documents:
Intended Outcome as stated in the Country Programme Results and Resource Framework:
3.2. Strengthened public administration at all levels that exercises efficient, accountable and
inclusive governance.
Outcome indicators as stated in the Country Programme Results and Resources
Framework, including baseline and targets:
Outcome 3.2. Indicator: Progress in civil service reform.
Outcome 3.2. Baseline: Law on public administration is not adopted.
Outcome 3.2. Target: Comprehensive strategy in place for civil service reform and shift towards
Result Based Management.
Applicable Key Result Area (from 2008-11 Strategic Plan) E:
Poverty reduction and achievement MDG / Promoting inclusive growth, gender equality and
achievement of the MDGs. Provisional Corporate Outcome: MDG-based national development
strategies promote growth and employment, and reduce economic, gender and social
inequalities.
Intended Outcome as stated in the Country Programme Results and Resource Framework:
1.2. Increased employment opportunities and economic security for vulnerable groups
Outcome indicators as stated in the Country Programme Results and Resources Framework,
including baseline and targets:
Outcome 1.2 Indicator: Number of poor communities who benefit from increased employment
opportunities, as well as improved access to microfinance, business advisory facilities and basic
social services
Outcome 1.2 Baseline: 200
Outcome 1.2 Target: 500
Applicable Key Result Area (from 2008-11 Strategic Plan) E:
Poverty reduction and achievement MDG / Promoting inclusive growth, gender equality and
achievement of the MDGs. Provisional Corporate Outcome: MDG-based national development
strategies promote growth and employment, and reduce economic, gender and social
inequalities
The project supports also the following of UNDAF and CP (2010-2015).
 UNDAF 2010-2015, Outcome # 1: Economic well-being of vulnerable groups is improved.
(residents of economically under-developed, mainly rural areas; women, particularly homebased workers; labour migrants and their families; children, particularly most-at-risk
adolescents; the elderly; HIV-positive people; and people with disabilities).2
2United
Nations Development Assistance Framework for 2010-2015, http://www.undg.org/docs/10675/Uzbekistan-UNDAF-20102015---English.pdf, last accessed on December 7, 2010
10

CP outcome # 1.1 Enhanced capacity of the central and local authorities to develop and
implement economic and social security policies aimed at welfare improvement of
vulnerable groups.3

Overall objective of the IESP Project is to improve inclusion and employment opportunities
for people from vulnerable groups hereunder with disabilities through:
a) Informed employment policy making, data-collection, analysis and M&E (including
through innovative ICT tools);
b) Support women for realizing their labour potential and mainstreaming gender
considerations into employment policy making;
c)Raised awareness of policy makers, civil society institutions on inclusive employment and
social partnership;
d) Increased capacity of NGOs and state bodies in joint provision of vocational training,
employment and social services;
e) Knowledge documented on sheltered employment (social enterprises), recommendations
and methodology for its scale up are developed.
Population in Uzbekistan exceeds 30 million, with half of it being composed of young people
under the age of 27 and 64% residing in rural areas. Thus employment creation, including for
vulnerable layers of population, and sustainability as well as civil society development are the
most urgent and challenging issues for Uzbekistan. At the same time these issues are interlinked
and cannot be solved separately from each other. Social Partnership in employment is a
transparent and dynamic process of joint analysis, design, implementation and M&E of
programmes, policies and legislation in employment sphere by state bodies, civil society
institutions and private sector with interlinked roles and responsibilities. The crucial role of civil
society organizations (CSOs) in employment policy formulation, its M&E, as well as in the
provision of supported and sheltered employment for vulnerable people has not been fully
recognized or used. In this regard the IESP project was launched in 2011. The project aims as
indicated above to provide access for CSOs to decision making in employment sector, as well as
to provide CSOs with access to state financial and administrative resources for implementation
of their social programmes. Persons with disabilities and vulnerable and socially handicapped
women were foreseen to become the main project beneficiaries. The project capitalized
on previous successful initiative of UNDP and the Ministry in promoting the rights of persons
with disabilities ACCESS that ran from 2008 to 2011 in pilot cities of Tashkent, Samarkand and
Shakhrisabz.
This Evaluation is initiated by the UNDP Uzbekistan and aims to assess the relevance,
performance, management arrangements and success of the project and provide
recommendations for possible follow-up, it is anticipated that the outcomes of the evaluation will
be a clear source for future planning and prioritization of UNDP Uzbekistan activities in the field
of social inclusion, civil society engagement into inclusive development, social services and
employment generation for vulnerable groups. It should provide the basis for learning and
accountability for managers and stakeholders.
A) Methodology
Scope and Purpose of the evaluation of the UNDP IESP project
The purpose of this evaluation is to document, describe and assess the IESP project – its
UNDP Uzbekistan Country Program Action Plan (CPAP) 2010-2015, www.undp.uz/en/publications/publication.php?id=237, last
accessed on December 3, 2010
3
11
implementation strategies, activities, processes and outputs in the period between its start in
April 2011 and end of 2013. The project was funded by UNDP Regular Budget and an in kind
contribution from the Government of Uzbekistan. The evaluation will cover the start of the
project through the end of 2013. The Evaluator has formulated a set of research questions
described in this section (included in full in Annex A) in response to a set of areas of interest
articulated by UNDP in the TOR for the evaluation. The evaluation addresses these questions
and areas of interest using a limited set of both extant and original data collected for this
evaluation in the brief, 25 days period allotted for evaluation. The Consultant will conduct as
thorough an analysis as possible of these data to produce a set of study findings.
The terms of reference for this assignment stipulates, that the assessment should also seek to
assist UNDP in formulating future strategic plans for the inclusive employment activities. The
findings from this programme review thus form the basis for a set of recommendations to UNDP
regarding the current and future strategic vision, planning, implementation, and oversight of IE
and SP activities.
The research questions provide the structure for all data collection instruments in an attempt to
identify data able to address them. It is important to note that the data available will not address
all issues raised in the research questions equally. Therefore, the amount of data collected and
analyzed in relation to each question, and thus the number of findings and recommendations to
be included in this report, will vary according to the available data.
The following sections provide an overview of methodologies (research questions, data
collection, and analytical approaches) to be used in this review.
B) Study Design and Methodology
As suggested, a set of research questions developed by the evaluation in response to UNDP’s
articulated interests guided this assessment of the project implementation. These questions take
up the issue of how the project team pursued its work in the period under review, what the results
of this work were, and what lessons can be learned from responses to this work in the field. The
reviewed project documents provided by UNDP and collected original qualitative and
abbreviated data, as feasible within the short study timeframe and limited resources. The data
were analyzed through the lens of these research questions.
B.1) Research Questions
The Evaluator developed a set of research questions that could be addressed within the
timeframe and resources UNDP could devote to this evaluation. These research questions are
designed to reflect UNDP’s priorities in seeking to assess the work done within the framework of
the project in the period between April 2011 and December 2013, and to gain an understanding
of their key strengths and areas of contribution the project might have made through the
activities designed to increase employment among vulnerable groups through social partnership
in Uzbekistan. These questions, which are included in Annex 11.1, fall into three broad areas:
1. Identification and assessment of UNDP’s internal processes, including programmatic
goals, activities, inter-departmental cooperation, monitoring, outputs, outcomes, and
documentation related to the project.
2. Identification and assessment of external partnerships and of partner views of the project,
12
including visibility of activities and views of the projects successes, strengths and
weaknesses with regard to inclusive employment.
3. Identification and assessment of the project value added to efforts to increase inclusive
employment and further develop social partnership, including specific areas of expertise
and key lessons learned to serve as a basis for developing a strategic vision and planning
for future activities to which UNDP may be positioned to contribute.
B.2) Data Collection
This report is the result of a set of data collection and analysis methods employed over the period
November 2013 – January 2014 by an independent expert, Sten Toft Petersen, Senior Consultant
at Decent Work International. Data sources and collection included:
1. Review of documents related to the project, collected from the UNDP website and the
UNDP staff, and project documents related to a previous project seen as a first phase of
the current project circle (see Annex 11.3).
2. A site visit to the UNDP office in Tashkent, Uzbekistan to conduct interviews with
project staff in service at the end of 2013 and other UNDP staff members working in or
managing areas relevant to employment of vulnerable groups and social partnership.
3. Field visits to conduct around 10 interviews with staff and partners working on the
project in Tashkent, Samarkand and Kharshi.
4. 10 interviews with stakeholders working with (or with knowledge of) UNDP
employment strategies, plans, approaches, and activities, including NGO representatives
and international organizations.
The Evaluator employed two abbreviated methods to analyze these data. Data analysis methods
included: document review; site visit reporting and analysis prepared during field visits;
independent cross-site analysis of site visit interviews and documents; and descriptive data
analysis. These analytical approaches as well as study limitations are discussed below.
B.3) Site Selection
The sites to be visited during the evaluation were decided by UNDP. This sample represented
different types of work, with different types of stakeholders in different regions – a
geographically diverse environment. As indicated above, it included Tashkent, Samarkand and
Kharshi.
B.4) Document Review
Prior to and during field visits, the Evaluator reviewed annual project reports, minutes from
Project Board meetings, work plans, logical framework, implementing partner agreements, and
other materials related to project activities. The Evaluator also consulted published (i.e., on the
UNDP website and project Facebook profile) and unpublished materials related to the field
visits. While on site, the Evaluator collected and later reviewed additional materials pertaining to
site-specific activities, including narrative reports, and legal agreements, among others. The
purpose of collecting these documents was to increase the Evaluators understanding of
implemented activities; provide a context for project review methods; and identify existing data
to serve as relevant inputs for the analysis.
13
After an initial review of a subset of these project materials, the Evaluator developed a structured
case review tool or template to facilitate and support a consistent review of the documents
collected for this study. Using this case review template, the Evaluator then reviewed and
assessed documents related to the cases chosen for the review. The Evaluator read and extracted
data from these documents using the structured case review tool as a guide to produce a
systematic review of the documents available, and to enhance his understanding of UNDP
employment activities in the period between April 2011 and December 2013.
B.5) Field Visit
Original data for this review came primarily from a field visit to some of the regions of
Uzbekistan in which the project had been implemented. The field visit allowed the Evaluator to
interview staff directly involved with project activities as well as partner organizations
collaborating on or working on issues linked to employment of vulnerable groups. The field visit
allowed the Evaluator to interview the most relevant staff directly and in an independent manner,
as well as to assess coordination among governmental, non-governmental and multi-lateral
agency partners, and local implementation of the project activities.
Working with UNDP, the Evaluator developed a list of potential interviewees representing as
well local governmental as non-governmental partners. Overall, 45 individuals were interviewed.
The visit to Uzbekistan was carried out by the Evaluator, working with UNDP Tashkent office to
arrange each visit in the field. The Evaluator used the study research questions to guide the
development of data collection protocols to guide interviews to support the collection of
comparable data across respondents. Included in the protocols was an oral informed consent
procedure that guaranteed respondents’ confidentiality and sought to encourage their open and
honest assessment of UNDP strategies and activities in the field of inclusive employment and
social partnership in Uzbekistan.
Each site visit lasted one day (Tashkent 2 days) and included 60- to 90-minute interviews with
relevant partner organization staff working in the fields relevant for the project, as well as
collection of relevant mission- or project-level documentation. Sites included Tashkent,
Samarkand and Kharshi. The Evaluator also obtained follow-up information when needed via
email and phone. The field visit was conducted between December 15. and December 20. 2013.
The Evaluator took detailed notes during each interview to use as input to their structured case
review report. Ultimately, field data helped provide the project review with a qualitative, sitespecific portrait of a sub-set of the project activities, coordination efforts, network and capacitybuilding, training, governmental and civil society partnering and any direct assistance to PWD’s,
women in difficult situations and elderly people. The field visit interviews also provided a basis
for assessing implementation processes, outputs and outcomes, and thus for cross-site analysis.
Cross-site analysis used the field visit case reports, which incorporated document review and
interviews, to identify a set of project findings supported by data available for this review,
including lessons learned and UNDP value-added in increasing employability of PWD’s. These
findings were used, in turn, to develop recommendations to UNDP, as discussed further below.
14
C) Analytical Approaches
C.1) Case Analysis
Once the data collection phase of the assessment was complete, the Evaluator assembled all
available case-specific data into a case report. The case review template guided integration and
synthesis of in-person and telephone interviews, document review and limited survey data into a
site/case-specific report. As discussed above, the Evaluator produced the case review tool to
align with the study research questions and address major themes and topics of interest to UNDP
regarding the project implementation. The tool was structured to guide synthesis and analysis of
case-specific data according to the primary themes of interest across sites. This, in turn, allowed
the Evaluator to analyze and collect the case-specific data into a case report and to
simultaneously prepare it for cross-site analysis.
C.2) Cross-Site Analysis
Once the Evaluator assembled and analyzed the data by case and reviewed the analysis of the
survey data, they conducted a cross-site analysis with a focus on all major study themes. This
involved independent assessment of the frequency and strength of emphasis of each theme
related to the research questions located in the study data. Only where data sustained a theme
across a number of sites did it rise to the level of a finding. Once the Evaluator concluded a set of
data-backed findings, he pursued a similar process for recommendations. These findings and
recommendations can be found in Chapters 8 and 9of this report, respectively.
C.3) Study Limitations
The data sources consulted for this evaluation provides a sub-set of information about UNDP’s
strategies and activities in Uzbekistan in the period between April 2011 and December 2013.
Nevertheless, the data collected for this study have some limitations. The findings and
recommendations from this project review must thus be viewed in the context of these
limitations.
The study data are illustrative and not necessarily representative of all project activities. Most
data reflect UNDP’s work on implementing the project in the regions visited. From these data, it
is possible to draw some conclusions about what strategies have the potential to improve the
work. While it is reasonable to expect that improved strategies will yield stronger project
outcomes, this hypothesis remains to be confirmed empirically.
D) Organization of the Rest of the Report
The purpose of this report is to review, describe and assess the UNDP Inclusive employment and
Social Partnership project in the period between April 2011 and December 2013; respond to
study research questions as feasible using the data available for review in the 25 days time period
allotted for the review; and provide recommendations relevant to current and future strategic
focus and planning, funding, implementation and oversight of UNDP activities in Uzbekistan in
the field of employment of vulnerable groups and development of Social Partnership activities.
This first chapter was designed to provide the context for the project evaluation and presented an
overview of the methodologies used to collect and analyze data to inform report findings and
recommendations.
The rest of the report is organized as follows: Chapter 5 describes the project review’s primary
15
findings based on the brief data sources available and in relation to study research questions.
Chapter 8 offers recommendations to UNDP concerning development of a third phase of the
project. These recommendations are designed to provide some guidance in making strategic,
programming, partnering and funding decisions related to efforts to increase employability of
vulnerable groups, strengthen social protections and further develop Social Partnership. In the
concluding chapter, the Evaluator summarizes his considerations along the lines of the
evaluation criteria set out in the recruitment notice. The tools and sources for this study can be
found in Annexes 9.1-9.3.
16
Chapter 2: PROJECT MANAGEMENT
The Ministry of Labour and Social Protection of Population retains overall responsibility for this
nationally managed project and appoints the National Project Coordinator (NPC). Direct
responsibility of the NPC was provision of strategic advice, as well as coordination of the project
activities taking into account interests of the Government. NPC approves Annual Work Plan of
the Project, according to which the whole project activity is carried out.
The Project Board was established. It is responsible for making by consensus management
decisions for a project when guidance is required by the Project Manager, including
recommendation for UNDP/Ministry of Labor and Social Protection approval of project plans
and revisions. This Board contains three roles, including:
1) An Executive: individual representing the project ownership to chair the group. First
Deputy Minister of the Ministry of Labour and Social Protection was appointed for this
position as a National Project Coordinator.
2) Senior Supplier: individual or group representing the interests of the parties concerned
which provide funding and/or technical expertise to the project. The Senior Supplier’s
primary function within the Board is to provide guidance regarding the technical
feasibility of the project. This function was performed by UNDP Deputy Resident
Representative.
3) Senior Beneficiary: individual or group of individuals representing the interests of those
who will ultimately benefit from the project. The Senior Beneficiary’s primary function
within the Board is to ensure the realization of project results from the perspective of
project beneficiaries.
The evaluator reviewed the minutes of the Project Board’s meetings and confirms that the Board
approved implementations report and project work plans.
The project is managed by a very competent and experienced project manager, who has deep
insight in the subject. She is showing great engagement in moving the project initiatives forward.
The project staff is professional and has been able to show the needed flexibility for a successful
implementation of a project of this character.
The project is well supported by the Project Coordinator and the Head of the Good Governance
Unit. These are providing highly professional advice and support to the project staff.
The project has been challenged by high flow of staff. It has likewise been difficult to find
qualified staff to certain positions. The Project Board decided to employ an ICT Specialist
instead of a Gender Specialist as foreseen in the project document. The project activities have
suffered from this rotation of staff and the gender activities might have been moved even further
if a Specialist had been employed. The UNDP Economical Department is also implementing
activities in the field of social protection there have however been limited coordination between
the two units in this field.
17
Chapter 3: EVALUATION SCOPE, OBJECTIVES AND METHODOLOGY
The evaluation was based on key UNDP guidelines4 to evaluation and combined context,
outcome and process evaluation tools and approaches to provide rich and practical information.
The evaluation:
 examined how the project functions within its economic, social, and political environment
and project setting (context evaluation);
 explored how the project was implemented and described the operational processes through
which desired outputs are achieved. It examined the planning, setting up, and carrying out of
the project, as well as the documentation of the evolution of the project (process evaluation);
and
 assessed the short- and long-term results of the project and evaluated extent to which the
project contributes to or produces the intended improvements as they are described in the
project document (output evaluation). Specific focus was made on this part of the evaluation
to capture results and analysed whether, why and how the outputs have been achieved, and
assess the contribution of UNDP to a change in a given development situation.
This evaluation was based on the belief that evaluation should be supportive and responsive to
projects, rather than become an end in itself. The overall objective of the evaluation was to
provide an objective assessment of the project:

Relevance – the degree to which the purpose of the project remains valid and pertinent;

Efficiency – the ease of management of the project and efforts made to build the capacity of
the executing agency and other partners to implement the project;

Effectiveness of the project implementation strategy – the effectiveness of the project
implementation structure and fund-flow mechanisms adopted for implementing the project;

Knowledge Management – the extent to which a knowledge base is being established so
that a sustainable capacity is built for addressing the relevant development problems;

Partnership Strategy – the extent to which the project has leveraged key stakeholders in
this thematic area;

Sustainability – an assessment of the likelihood that the project will endure after active
involvement of UNDP has ended.
UNDP, Guidelines for Outcome Evaluators, 2002; UNDP, Handbook on Monitoring and Evaluating for Results, 2002 and
UNDP, Handbook on Planning, Monitoring and Evaluating for Development Results, 2009.
4
18
Chapter 4: GENERAL EVALUATION FINDINGS
This section presents high-level findings of the evaluation. More specific findings and analysis
by project component are covered in Chapter 7:

Overall performance of the project against the project objective and outcomes as set
out in project document and other related documents:
The project has exceeded the expectations outlined in the project document on a number of
indicators. The Evaluator finds that the biggest contribution and impact of the project is that
it has helped to move the issue of social partnership to a new level. Today SP is seen through
the lens of a new concept, which creates great perspectives for further democratisation of the
Uzbek society building on old traditions of decentralization and local self-management. The
new concept involving civil society in decision making and public control can have great
perspectives if developed in the right direction.
The traditional Mahalla system, where a lot of functions formally and/or informally are in the
hands of the local Mahalla council is of cause not meeting normal democratic standards, but
building on these traditions and adding democratic principles through the modern civil
society institutions can be an interesting mix, that can deliver a short-cut to further
democratisation of the society.
The project managed to follow-up to the previous project and secure a strengthening of social
enterprises as an institution in the economic and social protection sphere. There is still work
to be done in the further development of legislation to make the social enterprises
sustainable, but initiatives have been taken also in this direction within the framework of the
IESP project.
Working on developing social services for vulnerable groups the project puts focus on a
group of elderly people who de jure have relatives and by that not are entitled to a number of
social services, but de facto they are alone with no one to assist them. This group has
somehow dropped out of the public social protection scheme and the project contributed to
table the problem and secure that NCOs take on themselves to help these elderly people.
The project has contributed significantly to modernize the public employment service run by
the MLSP. On-line services and new methodologies for working with unemployed have been
developed and it is now up to the employment services at the regional level to make use of
these new opportunities.
The training of journalists and competition on media coverage has had a great impact on
journalists’ views on people from vulnerable groups. This will at the mid- and long-term
have a positive impact on the awareness about the problems of these groups in the public at
large.
The project failed to deliver on gender mainstreaming in state employment programs. It
should however be mentioned that for the first time ever has gender aggregated statistics
been included in the documents of the MLSP and a general increased gender awareness
among ministerial officials could be noticed. A new methodology on development of
employment programs incl. gender aspects was introduced and further developed in close
cooperation with the social partners.

Effectiveness and efficiency of the project
The project exceeded the expectations outlined in the project document and was effective.
The following Chapter 7 of the report provides more detailed analysis of project
effectiveness, by component.
19
The project spent relatively big amounts on salaries and fees to national consultants. These
costs were not avoidable because of the character of the project with its many soft inputs
(e.g., expert assistance, coaching and non-cost on the spot training) and the hands-on
management approach chosen towards the pilot projects.
Likewise were significant resources used for the development of the on-line employment
management system, both hardware and program development. It should be noticed that
procurement process of hardware was very successful and the price ended up some 40.000
USD below the budgeted.
The project office moved to new premises from this occurred a need for spending significant
amounts on repair and procurement of new office equipment.
The project strived to meet its expected outputs by looking for cost-efficiencies in project
operations and utilizing prudent business. The project, through its effective partnership
strategies, managed to implement a series of activities through cost-sharing measures the
excellent cooperation with the PFP should be highlighted as a major achievement in this
context.
As the project contains many elements of soft assistance and these soft elements are
embedded into various project components, the application of conventional efficiency
indicators is not feasible.
The project was cost-efficient. Efficiency measures how economically resources or inputs
(such as funds, expertise and time) are converted to results. On the basis of evidence
obtained, the Evaluator concludes that the project is efficient because it uses resources
appropriately and economically to produce the desired outputs.
Most project outputs exceeded the expectations of the project document that is one of
indicators of its efficiency. The share of administrative costs in the total project expenses
seems also not to have exceeded what is normally accepted within projects of such
complexity implemented by UNDP.
The Evaluator finds that individual expenses had been incurred in line with the requirements
set by the UNDP and were managed adequately ensuring that the budget available was spent
in line with the requirements set in the pledges.
The effectiveness of IESP project is assessed by the Evaluator as acceptable, in so far as
adequate information was available, but with room for improvement, particularly in
recording results and documenting justifications for changes decided by the Board and the
accordingly changes of budget. The project addressed different actions which require longterm commitment at an incremental pace of delivery. For those components the Evaluator
has reviewed, it is fair to state that outputs have contributed towards achieving the objectives.

Sustainability of the project’s interventions
Key outputs of the project are likely to be sustainable.
The new SP concept will further develop in the years to come and the process of
strengthening the civil society seems irreversible.
Not all SE’s will prove sustainable, but this is a natural business process.
The social services will be developed further in the future. The framework will very much
depend on the reforms to be implemented of the social transfer system.
Journalists trained through the project will continue covering the issues of vulnerable groups
from social inclusive lens.
20
The Minister of MLSP played a key role in the project implementation exhibiting high
ownership and commitment to further develop the initiatives taken within the framework of
the project.
At the strategic level, the Government is moving ahead towards ratification of the
International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities.
The success of the employment service on-line management depends on the readiness of the
MLSP to invest in securing continuity in the management of the system and the regional
employment services responsibility for up-dating the data.
The project staff has had a very strong hands-on involvement with the pilot projects. For the
stronger of these it seems not to be a problem, but for the weaker it could eventually develop
into a too strong dependency of project staff on the development and implementation of the
pilot project activities, by this the sustainability could be put in question.
The structure for financing social services through NCO’s is based on short term grants and
state orders, whereas the initiatives providing social services ex. help to elderly in their home
and shelters for women in difficult situations, are in need for stabile long-term financing.

Implementation and management arrangements of the Project.
The project is well-designed, straightforward and fairly easy to follow in its activity plans on
reaching its targets. The Evaluator acknowledges a comprehensive approach adopted by the
project that addressed such important areas as targeted training, awareness building
campaigns, and capacity building. In Evaluator’s view, such comprehensiveness contributed
to project’s success because vulnerable groups face challenges in various areas and only such
comprehensive approaches can be effective.
The project is well-managed. The Evaluator acknowledges a results-focused character of the
project document that helped to keep it focused. The project document contains very specific
goals and indicators of success. The Evaluator highly praises quality management for project
activity results as it contains very clear quality criteria and specific instruments to measure
the project’s progress vis-à-vis its goals. There is a comprehensive results-focused
monitoring system in place that helped to track the project’s progress. Overall, the Evaluator
found the tools used for monitoring project’s performance to be specific, measurable,
achievable, relevant and time-bound.
Project’s risks were correctly identified and strategies addressing them were properly
developed and implemented. UNDP Good Governance Unit conducted project assurance that
positively contributed to the project’s overall success.
A strong team of dedicated and competent project staff to implement the project that UNDP
mobilized was instrumental to project’s success. Project manager was in particular highly
praised by many partners for her dedication and focus on results.
In the course of implementation the project gained a reputation of being a reliable source of
high quality policy advice and expertise. As a result, the demands for analytical materials,
including policy commentaries and reviews, inputs into legislation development process and
Government Programs’ development increased over time.
There seems not to have been taken full advantage of the recommendations and lessons
learned from the previous ACCESS project. The current project could have benefitted from a
stronger attention to these recommendations during the design process.
.

Relevance of the project to national priorities
21
The project has been very flexible in adjusting to requests from the MLSP to take initiatives
meeting changing national priorities. At the strategic level has the project contributed to
meeting UNDP and government national plans and strategies on employment, social
protection and good governance.

Partnerships
The project developed and maintained extraordinary good relations with MLSP, CSO’s, local
authorities and other partners. Joint conferences and activities were implemented, successful
practices shared and mutual supports provided. The Evaluator found that as many activities
are directly or indirectly related to the labour market it would be beneficial for the project to
collaborate with a broader spectra of CSO’s dealing with labour market issues such as
Chamber of Commerce (CoC) and Business Women’s Association (BWA).
UNICEF experts expressed their concern that the MLSP is losing influence in the
Government as several areas of responsibility have been transferred to other ministries.
UNDP economic unit experts expressed the similar concern.
There seems to be an impression among stakeholders that the project very much builds on the
initiatives taken within the framework of the previous project5. This might be the case when
one compares the PD’s, but when analysing the activities implemented. It shows that the
IESP has developed in a rather different direction and taken up new initiatives.
The target groups for the project activities are defined in the PD – vulnerable groups incl.
women in difficult situations. The PD also clearly defines the partners among governmental
structures. When it comes to defining CSO’s and NCO’s to become beneficiaries it has been
the policy of the project management to invite all CSO’s active in the social protection field
in a given region.
The NCO’s to join the project as pilot institutions for providing social services were selected
through a country wide and well documented competition with the involvement of the Public
Fund for Support to NCO’s and other Institutions of the Civil Society under the Parliament of
Uzbekistan (PFP) and other project partners. The pilots have a 75% financing from the PFP,
it is the first time ever that such cooperation is in place. The PFP has expressed appreciation
of the good cooperation with the IESP project.
There has been an excellent cooperation between the IESP management and the PFP. The
mutual understanding of possibilities and limitations has brought very fruitful results. It is the
first time ever the fund is accepting a co-financing arrangement with an international
organization. The PFP see this as extremely positive as the cooperation is helping to
discipline the staff and the beneficiaries, when there is a foreign donor involved they behave
more responsibly and are encouraged to show measurable results.
The PFP expressed that there is a strong need for training on M&E with a special attention to
evaluation of the social impact of a given project.
The project is working on SP, development of enterprises, skills development and
employment of PWD’s it seems not rational that the Chamber of Commerce as an
organization representing private business has not been included as a main partner of the
project. During the evaluation the Chairman of the CoC did express strong interest in
participating in the further development of the initiatives taken within the project on
strengthening SE’s and increase employability of people from vulnerable groups.
22
The Federation of Trade Unions of Uzbekistan (FTUU) expressed great satisfaction about the
cooperation with the project, a number of joint conferences have been held both on workers’
rights, disabled persons and SE’s. They feel a good involvement with the project. The FTUU
expressed during the evaluation readiness to contribute with own resources to further
promotion of relevant activities ex. on worker’s rights, social services and employment
promotion.
One of the strongest women NGO’s the Business Women’s Association has not been a
partner of the IESP project and according to the President of the organization they have never
heard about the project. The BWA has 12.000 members and 68 local branches (planned to
grow to 100 during 2014). They are implementing projects for women in difficult situations
in life incl. disabled woman, but main focus is to help woman to start and develop their own
business. The BWA has taken a number of initiatives to increase the awareness about rights
among rural women. BWA has implemented projects with OSCE and they have implemented
22 projects with the PFP.
UNICEF is having a number of activities which are implemented in parallel to the IESP
project, but there has been close to none coordination on the interventions.

Validation of preliminary findings of evaluation mission with stakeholders. The
Evaluator made a presentation of preliminary findings at a validation workshop at the end of
his visit to Uzbekistan. This workshop was meant as an opportunity to management and staff
of relevant ministries as well as partner CSO’s themselves to share their impressions and
react to preliminary findings. Unfortunately did only UNDP staff participate in the
workshop. The Evaluator however benefited from this workshop as it helped to identify the
most important findings and recommendations.
23
Chapter 5: FINDINGS BY COMPONENTS
Intended Outcome as stated in the Country Programme Results and Resource Framework:
3.2. Strengthened public administration at all levels that exercises efficient, accountable and
inclusive governance.
Outcome indicators as stated in the Country Programme Results and Resources
Framework, including baseline and targets:
Outcome 3.2. Indicator: Progress in civil service reform.
Outcome 3.2. Baseline: Law on public administration is not adopted.
Outcome 3.2. Target: Comprehensive strategy in place for civil service reform and shift towards
Result Based Management.
Applicable Key Result Area (from 2008-11 Strategic Plan) E:
Poverty reduction and achievement MDG / Promoting inclusive growth, gender equality and
achievement of the MDGs. Provisional Corporate Outcome: MDG-based national development
strategies promote growth and employment, and reduce economic, gender and social
inequalities.
Output I:
Improved policymaking that promotes inclusive employment.
Output baseline:
1.1. Weak capacities of civil servants (including use of ICT) for informed decision making.
Output Indicator:
1.1. Functioning website of MLSPP G to C and G to B with online depository of employment
related documents, full information on employment and social protection policies and
mehnat.uz on-line employment service.
The project has allocated significant resources in developing a new employment service database
for the MLSP. It ensures simplification of business processes within the Ministry and its
regional branches, real-time monitoring of work of 192 centres for employment support
and social protection of population on employment issue, getting real-time data on labour
market (number of jobs in different sectors of economy, level of unemployment, number of
job-seekers in different districts, etc.).The database also gives all relevant information
concerning vacancies and jobseekers in the whole country. The regional centers and the central
office of the employment service have been equipped with the needed hardware. 500 MLSP
employees have been trained in the use of the new database and a new methodology for
provision of employment service was likewise developed within the framework of the project.
A new official web-site - mehnat.uz - has been developed with the MLSP. The new site gives
direct access to the above mentioned vacancies database and a jobseeker can apply for a vacancy
through the site or get the contact information of the employers and contact the employer
directly. The site also contains all relevant legal and administrative information concerning
employment and the labour market in general. The site gives access to a list of NCO providing
social services. By ultimo December 2013 more than 400 organizations are listed.
The site is open for feedback from citizens on services provided by the ministry or its local
branches. An eventual complaint can be filed electronically.
24
The MLSP database and web-site have only been functioning a few months so it is too early to
judge how efficient it will be and to what extent it will make the work of the regional
employment services more efficient. By ultimo December some 70.000 vacancies were listed;
there is however still no statistical information on how long the vacancies have been open and to
what extent the period people are searching for a job has been shortened.
The PD suggested that the on-line employment system should be piloted in three regions with
different access rights, including to NGO’s. The MLSP decided to role the system out to the
whole country without piloting it over longer time in selected regions. NGO’s do not have
special access rights to the system as it is now.
The sustainability of this intervention will very much depend on how many resources the MLSP
is ready to allocate to keep the database up-dated. The Minister has decided to hire 9 extra staff
to secure the functioning and updating of database and site.
Evaluator comment:
The Evaluator expresses his concern, that there seems to be no clear criteria in place for the
listening of the social service providers. Such criteria should be put in place and the list
shortened as for the user it might be quite confusing to get a list of 400 organizations. On the
mid-term should a certification be put in place for social service providers to secure quality and
professionalism in the services offered through this official site of the ministry. It is very positive
that the feedback option on the site can be used to complaint on-line about the services of social
service providers and others.
The on-line employment system contains sensitive personal information solutions for securing
confidentiality should therefore be put in place. This issue will become even more relevant if
non-governmental structures will be allowed to operate on this market.
Output baseline:
1.2. Lack of clear mechanisms on involving NGOs in decision making and legislative process (in
employment and social policy
sectors).
Output Indicator:
1.2.1. Existence of participatory process of decision making in employment and social
protection.
The potential of SP on the Uzbek labour market is not fully exploited and the ILO has over the
years questioned the independency of the social partners and efficiency of implementation of
labour legislation and both general and collective agreements. Uzbekistan and the ILO have
likewise had a number of controversies concerning violation of Core and Ratified conventions. It
is generally recognized that the current SP on the Uzbek labour market has not in full used its
potential and it is by many stakeholders seen as relatively weak. There exists a danger that the
new SP institutions as they will be more streamlined and have more resources available and by
that likely to become more efficient than existing structures will take over functions from these.
According to the FTUU do the trade unions not see any threat from the new SP concept, they
feel confident that the existing system of social dialog will continue. The legislation gives them
the possibility to negotiate working conditions at all levels. Also the CoC feel confident that the
social dialog in the traditional tri-partite format will continue in parallel to the new SP concept.
A number of Public Councils have already been established to participate in the development of
policy papers and new legislation and to secure the link between the civil society and the
25
Government, ministries and authorities. Two councils are directly relevant to the current project
– one working with issues linked to PWD’s and one working on employment and social
protection – it is the latter which has the lead in developing the new legislation on SP. There is
no legal framework in place defining the competency and mandate of the Public Councils, it will
be of utmost importance to get this in place at the soonest the more so as the President has
indicated that the Public Councils in the future will be given the task of controlling the work of
public institutions.
A study tour to Belgium gave good inspiration to representatives from relevant ministries and the
committee working on the development of the new law on SP.
Positive trends can be noticed in the involvement of civil society in the legislative work, within
the framework of the project activities have more than 20 NGO’s been involved in developing
six legal or regulative documents.
A new Presidential Decree dated 12.12.2013 makes it much cheaper and easier for NGO’s to
register. The political leadership of the country is aiming at a greater involvement of the civil
society in the public control with the work of the authorities. A partnership between the
Government and the third sector is very much needed to achieve this and secure a qualified
interaction between the parties. There is a need for increasing the capacity of the social partners
in the field of evaluation and monitoring.
The system in place where NCO’s have to compete to get grants and/or state orders on services
is helping to secure better quality of the work and secure that the NCO’s are meeting their
obligations towards the end beneficiaries. It is the strategy to move away from subsidizing civil
society institutions and in the future move towards grants and state orders. It is the PFP which
solely decide whom to support, there is no interference from the side of the Government or
Presidential Administration on how to distribute the resources allocated to the fund.
The PD indicates that the project should strengthen the networking among the NGO’s working
with PWD’s and also a network for organizations supporting women in difficult situations
should be developed. The network among disabled’s NGO’s has been established and seems to
be well functioning and having a positive impact on the work of the NGO’s. It was decided by
the project management not to try to establish a women’s NGO’s network as the work of the
Women’s Committee is rather efficient and all relevant NGO’s already for many years have been
working through this structure.
Evaluator comment:
The existence of a well functioning women’s committee could have been foreseen already during
the project design.
1.2.2.Existence of Law “On social partnership” or legislative documents to regulate involving
civil society indecision-making and legislative process.
The development of a new law on social partnership has been a rather resource demanding part
of the project and the development has taken longer than it originally was foreseen in the PD.
During project design there might have been a slightly too optimistic view on the speed of the
democratic processes and the time consuming process of the required legal and financial
analysis of a new law in all relevant ministries and other institutions. The new law is however
now technically ready for adoption and is just awaiting the final approval by parliament, foreseen
to take place before the end of the project (March 2014).
26
The new Law on Social Partnership does not view SP though the traditional economic lenses, but
takes a far broader approach to social partnership. SP is traditionally used as a tool to avoid
social and economic conflicts on the labour market. Historically was the institution developed as
a contra weight to class struggle. SP is defined in a number of international conventions among
others the ILO Constitution backed by Convention 87 and 98. 6
IESP project staff has played a leading role in helping the law under way. A Public Council was
set up under the PFP to work on the development of the new law. The council is headed by the
President of the Trade Union Federation and has also active participation of the Chamber of
Commerce. The composition of the council should help to avoid confusion on the terminology
and an understanding among all stakeholders that the new social partnership approach should not
be seen as being in contradiction to the existing SP institutions.
The definition of SP used in the new law says: social partnership – interaction between nongovernmental non-commercial organizations, state bodies (decision making and implementing)
and also structures representing business on development implementing of agreed socialeconomical policy, implementation of programs for social-economical development, solving
humanitarian problems, protection of rights, freedom and interests of different layers of the
country’s population.
The new SP law is foreseen to become a cornerstone in the further development of the Uzbek
society in a democratic and inclusive direction. The role of civil society can be significantly
increased at all levels of decision making and public control as the law will be implemented. The
Public Councils which already today exists in a number of areas (incl. areas covered by the IESP
project) will get significant more competencies and when the new concept is fully rolled out
apparently also significant resources made available. It is foreseen to introduce Public Council
institutions at all levels of the society. Today the Councils are functioning among others under
the patronage of the PFP, but with no solid legal fundament. For the further development of this
institution it will be crucial to have a clear definition of procedures for establishment and
enrolment in to the Councils as well as clear definitions of rights and obligations incl. limitations
for intervention.
Evaluator comment:
An expertise of the draft law conducted by experts in International Labour Standards could have
improved the law and secured against contradiction with international obligations Uzbekistan has
taken on itself.
It can be expected, that the traditional Mahalla as an institution traditionally regulating most
local issues will feel itself under pressure with the adoption of the new SP legislation it will be
essential to establish a dialog and interaction between the Public Councils and the Mahalla.
Output baseline:
2.1. Insufficient research on gender issues in employment in Uzbekistan
Output Indicator:
2.1.1. # of research papers/policy briefs on gender and employment issues
The project developed a very comprehensive analysis on gender aspects of employment (supply
and demand on the labour market). The project management succeeded in involving the partners
first of all the MLSP in the development of the analysis. It is to be seen as a major achievement
that very senior staff and even the Minister himself provided comments to the document and the
Ministry put its logo on the final document even though it contains critical conclusions on
women’s employment opportunities in Uzbekistan. The involvement of government officials and
6C087
- Freedom of Association and Protection of the Right to Organise Convention, 1948 (No. 87)
C098 - Right to Organise and Collective Bargaining Convention, 1949 (No. 98)
27
other partners in the development of the document has increased the awareness and prepared the
ground for further initiatives towards gender mainstreaming.
The PD did foresee activities in the field of home employment for women, these activities were
not implemented.
The PD did foresee research in the field of GDP and women’s employment, this research was not
conducted.
2.1.2. state policies and programmes incorporate gender issues and use sex-disaggregated data
On the basis of the above mentioned analysis was a new methodology for development of
employment programmes incl. gender aspects developed. This new methodology is currently in
the process of being agreed in the government.
The project managed to get certain elements of sex-aggregated data mentioned in the annual
employment report, but still not in full appliance with international recognized standards. The
employment service has been obliged to gather gender aggregated data and the MLSP database
now also contains such information.
The PD did foresee training activities on gender, gender analysis and gender aspects of
employment these activities were not implemented, but the project management did coach
ministerial officers on gender issues and the above mentioned document development process
became for the participants a learning and awareness raising process in itself.
Evaluator comment:
The Evaluator understands that the justification for the Project Board's decision on hiring an ICT
Specialist instead of a Gender Specialist was the high work load on development and
implementation of the new MLSP database. Even the project staff has managed to implement a
number of high quality gender activities and through these increased the awareness among
stakeholders on the importance of gender, leading to inclusion of gender issues in to MLSP
documents, could the engagement of a Gender Specialist properly have moved the issue even
further up on the agenda. The Evaluator understands that some local partners might not have
been very much interested in given priority to gender related issues when the project
implementation started, but as the subject was included in the PD as a rather important indicator
and an issue that is to be mainstreamed in all UNDP activities should there be a strong
justification for not giving the issue maximum attention. The project document set out that a key
beneficiary group would be women in difficult situations of life. These have been among main
beneficiaries and received assistance among others through shelters, but these activities should
be brought in to a broader gender context.
The increased awareness created during the current project opens up for positive outcomes of a
possible new project on gender aspects of employment.
Output baseline:
3.1. Need for analytical research on employment and social services for vulnerable groups
Output Indicator:
3.1. # of research papers/policy briefs published
The project has produced a long list of research materials and policy briefs. These papers have in
general been of high quality and underlined the high professional level of project staff and
collaborators. The papers have been highly appreciated by many project partners and have
created the basis for further policy development especially for initiatives taken by the MLSP.
Foreseen papers on labour protection and rehabilitation were not developed.
A newly published analysis of the non-governmental providers of social services is pointing to a
number of bottle necks in the social service system and specifically to some of the obstacles for
private actors to enter the market.
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The analysis shows that in general are the public service providers more efficient, have better
quality control and are even in some cases less bureaucratic than NCO’s providing the same
services. It also points to some moments where the public system could be improved ex. a more
streamlined division of work between ministries and other authorities. The NCO’s need
according to the analysis capacity building and a higher degree of professionalism in their work.
The government is aiming at transferring more social services to the private sector. This will
require that a certification of providers and a well functioning monitoring system are put in
place. The analysis is pointing to a number of initiatives to be taken for the further development
of private sector engagement in providing social services, it also points to some of the limitation
ex. is there a tendency among NCO’s to focus on clients with not too demanding needs. Clients
needing intensive care are normally not handled by private sector.
The analysis gives good background information for development of a new project on social
services, it confirms the need for further interventions in this field.
Evaluator comment:
It would be extremely important in the further development of a legal framework for social
services to secure a rights based approach.
The conducted analysis and other materials dealing with social service related issues are using
countries like USA and Britain as examples for how the system can work, but these are countries
with a long tradition for private sector engagement and a totally different set-up of the whole
public sector. It might be more relevant to look in to the experiences of countries with a tradition
for public run social services now moving towards more private sector engagement ex. CIS or
Scandinavian countries. In these countries transition experience is available. Countries in which
the public sector has plaid a less important role, would not have such experience.
Output baseline:
3.2. Low public awareness on labour rights and labour protection
Output Indicator:
3.2. # of media products covering labour rights and social protection
The project has conducted trainings for journalists and competition on best materials about
disabled persons, their problems and potentials. These initiatives have lead to the publication of
dozens of materials in newspapers, journals and internet platforms. All partners and stakeholders
are highly appreciating the initiatives taken by the project towards the mass media as these have
helped to increase the awareness among decision makers at all levels and in the public at large
about rights based social protection.
A newly published booklet on labour rights can be a valuable instrument for professionals and
semi-professionals in protecting workers rights. The booklet has a format that is appealing more
to professionals than to the public at large, but as it contents elaborations on interpretations of
certain conflicting issues from the site of Ministry of Justice and MLSP will it be of great interest
for persons dealing with these issues on a daily basis.
Even before reading the final version of the booklet has the FTUU expressed their readiness to
re-print and otherwise further distribute the brochure for their own means.
Surely Labour Inspectors and other professionals will make good use of this material.
The booklet can become a very useful tool in protecting workers’ rights even though the issues
covered are not straightforward in line with the logic of the project. The awareness about rights
has a prominent place in the PD and in that way the promotion of workers’ rights fits well in.
Intended Outcome as stated in the Country Programme Results and Resource Framework:
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1.2. Increased employment opportunities and economic security for vulnerable groups
Outcome indicators as stated in the Country Programme Results and Resources Framework,
including baseline and targets:
Outcome 1.2 Indicator: Number of poor communities who benefit from increased employment
opportunities, as well as improved access to microfinance, business advisory facilities and basic
social services
Outcome 1.2 Baseline: 200
Outcome 1.2 Target: 500
Applicable Key Result Area (from 2008-11 Strategic Plan) E:
Poverty reduction and achievement MDG / Promoting inclusive growth, gender equality and
achievement of the MDGs. Provisional Corporate Outcome: MDG-based national development
strategies promote growth and employment, and reduce economic, gender and social
inequalities
Output II
Increased employment opportunities and access to social services for vulnerable women and
persons with disabilities at community level through involvement of NGOs
Output baseline:
4.1. Weak capacity of NGOs in provision of vocational training and social services
Output indicator:
4.1. # of vulnerable women and persons with disabilities employed with assistance of NGOs and
Employment Promotion Centers
The PD is talking about job creation for PWD’s, but it has been the position of project staff that
it was not an aim of the project to increase the employment among this group of people in
general. According to the project staff should the project only create the basis for involvement of
NCO’s in employment creation and employment service.
Although many jobs are created in Uzbekistan the unemployment rate is still relatively high
especially among young people. There still seems still to be some problems in the field of
payment of unemployment benefits even though progress has been noticed over recent years.
There are around 600.000 registered unemployed, but only 30.000 are receiving unemployment
benefits. The Evaluator was informed that money not always is available at the local level for
paying out the benefits and the unemployed are therefore met with bureaucratic obstacles to
delay the payment.
For a possible future intervention in this field should it be recommended to reinforce a rights
based approach to unemployment benefits for all who meet the requirements set out by law.
Many young people have never had a job and the experience from other countries tells that these
young people are to be seen as socially disabled and not employable. For this group is skills
development not sufficient they need support in the first months of employment. Nestor
arrangements where elderly workers help the young people to get in to working life routine have
proven rather successful. CER is in support of such an approach.
Under the MLSP are two special colleges for disabled young people in place. In these do the
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young people get a full scale 3-year professional education. In connection with the
implementation of the IESP project the MLSP became aware of the fact that there also was a
special college functioning under the Ministry of Higher and Middle Special Education, but here
the students only got a 2-year professional education. This college has now been transferred to
the MLSP and a full scale 3-year education has been put in place. The MLSP special colleges
have a very high success rate, 95% of the students get employment after finishing the college.
This development can be seen as an unexpected, but very important success for the IESP project.
All enterprises with more than 20 employees are by law obliged to employ no less than 3% of
PWD’s. All interviewees were well aware of this regulation, but all also confirmed that the law
is not implemented in full. Statistics show that only around 50% of the potential vacancies are
filled by PWD’s. Different reasons for this are given by stakeholders. Some see this as a hard
business calculation by some employers, it is cheaper for them to pay a small fine, than investing
in improved accessibility or whatever might be needed to invite PWD’s to work in an enterprise.
Other stakeholders explain the violations by the fact that incentives to employ PWD’s are too
small ex. are tax benefits in place contradictory to other legislation and not very logic in their
structure. According to the CoC are the administrative regulations for PWD employees so
complicated that many entrepreneurs refrain from employing PWD’s.
The FTUU is aware of the problem with the lack of implementation of the legislation in this field
and their labour inspectors give recommendations to the enterprises to apply the law, but in their
view they do not have any access to sanctioning the employers.
The Chamber of Commerce together with other traditional social partners has a very positive
experience from establishing tri-partite councils linked to vocational training centres these
councils recommends to the institution what professions and skills the local labour market is in
need of. This approach secures a much higher employability of the students when finishing
college and at the same time it minimizes the skills deficit which often exists on the labour
market in a specific region. The councils also function as a public control that the standard of the
education is appropriate and that the allocated financial resources are used efficiently.
Women and some categories of PWD’s are excluded from the labour market because of work
place attestations and/or outdated professional requirements many of the state regulations in this
sphere are dated back to Soviet time and have not been up-dated since then. Meaning that the
description of many professions is based on a totally different technological environment and
many professions and work places that earlier for different reasons were seen as hazardous today
with the implementation of new technology are fully safe and could be accessed by women and
groups of disabled which were excluded earlier. The CoC and the FTUU are very much in
support of a review of the regulations. This is however an extremely resource demanding
exercise. A review of professions is under way in a number of other former USSR countries and
coordination, exchange of information and findings would be extremely helpful to all and could
help to speed up the process which otherwise can take many years.
The current system of evaluation of a person’s ability to work is according to both FTUU and
CoC not sufficient. The VTEK take a purely medical approach without having insight in the
possibilities and limitations there are in a specific enterprise and/or profession. UNICEF is in
agreement that there is space for improvement in this sphere, they suggest involvement of PWD
related organizations in the assessment of work places/professions. The CoC suggest that the
enterprises investment in training of PWD’s should be exempted from taxation.
To increase the employability of PWD’s is education a key issue. UNICEF is promoting
inclusive education with a certain success, they find that the responsibility for vocational training
should be moved from the MLSP to the Ministry of Higher and Middle Specialized Education,
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this to secure a comprehensive and full circle 12-years basic education.
The Evaluator visited the specialized college in Samarkand and the students from this college are
practically solely being employed in local SE’s. The practical part of the education in the college
is run at the SE (IESP pilot) linked to the college. After working for sometime in the SE the
PWD’s normally move on and become employed in municipal service enterprises or start their
own small business.
The young people are not only physically disabled when they come to the college they are also to
a big extent socially disabled as they are not used to have any obligations towards the
surrounding society.
The college visited educates shoemakers, sewers and radio- and TV-technicians. The Evaluator
did not have the possibility to go through the curricula and training materials and could therefore
only assess the education level based on talks with teachers, employer (SE) and the visual
impression of the practical part of the training. Whereas the training of shoemakers seems to
have a relative adequate standard, the education of radio- and TV-technicians seems to be
somehow outdated, as all equipment is very old.
The girls are trained in production of souvenirs and sewing. They are after finalizing college
apparently mainly working at home. The IESP project is aiming at increasing inclusive
employment, it can be questioned to what extend work at home can be seen as inclusive
employment for the women in question it could easily end up becoming exclusive employment.
Statistical information on the work life development of the girls finalizing college was not
available.
One of the pilot projects providing employment service could report that in average 13 persons
are contacting their service per months for assistance. This in a region with 5.500 PWD’s and a
reported high employment rate among these. The pilot had introduced Case Management but it
was hard for them to provide statistics documenting their efforts, when requested by the
Evaluator. The job centre has been confronted with the problem that many PWD’s do not want to
accept the job offers provided. Out of 17 persons the job centre got employed in private
enterprises did only 7 accept the job.
The job centre did not have a clearly defined target group when the pilot project started this has
emerged during the project implementation. The staff providing consultation services in the job
centre has thanks to the project been trained in new consultation methodologies. They have all a
higher education grade, but not in the field of consultations. The job centre is following the
PWD’s they get employed in private enterprises. The consultants are visiting them at their
workplace after one month, after three months and finally after six months.
The job centre is closely linked with the local sewing and souvenir producing SE, which also is a
pilot of the project. It is employees of the SE who conduct the practical training in the job centre.
The sewing machines used for training in the job centre are provided by the UNDP, these will by
the end of the project be handed over to the job centre and it is expected that the local authorities
will help the job centre with skills development in the future. The trainers conducting the
practical training in the centre are all skilled workers who have received additional pedagogical
training.
The staff of the job centre recognizes themselves that they need further training in job placement
and consultation techniques.
A number of activities were foreseen in the sphere of business start-up training for people from
vulnerable groups, but these activities were cancelled as the project did not have anything special
to offer.
A study tour to Hungary was organized within the framework of the project. None of the
interviewed persons had participated in and/or referred to the study tour. According to the project
32
management Hungary was chosen by governmental partners because of very similar conditions,
very similar institutional framework and good success in development of CSOs. Main focus was
on social partnership and it was the working group drafting the new Law on Social Partnership
who participated in the tour. The quality of the draft law was according to the project
management improved thanks to the study tour.
The project seems to have played a leading role in pushing for changes in the labour market
legislation removing the state monopoly on employment service. This was initiated to open up
for NGO’s entering the employment service market. The new legislation does not foresee any
certification or licensing for those who will enter the market. The experience from other
countries tells than even in countries with a stabile and well organized labour market has the
opening of the employment service market for private actors been a complicated issue. It is of
concern if the Uzbek labour market would be ready for a privatization of the employment
services at this stage.
Evaluator comment:
The Evaluator finds that the project management took a wise decision cancelling the activities in
the field of business start-up. It is better to cancel such activities than to offer sub-standard
and/or non-relevant activities. Many other projects in the world could learn from this!
The project took a big moral responsibility on its shoulders by promoting the opening of the
employment services for private actors. From neighbouring countries it is known that the labour
markets not have been ready for phenomena like out-staffing, agency work etc. The Evaluator
recommend to the project management and social partners interviewed during the mission to be
very careful when opening up the employment service market for private actors this to minimize
possible negative outcomes.
Post mission was the Evaluator informed that the amendments of the employment service
legislation had been withdrawn from the parliament’s agenda.
Output baseline:
4.2. Insufficient number of employment and social services rendered to vulnerable women and
PWD
Output indicator:
4.2. # of social services available for vulnerable women and PWD
The project document did foresee development of activities in the field of provision of social
services to vulnerable women and PWD’s. Nevertheless it became provision of social services to
elderly people living alone which became the flagship of the project.
In general it can be noticed that before the IESP project started was social services not very high
on the political agenda and that CSO’s should deal with this was not an issue at all. Today the
issue is constantly on the agenda of the Government. Regulations are being developed for
monitoring and follow-up and there is at the same time a growing interest in the civil society in
getting involved in this work. The project has played a leading role in promoting this
development.
The project took an innovative approach to mobilizing funds for NCO’s offering social services.
A competition was launched together with the PFP and the winners got grants with a 75%
contribution from the PFP and 25% from the IESP project budget.
The Government seems interested in transferring more social services to private providers such
as NCO’s, this requests strong and objective criteria for needs assessment and quality of
provided services.
33
In figures have 5.000 people from vulnerable groups received assistance, 400 have received
complex assistance and 300 have been employed. By this has the project met its quantitative
targets.
In the view of UNICEF should efforts be made to improve the education of social workers.
Currently there is an academic education of social workers but this has its background in
preparing specialists to work on organizing cultural mass activities rather than social services. In
addition to this there exists a four months skills upgrading/ re-orientation for people who want to
become specialists in the field of social services. UNICEF finds it problematic that three
different ministries are dealing with the issues of PWD’s. There is a need to develop a joint
platform for education of social workers and other employees dealing with the provision of
social services.
UNICEF did not have any direct involvement with UNDP on the current project but could see
shelters as a field for joint intervention as many women would come to the shelters with their
children.
The IESP project has with great success implemented Case Management in the pilot projects
providing social services. This has according to all stakeholders given a significant lift in quality,
efficiency and targeting of the services. The MLSP is so satisfied with the results that the
methodology will be rolled out to the whole country. The IESP project staff is currently in the
process of finalizing the methodological instruments and training materials to be used for this
process.
The IESP project has supported the MLSP in developing their web-site and it now contains a list
of more than 400 NCO’s providing social services.
The FTUU is very much supportive towards the projects initiatives to provide social services to
elderly people. The unions have some 40.000 members who are pensioners. The FTUU would be
ready to raise the issue of a company’s responsibility for financing assistance to elderly former
employees, who are in need for assistance at home, during the next collective agreement
negotiation campaign. The CoC would look positively to such a demand from the workers side.
The shelter for women in difficult situations in Samarkand has earlier been working with the
UNDP and has been used to receive many foreign grants, when the legislation allowed for this.
The shelter provided the Evaluator with strong documentation for the work they are doing to
help women in need. They highly appreciated the Case Management skills they have obtained
through the trainings conducted within the framework of the IESP project. This new approach
has made their work much more efficient. The shelter staff have themselves adjusted the
standard documents and forms they received from the UNDP so that they fit to their needs, but
the methodology now used is the one provided by the project.
The NCO running the shelter is well known in the community and the authorities from the whole
region are sending women in need to the shelter. The women are helped to get on with their lives
through education and jobs or pension if so required. When the NCO had many grants they had
16 branches in different parts of the region, now only the shelter, which is run with the support
from the IESP, the PFP and local sponsors, is left. The PFP is only financing the salaries of the
staff.
After the NCO lost the access to foreign grants was the level of activities almost down to zero,
but thanks to the IESP has the organization been revitalized. The project helped them to apply
for a grant from PFP and now they are in full scale activity again. They plan to establish a SE
and through this provide social/medical services to elderly people in need. It is planned to start
up trainings for social workers with the assistance of health centres, hospitals and local education
34
centres. These social workers will get basic medical skills so that they can offer a broader
spectrum of services.
The fact that the shelter can flag that they are supported by UNDP is increasing their authority in
the community significantly.
Once a month are trainings conducted in the pilot projects besides this they are visited by project
staff every 2-3 weeks for consultations and practical assistance. All the representatives for pilot
social service providers highly appreciated the opportunity they have had for discussing their
problems, share information and knowledge and get inspiration for development of new
initiatives during meetings with the colleagues from pilot projects in other regions even though
these might be providing social services in another field. The meetings and the training
conducted in connection with these were highly appreciated by the participants.
Every social worker in the MLSP social service department in Kharshi is according to the head
of the department in average assisting 8-10 pensioners and each pensioner is normally given
assistance 2 times 3 hours per week. This would mean a working week of 48-60 hours for the
social workers! According to the rules of the Ministry of Finance can elderly people in towns
receive assistance 2 hours per week and elderly in the villages 3 hours per week. The staff are
providing assistance in all aspects of life food, cleaning, shopping, writing letters etc.
35% of the staff have a pedagogical background the rest are bookkeepers and clerks. There is
very low flow of staff all social workers have been working for more than 8 years in the
department. The Department seems to be run very much on inertia and besides the methodology
of Case Management which has been introduced by the project has the department not taken
much on board from the project.
The department would like to give their staff some basic medical education, so that the scope of
services they can offer the elderly people can be broadened.
The IESP projects pilot NCO social service provider in Kharshi was originally established to
fight for people’s social and economic rights. Later the organization established a social service
which is providing assistance to lonely disabled and elderly persons in their homes. This service
is financed by the local authorities and they decide on the basis of objective criteria how many
hours can be allocated to each person in need. The NCO itself does not receive any support from
the authorities, only from the IESP and local sponsors.
Besides the social service does the NCO also provide legal assistance to secure the social rights
of the elderly and disabled persons. They find it important to increase people’s awareness about
their rights. Even though the NCO is standing up for their clients’ rights are they in good
understanding with the local authorities.
The social workers are helping the elderly with medication, but do not make injections. The
experienced social workers are now training the new comers, but a formal education for social
worker assistants is according to the NCO very much in need.
As a new service are they now also offering assistance to people who have become homeless.
The NCO expect to receive a grant from PFP in 2014, but the grants from the PFP can only
cover up to 40% of an organizations budget. They are considering to provide paid services to
elderly people in the future to gain a certain overhead.
The NCO leadership is very much satisfied with the assistance and support they receive within
the IESP project. Project staff is visiting them every 2-3 weeks. The Case Management has
helped them to streamline their work and optimize the efficiency. The NCO seems to be
convinced about the sustainability of the services being provided to elderly and disabled persons.
The activities in Kharshi have somehow become a model for others and inspiration for the IESP
project management on provision of social services to elderly people living alone.
35
The PD did foresee activities which should lead to development of new VTEK standards for
employability of disabled persons. The project management in understanding with the partners
decided not to initiate these activities as it was understood by all partners that this would be an
unrealistic task within the given timeframe and budget.
Within the framework of the IESP is a manual developed, which will be used by the MLSP for
education of social workers.
Today is a number of activities linked to social services based on grants from the PFP, this bears
in itself a number of problems: there seems not to be clear and objective criteria for allocating
the grants in place, as there are more NCO’s applying for grants than money available is it likely
that one NCO will not get a grant in two following years, this means that the services started will
stop after one year, when the grant comes to an end. The elderly get used to a service provided
by a certain staff. For the elderly person is continuity and stability surrounding the social
services provided in their homes very important. As a consequence of the current financing
model will the assistance to elderly people in their homes not be rights based, but depending on
which NCO get the grant in a given year. The Evaluator finds this problematic especially in the
view that the Government apparently plans to further develop the concept and broaden it to other
spheres.
Evaluator comment:
Low flow of staff is extremely important in the social services sphere and it should be
recommended to study the experience from the MLSP social service department in Kharshi and
if possible spread this experience out to other service providers.
The Evaluator sees at the least three issues of concern in the current social service set-up: 1) The
level of education of social workers, there are today no formal criteria in place; 2) The provision
of social services for the most vulnerable groups is not rights based and a certain group of people
who are de facto but not de jure alone are not entitled to social services; 3) Seems problematic
that some NCO’s which have been used to have good foreign funding under the current
conditions want to earn money by providing social services, this can contradict their status as a
non-commercial organization.
As mentioned elsewhere should the list of professions where PWD’s and women do not have
access be revised. It would make sense that besides the labour inspection and relevant NGO’s
also the VTEK became involved in this work.
With the expansion of private sector involvement in the social service sector it will be crucial to
secure that educational standards are in place and the providers and their staff are certified. It
will likewise be important to increase the awareness among people in need of social services
about their rights.
Output baseline:
5.1. Absence of methodological framework for SEs
Output indicator:
5.1. Existence of methodological framework for SEs
The project has conducted an analysis of the legal, economical and social framework the SE’s
are functioning within in Uzbekistan. This analysis will create the background for development
of proposals for a new methodological framework aiming at optimizing the potential of the SE’s.
The activities implemented for promoting Social Enterprises have been among the most visible.
This is despite the fact that this part of the project has suffered from flow of experts and lack of
qualified candidates, such a situation cannot but have a negative impact on the implementation
and the realistically expected impact. The project management recognises that in the process of
implementation a number of mistakes were made, but they state to have found a way forward.
36
The pilot enterprises were not selected within the current project. They were all established
within the framework of the previous ACCESS project and the support continued in the new
project without a deeper review of needs and sustainability at the start of the project.
The UNDP Economical Unit expressed concern about the sustainability of the pilot SE’s.
According to the experts have the pilot SE’s been supported to make them visible, but it looks
like a “Potemkin” stunt.
There are a number of rather complicated tax exemption and reduction schemes in place for SE’s
functioning under NCO’s these are however according to all economists interviewed not been
able to give any real benefits to these organizations as they in many cases are contradictory to
each other. It is for these SE’s more profitable to be registered as “small enterprises”.
The SE did not have access to actual business plans for the SE’s, only a rather old plan for the
development of one of the enterprises was available in Russian. This plan had however no
indication of the intention of becoming a SE, it was a regular business plan for the start-up of a
small enterprise. According to project staff have more up-dated plans been developed, these are
clearly defining the pilot enterprises as SE’s.
During the project implementation it became clear that the SE’s needed assistance on legal and
bookkeeping related issues. An analysis of the administrative procedures within the pilot SE’s
proved a number of violations of administrative rules. The project management took immediate
action and even such an activity was not foreseen in the PD, a lawyer and an expert in
bookkeeping/administrative procedures were made available for the pilot enterprises. The
enterprises are now visited by the experts 1-2 times per month to secure that all procedures are
followed in accordance with laws and regulations.
It is of concern that the SE management did not get sufficient training on administrative issues
earlier in the project (or maybe even in the previous project). Especially as the violations of
administrative rules discovered during the analysis conducted by the project turned out to be so
severe that they could have been charged according to the Criminal Code. Thanks to the prompt
intervention from the project management these violations seems now to be history and sound
procedures are in place. All the pilot SE’s have been re-registered with new bylaws, which meet
the legal requirements for SE’s. It is however the Evaluators impression, that the enterprises still
are very much dependent of the “soft”- assistance from the project. The pilot SE’s have now
been assisted in different ways by two UNDP projects (ACCESS and IESP) it seems to be timely
to consider an exit strategy. The current assistance is very convenient for the SE’s, but they have
to generate incomes so that they themselves can cover costs of legal and administrative
assistance.
The number of SE’s is increasing and the Government foresee this sector to grow in the years to
come, especially in the field of social services as more and more task are foreseen to be moved
from the public sector to the NCO sector. It is likely that the non-pilot SE’s would have the same
problems with administrative issues as the pilot enterprises, it should therefore be considered to
establish a regionally based service for these enterprises to help them to overcome these
challenges, such a service could in itself be a SE.
The analysis of the SE’s conducted within the IESP project shows that NCO’s in Uzbekistan get
only 11,3% of their incomes from commercial activities whereas the average in the world is
40%.
The CoC would like to see the SE’s placed in a special category of enterprises as their needs and
possibilities are very much different from those of other enterprises. The tax benefits for SE’s are
according to the CoC not sufficient and the regulations are in some cases in contradiction with
each other.
80% of all public procurement orders are given to SME’s to support SE’s a quota of these 80%
could be allocated to SE’s. Today Uzbek enterprises are given a 20% advantage (when
competing with foreign enterprises) on prizes in public tenders the CoC would look positive
37
towards giving SE’s a higher advantage maybe 30 or 40%. Further tax exemptions could
according to the CoC also be considered ex. could the SE’s be freed from property taxes and
others. The CoC would very much want to see the SE’s to develop further both in quantity and
quality.
It would be essential in a coming project to involve the CoC in the further development of SE’s.
The CoC has expressed willingness to share their expertise and assist in the strengthening of
SE’s.
The FTUU is like the CoC very much supportive towards the development of SE’s, they would
like to further develop their own rehabilitation centres as SE’s with the assistance of UNDP.
The management of the SE’s visited by the Evaluator expressed great satisfaction with the
assistance received from the project on bookkeeping and legal issues. As the legislation is
changing all the time and new regulations come in place there will be a continued need for
assistance from the project experts on these issues.
The project conducted a design review of the products being produced by the SE’s. This review
came out extremely critical for most of the products, because of bad design, low quality of
materials and lack of manufacture skills. Detailed advice for improvement was provided to the
enterprises in question. A follow-up review would show if the recommendations provided have
been taken on-board.
An unforeseen success of the project was that it succeeded in getting one of the larger
supermarket chains to establish a special section for sale of “Social Products” – products
produced at the SE’s - in three of their shops. The sale for the first few months is proving good
progress and the perspectives for continued placement of the products in the shops seem to be
positive. Earlier were the souvenirs mainly sold during charity actions now they reach out to a
large number of potential customers.
Output baseline:
5.2. 9 pilot social enterprises with 170 new jobs 7% of PWD are employed by 220 DPO based
enterprises and these enterprises enjoy tax benefits. Data on women's NGOs and their
contribution in employment is not available, tax benefits for them do not exist.
Output indicator:
5.2. # of new jobs created for vulnerable groups through NGOs
In total some 300 have got employment through the project activities.
An analysis of the work of the pilot employment service has shown that of 18 PWD’s who got
employment in normal enterprises no one were in employment after three months whereas of 25
employed in SE’s all were still in employment after three months.
The IESP project supported 5 SE’s owned by NCO’s of disabled. These pilot SE’s got full scale
support – equipment, machinery, business and skills training, expert assistance on legal and
administrative procedures, promotion of products etc., but after two years of intensive support
only one of them is showing signs of being sustainable. The management of these SE’s
according to the analysis missing the skills needed for running a small enterprise.
The SE visited in Samarkand producing mainly souvenirs and wedding clothes for women, is a
fast expanding enterprise. They have 25 employees all PWD’s by now, but plan with the support
of the local authorities to build a new factory. None of those who have got employment in the
enterprise have ever left. Till now the SE has been registered as a “family business”, but it will
be changed to a shareholders SE, as this seems to the best solution for the time being. The SE has
got strong support from the legal and administrative experts from the IESP project these are also
38
helping them with the re-registration of the company.
Also in the field of improving design and quality has the SE got very strong support from the
IESP project.
The products of this enterprise are now sold as “Social Products” in the above mentioned
supermarket chain, this is for the employees a strong recognition of their work and beside the
financial benefit of this arrangement it is also of strong moral support for the PWD’s.
As the SE is expanding it is confronted with the need to go from small sewing machines to
industrial ones and the incoming staff needs to be trained in using these industrial sewing
machines, but they do not have the resources available for this.
39
Chapter 6: LESSONS LEARNED

People from vulnerable groups incl. women and PWDs have complex needs and face
multiple barriers to inclusion that should be addressed through a comprehensive approach
targeting various areas (e.g., employment training, psychological support, and improving
legislation). One of the key factors is the lack of necessary skills and as a consequence low
employability.

Involvement of CSO’s in the development of reforms of social protection and development
of social partnership has proven essential.

Excellent working relations that the project established with the MLSP and the PFP proved
to be very important for the project’s success.

Physical location of the project office in an institution belonging to the MLSP helped to
create an ownership among ministerial officials, including the Minister himself, but it is to a
certain extend at the cost of less interaction with other UNDP staff.

The project managements flexibility in responding to the demands from MLSP for analytical
materials, including policy commentaries and reviews, inputs into legislation process and
Government Programs’ development ensured its success, but did at the same time leave
planned activities linked to issues like labour protection with less attention.

Implementation of activities linked to development and adoption of new legislation need
long preparation and can often not be handled within one 3-year project circle.

Implementation of such complex elements as social enterprises, employment services and
social services is time and resource consuming.

The awareness on gender related issues is still relatively low in Uzbekistan and there is a
need to find an approach to these issues that creates an increased awareness among both men
and women.
40
Chapter 7: RECOMMENDATIONS
The barriers to social inclusion that people from vulnerable groups face are not static, and the
changes in employment practices, social attitudes, or the environment may help reduce or
eliminate these barriers. To advance the project’s accomplishments in promoting rights of
vulnerable groups, the Evaluator is offering his recommendations that should be seen as no more
than an agenda of possible topics for discussions between national and international
stakeholders.

Individualized rights based approaches to social services to PWDs and elderly people should
be promoted by the project that will cover assessments and a wide range of supports, tailored
to the needs of an elderly person or an individual with disabilities.

Participatory approaches to policy and legislation development and monitoring, involving
CSOs, should be continuously promoted.

The regional/local level needs more targeted attention in conducting country-wide awareness
and capacity building interventions.

It would be timely to develop exit strategies for direct assistance to SE’s. SE support should
be concentrated on legal/administrative assistance and development of a suitable legal
framework incl. incentives for the SE’s.

The practical (bookkeeping) and legal assistance to newly established SE’s and SME’s
employing people from vulnerable groups should be continued, but in another format.

Maintain a proper balance between flexibility and focus on specific results outlined in the
project document. As the demands for project’s supports to vulnerable groups may change,
the project should be able to quickly respond to these opportunities. Plan of project activities,
including Project Organization Structure, could be reviewed together with partners twice a
year to improve project responsiveness.
It is recommended to develop a new project/extend a current one as it remains relevant to UNDP
and Government’s goals in the area of social protection and good governance. The interventions
in these areas can achieve comprehensive and long-term impact if they are designed keeping in
mind the following factors:
 The goals outlined inUNDP Uzbekistan, United Nations Development Assistance Framework
for 2010-2015 and UNDP Uzbekistan, Country Program Action Plan (CPAP) 2010-2015.
 UNDP’s traditional comparative advantages such as being a trusted neutral agent that can
work with Government and CSO’s.
 Complex needs of vulnerable groups that require complex multi-sectoral solutions achieved
through effective collaboration of all partners involved.
 Capacity building needs of all partners involved.
 Possibilities of achieving maximum effect through synergies and collaboration with other
donors.
 Political and economic realities of Uzbekistan.
A new project may include the following components:
41




Support capacity building of the MLSP,
Promote increased employability of vulnerable groups with special focus on women in
difficult life situations and PWD’s,
Support the development of social partnership and new democratic civil society institutions,
Provide assistance in developing a framework for social services targeted at elderly people
living alone.
In addition to these main fields of intervention there is a need for finalizing the work started
within the current project in the field of employment services and workers’ rights.
Future organizational set-up:
The Evaluator recommends broadening the Project Board to include all partners and secure that
the Board get better involved in decision making process.
It should be recommended that a structured and well defined coordination between the different
UNDP units working in the field of social protection is put in place for the implementation of an
eventual future project this to optimize the efficiency and political impact of the planned
interventions.
42
Chapter 8: POTENTIAL COMPONENTS OF A NEW PROJECT
Major changes in the social protection system are being developed by the government, these
changes will impact all types of allowances, pensions and other transfers. UNICEF is involved in
a reform of the child allowances. A reform of the pension system is also under way. These
reforms will be cornerstones in the modernization of the social protection system planned for the
coming years.
According to the Centre for Economic Research (CER), an institution partly financed by UNDP
and by many seen to be relatively close to the Government has their research conducted for
UNICEF that shows that there is a widespread sponger approach among beneficiaries to social
benefits, this goes for all groups of beneficiaries - no special research was conducted on
vulnerable groups.
A new social protection approach is being developed building on Vision 2030 it is the intention
that by 2030 will the current extensive social transfer system be changed to a system targeted on
supporting the objective poor. This group will receive higher transfers and the subjective poor
will be excluded from the system.
Social services are included in the plans for minimizing the number of subjective poor.
According to CER are social transfers to be allocated to families only, not to single persons and
single persons with children.
Today 7,7 % (5,7% cash and 2% in kind (winter cloths, sports dresses to girls, etc)) of the GDP
is used for financing social transfers to poor people.
In parallel to the initiatives taken by the IESP is UNICEF supporting the implementation of a
single registry system for social allowances. According to UNICEF is the Government looking
for ways to minimize social transfers and other expenses related to social protection.
8.1 Support capacity building of the MLSP in provision of vocational education, employment
service and safe jobs.
One of the reasons for the low employability among vulnerable groups in Uzbekistan is
the lack of needed skills among job seekers. The project will pilot one vocational training
centre to provide high level modern vocational training to group of women as part of their
rehabilitation. The skills needed by the local labour market will be defined in close
cooperation with local business (CoC and BWA). A Public Council or tri-partite board
will be established to follow the implementation.
The IESP project allocated significant resources in the strengthening of the employment
services under the MLSP. At the same time did the project support the development of
new legislation in the field of employment services opening up for private actors on the
market. The parliament has taken the issue of the agenda. The process of preparation for
the new amendments to the law has shown that there is a need for an expert review of the
legislation and the functioning of the current employment services. The experience from
neighbouring countries tells that such reforms can have negative impact on the regulation
of the labour market. An expert review of the legislation and a public debate of the
consequences and possible adjustment of legislation could be initiated.
In the IESP project it was foreseen to conduct activities in the field of labour
protection/safe jobs. There is a recognized need to review the list professions from which
women and some groups of disabled persons are excluded. This is a very time consuming
exercise and cooperation with other countries should be recommended and supported.
The project could select two or three professions for review.
43
The project should follow up on the initiatives taken towards gender mainstreaming. If
the increase in gender awareness achieved during the IESP project can be further
developed in a new project would it be realistic on the mid-term to reach out broadly and
get more focus on gender issues.
The project should in consultation with the Ministry of Labour and Social Protection and
other partners find the best possible way to contribute to the implementation of the
roadmap for preparation for ratification of the Convention on the Rights of Persons with
Disabilities.
8.2 Promote employment opportunities and rehabilitation for people from vulnerable groups
incl. PWDs and women in difficult situations.
Employment increases economic self-sufficiency and self-esteem of any individual.
Employment is a key factor in the empowerment and inclusion of people from vulnerable
groups. In reality, however, a significant number of adults with physical, psychological or
social disabilities remain unemployed despite their potential and/or their desire to
contribute to the work force. In Uzbekistan, a high number of persons with disabilities
should be able to enter or re-enter the labour market if supported. There is no doubt that a
better trained and prepared workforce, not dependent on income support, will reduce both
society and individual costs in the long run.
One of the challenges in supporting employment of these groups is that they are not a
homogenous group. They may have had a disability from birth or acquired it in
childhood, their teenage years, later in life, during further education or while in
employment. Their disability may have little impact on their ability to work and or it may
have a major impact, requiring significant supports. There is a need for increasing
capacity in the field of matching the employability of the individual with the possibilities
at a given work place. It should therefore be recommended to educate specialists in this
field. Specialists, who do not take a medical approach only, but also have the needed
psychological and practical (engineering) insight.
A methodology promoting an individualized approach to labour market integration of
PWDs was introduced during the IESP project. As all PWDs are unique in terms of their
strengths and needs, the employment services should move towards individualised
approaches to Case Management that proved to be effective in supporting employment of
PWDs and eliminating social exclusion. The employment services, with the project
support, can move to a practice of development and implementation of “individual action
plans” that will take into account such individual characteristics as age, skills, special
needs and employability. The plans could contain various rehabilitation and work
elements, as well as benefits in cash and kind. The staff of employment service providers
may be assigned with coordination of such necessary actions as identification and
assessment of skills of people with disabilities, locating appropriate jobs, training, and
follow-up with external support, if necessary.
Although the individualised approaches will place a wide range of new demands on
service providers and will require staff to spend more time assisting individuals and
follow each case, it is necessary to pursue as the individualized approaches proved to be
very effective in addressing barriers to labour market inclusion that each individual is
confronted with. The project may support the MLSP further in developing guidelines,
training modules and best practices materials to promote the new model and train staff
how to identify for each client the main obstacles to finding employment, propose
44
specific steps and supports to overcome them and define the person's obligations.
There is a wide range of potential interventions supporting employment of PWDs such as
job coaching and mentoring, pre-employment training and upgrading, post-secondary
education, assistive aids and devices, wage subsidies of employed persons with
disabilities, and workplace supports. Although the current requirement establishing the
quota of employment of persons with disabilities for all enterprises with more than 20
staff, is not a perfect policy instrument, with significant challenges associated with its
enforcement, it should be maintained in the future until new more effective instruments
encouraging employers to hire PWDs are introduced. Initiatives should be taken in a new
project to ensure the enforcement of the current legislation and in a dialog with CoC and
FTUU develop proposals for optimizing the legislation.
8.3 Promotion of social enterprises
As social enterprises apply market-based strategies to achieve a social purpose, this
model can be promising in Uzbekistan. Social enterprises may not only use profit to
support PWDs, but also employ them. The project should continue supporting social
enterprises and monitor their performance to identify lessons learned to inform
policymaking.
The experiences from the IESP project tell that there is a need for continued assistance to
SE’s in the field of legal and administrative assistance. The expertise of CoC could be
used to overcome this problem and by that create a sustainable solution covering the
whole country not only selected pilots.
All stakeholders point to the fact that there is a need for optimizing legislation on tax
exemptions, administrative rules and others for as well SE’s as other enterprises
employing disabled persons. The project could take the lead on conducting such an
expertise and together with relevant stakeholders develop proposals for optimizing
legislation.
An initiative has been taken to sell “Social Products” – products produced by SE’s in
selected super markets. There should also be an option for exporting the products through
international organizations (Fair Trade or similar) or directly to foreign buyers. There is
an export system in place for SME’s the SE’s could join this or set- up their own
association. Export could generate incomes to further develop the SE’s and secure
sustainability. The next project should include an exit strategy for the UNDP from this
field of intervention.
8.4 Development of Social Partnership
The IESP project contributed strongly to the development of the new social partnership
concept and it will in the coming years be a challenge to transform the concept in to real
policy and decision making. Already today SP is seen through the lens of the new
concept, which have great perspectives for further democratisation of the Uzbek society
building on old traditions of decentralization and local self-management. The new
concept involving civil society in decision making and public control can have great
perspectives if developed in the right direction.
The traditional Mahalla system, where a lot of functions formally and/or informally are in
the hands of the local Mahalla council is of cause not meeting normal democratic
standards, but building on these traditions and adding democratic principles through the
modern civil society institutions can be an interesting mix, that can deliver a short-cut to
further democratisation of the society.
45
A new project should select a few pilots linked to the other project activities foreseen in
the project and use the SP concept as a full circle management tool for these activities
and if possible for the project as a whole. This might slow some decision making
processes and require that the relevant partners are in agreement, but it could be an
excellent “school of democracy” for all stakeholders and open for discussions of positive
and negative outcomes of the new concept.
Developing the SP concept should not be on the cost of the traditional SP (tri-partite)
system. It should therefore be recommended that a new project follow-up to the
initiatives taken under the IESP project on protection of worker’s rights, hereunder could
the gender equality agenda be further promoted.
8.5 Social services provision to elderly and disabled people.
Working on developing social services for vulnerable groups the IESP project puts focus
on a group of elderly people who de jure have relatives and by that not are entitled to
certain social services, but de facto they are alone with no one to assist them. This group
has somehow dropped out of the public social protection scheme and the project
contributed to table the problem and secure that NCO’s take on themselves to help these
elderly people. Recently has a court decision enforced that this group has the right to
social services. It would be important for a new project to follow-up to this and ensure
that the services are rights based.
The IESP project developed instruments and methodology for making the work of the
social workers working both in public services and in NCO’s more efficient and increase
the professionalism, but there is a need for further interventions.
The conclusions from the recent analysis conducted by the project is pointing to the need
for developing criteria for the capacity of the NCO’s to be tasked with offering social
services and standards for the quality of the services provided. A new project should give
high priority to follow up on this.
The MLSP want to change profile of their education institute and start educating social
workers. A new project should assist the MLSP in development of curricula, manuals
training of teachers etc. for the new education.
Initiatives should also be taken to secure skills up-grading of the social workers already
engaged in providing social services.
46
CHAPTER 9: ANNEXES
9.1 Questions used during semi-structured interviews
Interview sheet
Case organization: ________________________________________________________
Project activities included in the case, e.g., direct assistance, policy development, information
campaign or network building, etc:
________________________________________________________________________
Total Number of Respondents (individually or as a group)
__________
Total Number of Individual Interviews (in-person or by phone)
__________
Total Number of Group Interviews (interviews with more than one person)
__________
Types of Staff Interviewed (Examples include: UNDP project staff Tashkent, other UNDP
Tashkent staff, Local NGO staff, Local INGO staff , Governmental Representatives, Private
sector partner staff, etc.:
________________________________________________________________________
Total Number of Documents Reviewed
_________
List of all Documents Reviewed (Please provide the title)
________________________________________________________________________
Total Number of Observations: __________
Types of Observations Conducted:
________________________________________________________________________
A. BACKGROUND AND CONTEXT
1. Respondent Levels (based on title)
2. Respondents work responsibilities
3. Types of work done by respondents
(a) Working with government partners to develop employment and social partnership
laws and policies,
(b) Partnering with local NGOs and or INGOs to provide direct assistance (health, legal,
job training, (re-)integration or other supports) to disabled persons,
(c) Collaborating with local or international staff to develop employment possibilities for
disabled persons,
47
(d) Building the capacity of local NGOs or private organizations to identify, assist,
support disabled persons,
(e) Developing networks of partners seeking to increase employment possibilities for
disabled persons,
(f) Other
4. Types of IE/SP work done with UNDP
5. Any other collaboration with UNDP (e.g., non-employment related but other types of
collaborations, shared projects, etc.)
48
B. UNDP IE AND SP PROJECT INPUTS
1. Origins of overall approach to IE and SP in Uzbekistan/organization
(a) External factors prompting need for IE/SP activities
(b) Internal/organizational factors prompting creation of IE/SP activities
2. Planning for IE/SP activities in the organization
3. Implementation of IE/SP activities in the organization
4. IE and SP project target group(s)
5. Planned vs target groups. reached
6. Use of tools, guidelines, or instruments related to IE/SP
(a) Provided by UNDP Tashkent
(b) Provided by UNDP (HQ)
(c) Provided from some other source
7. Project budgets (i.e., amounts allocated and spent on activities, perceptions of adequacy
of budgets in relation to costs, remaining budgetary needs, etc.)
8. Partners and roles of partners implementing IESP project activities
9. Forms of partnership/cooperation among partners implementing IESP project activities
a) Has capacity of CSOs and state bodies in joint provision of vocational training,
employment and social services improved?
10. Types of activities implemented by the organization
a) Are ICT tools developed by the project in the field of employment effectively used at
the policy and grass root levels in addressing employment issues of population, M&E
of State Centers on Employment and Social Protection of Population?
C. IESP PROJECT RESULTS
1. IE/SP organizational project outputs (e.g., number of trainings/workshops conducted,
number of participants attending the activities, number of disabled employed, etc)
2. IE/SP organizational project outcomes (e.g., networks established, laws or policies
changed or modified in favor of IE and SP, etc)
a) Has awareness of policy makers, civil society institutions on labour rights and labour
protection, gender aspects of employment, providing employment opportunities for
vulnerable people through social enterprises, social service provision via NGOs and
social partnership increased?
3. Monitoring and tracking of project activities (i.e., modes of tracking, information
collected, uses to which information is put for continuous improvement, etc)
4. Documentation of project outcomes
a) Has employment policy making, data-collection, analysis and M&E become more
participatory, gender-sensitive and of improved quality?
5. Project activities in relation to local, regional and national employment plans and
strategies
a) Has awareness of policy makers on gender issues in employment been raised? Has
readiness to use gender tools in employment policy making, M&E increased?
b) Have the mechanisms introduces by the project to enable the participation of civil
society in discussion and formulation of state policy on employment, social
protection and disability been functioning? What has changed?
c) Have recommendations and methodology for sheltered employment (social
enterprises) and their scale up been developed and accepted by the government?
49
6. Differences between UNDP IE/SP strategy and those being employed in
[place/organization]
D. IE AND SP DEFINITIONS AND PRINCIPLES
1. Definitions of IE and SP and alignment among different definitions
2. Operationalization of human rights principles (how UNDP defines human rights in an IE
context)
3. Attention to/emphasis given to human rights in UNDP IE work
E.PERCEPTIONS OF UNDP’s IESP PROJECT WEAKNESSES-CHALLENGES AND
STRENGTHS-SUCCESS
1. IESP project weaknesses and/or challenges
2. Modes of addressing IESP project weaknesses and/or challenges
3. IESP project strengths and/or successes
4. Modes of institutionalizing or sustaining IESP project strengths and/or successes
5. Lessons learned by stakeholders
6. Perceived impacts of IESP by stakeholders
7. Documentation of perceived impacts
8. Sustainability of IESP activities
a) Have the models of social enterprises piloted by the project been functioning
sustainable and in accordance with internationally recognized criteria of a social
enterprise?
F.VIEWS OF UNDP VALUE-ADDED TO INCREASING INCLUSIVE EMPLOYMENT
THROUGH SOCIAL PARTNERSHIP
1. UNDP’s role in identifying key challenges related to IE and SP
2. Strengths of UNDP’s IE/SP approaches
3. Weaknesses of UNDP’s IE/SP approaches
4. Overall assessments of UNDP’S IE/SP activities
5. Views of UNDP’s distinct or unique contribution (value-added) to increasing IE and SP in
your community, region and in the country as a whole
6. Additional IE/SP issues which respondents feel/documents suggest UNDP should be
addressing
7. IE/SP issues which respondents feel/documents suggest UNDP should no longer address
8. Recommendations for improving/strengthening UNDP’s IE and SP work (including, but not
limited to, additional partners or stakeholders UNDP could/should engage as strategic
partners in their work for IE and SP)
G. OTHER DATA/INFORMATION COLLECTED
H. POST-INTERVIEW NOTES
1. Individual impressions of respondent orientations towards UNDP
2. Individual impressions of respondent orientations toward UNDP’s IE and SP work
3. Additional impressions, comments, observations, ideas or thoughts
50
9.2
Work Plan/Mission Agenda
Activity
Desk Review – Prior to departure for
Tashkent:
 Conduct teleconference with UNDP
CO staff
 Obtain relevant documents
 Review documents
Mission to Tashkent
 Meet with UNDP CO Team
 Interviews with stakeholders
 Preliminary Findings
Validation – Provide UNDP CO with
preliminary finding and opportunity for
initial feedback
Drafting Report and Proposal – Based on
initial feedback from UNDP CO, draft
evaluation report and proposal for future
work
Feedback from UNDP and Parliament –
Comments and revisions are aggregated
and returned to the consultant for review
Finalization of Report and Proposal –
Once comments are received on draft
report and proposal, final versions of both
documents will be developed
Timeframe
6 days
December 05-14
4 days
December 15-20
1 day
December 20
9 days
December 21-04
11 days
January 04-15
5 days
January 15-20
51
Agenda for the Mission to Tashkent
December
15
December
16
Arrival to Tashkent
09:30
10:00
11:00
12:00
14:00
16:00
17.00
December
17
09:00
13:00
December
18
09:00
12.00
December
19
19.00
09:00
11:00
13:00
15:00
16:00
December
20
13:00
15:30
08:15
Stefan Priesner, Resident Representative, UNDP
Aziza Umarova, Head of Good Governance Unit, UNDP
IESP Staff
G. Makhmudova, Director BWA
IESP Staff
B.Sharapov, Head of the Monitoring and Analysis of Social
Protection Activities Department, MLSP
and other colleagues from MLSP
S. Fattakhova, Senior Research Coordinator, CER
K. Mykhamedkhanova, Research Coordinator, CER
L. Norov and other colleagues from CER
S. Akbarov, Head of Economic Governance Unit, UNDP
K. Inomkhodsjaev, Specialist, Economic Governance Unit,
UNDP
Z. Jumajev, Programme Coordinator, Economic Governance
Unit, UNDP
and other colleagues from Economic Governance Unit, UNDP
Driving to Samarkand
B.Oripova, Chair, NCO “Rahmdillik”
I. Dsjurajev, Director, SE “TepMenShoes”
H. Haitova, Chair, Association of Disabled, Pastdargomskij
Region
U. Amirov, Deputy Hokim, Pastdargomskij Region
and other colleagues, activists and beneficiaries.
Driving to Kharchi
A. Haidorov, Chair, NCO “MekhrSjafkat v asalomotlikfondi”
Safar Hydoiberdijev, Diretor, Regional Employment Center
and other colleagues, activists and beneficiaries.
Flying to Samarkand
B.Mukhammadalijev, Deputy Chair, FTUU
Pilar Gonzales, Social Policy Officer, UNICEF
HayulloMalikov, Social Policy Officer, UNICEF
Merelin Hoar, Education Officer, UNICEF
and other UNICEF staff.
Aziza Umarova, Head of Good Governance Unit, UNDP
A.Turajev, Director, PFP
and other PFP staff.
AlisherShaykhov, Chair, CoC
and other CoC staff
Validation workshop
Stefan Priesner, Resident Representative, UNDP
Aziza Umarova, Head of Good Governance Unit, UNDP
Depart Tashkent
52
9.3 Literature, project materials and other sources used
In English
«An Overdview of Uzbekistan's National Social Protection System», Stephen Kidd, November
2013
Executive Board of the United Nations Development Programme, «The evaluation policy of
UNDP», 15 November 2010
Government of Uzbekistan, The State Programme on Enhancing Social Support and Integration
of Persons with Disabilities for 2011-2015, draft
«Implementation of UN Convention on Rights of PWD: international and national experience»
June 23, 2010, conference materials (in English and Russian)
Memorandum of Understanding between the United Nations Development Programme,
Khokimiyat of Muynak District of the Republic of Karakalpakstan, Women Committee of
Muynak District, Karakalpak Republican centre to Support Women and their Families
''KeuilNuri'' and Liability Limited Company ''QaraqalpaqSheberiManzura'' of Muynak District
Minutes of the Project Board meetings
Project annual and quarterly progress reports.
Separate Memoranda of Understanding between UNDP and the following organizations: Central
Board of the Association of the Blind of Uzbekistan; the Ministry of Culture and Sports
Development of Uzbekistan; UNICEF, UNESCO, World Vision; GTZ
UNDP, Guidelines for Outcome Evaluators, 2002
UNDP, Handbook on Planning, Monitoring and Evaluating for Development Results, 2009
UNDP Project ACCESS: Evaluation Report, Arkadi Toritsyn, December 2010
UNDP, Strategic Plan, 2008-2011, Accelerating global progress on human development, 2008
www.undp.org/execbrd/word/dp07-43Rev1.doc
UNDP Uzbekistan, Country Program Action Plan (CPAP) 2010-2015,
www.undp.uz/en/publications/publication.php?id=237
UNDP Uzbekistan Inclusive Employment and Social Partnership,
www.undp.uz/en/projects/project.php?id=171
UNDP Uzbekistan «Introduction of ICT in the area of employment and social protection of
population»
53
UNDP Uzbekistan Policy Brief «Promoting the Employment of Persons with Disabilities in
Uzbekistan: Challenges and Prospects», August 2012
UNDP Uzbekistan, United Nations Development Assistance Framework for 2010-2015,
http://www.undg.org/docs/10675/Uzbekistan-UNDAF-2010-2015---English.pdf
UN, International Convention on the Rights of Persons with Disabilities
UN, Standard Rules on the Equalization of Opportunities for Persons with Disabilities, 1994
InRussian
Аналитическая справка по результатам изучения законодательства зарубежных стран в
сфере оказания (предоставления) социальных услуг
Аналитический отчет по результатам исследования институциональных условий для
развития социальных предприятий в Узбекистане, Ташкент 2012
Бизнес-план производства молочных продуктов ООО «MARJON-TOG»
Закон Республики Узбекистан «О внесении изменений и дополнений в закон Республики
Узбекистан «О социальной защищенности инвалидов в Республике Узбекистан»
Закон Республики Узбекистан «О внесении изменений и дополнений в закон Республики
Узбекистан «О занятости населения»
Информация о проведении практического семинара тренинга «Социальное партнерство
ННО и органов государственной власти в сфере реализации социально-экономических
программ и развитии социальных услуг», 17-20 апреля 2012 г. в г.Ташкент
Отчет дизайнера по домашнему текстилю
Отчет национального консультанта - аудитора по налогообложению и бухгалтерскому
учету проекта «Социальное партнерство в обеспечении занятости»
Отчет о результатах произведенной оценки потребностей социальных предприятий по
правовым вопросам
Отчет тренера по дизайну национального рукоделия
План мероприятий по реализации Государственной программы по обеспечению
социальной защиты и интеграции инвалидов на 2011-2015 годы
Пояснительная записка к проекту Закона «О социальном партнерстве»
Проект ПРООН «Социальное партнерство в обеспечении занятости»,
Проект Закона Республики Узбекистан «О социальном партнерстве»
Протокол круглого стола социальных предприятий Узбекистана
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Рекомендации к Международной научно-практической конференции «Роль институтов
гражданского общества в охране и реализации трудовых прав граждан»
Руководство по созданию и обеспечению устойчивого и эффективного развития
социальных предприятий в Узбекистане
Федерации Профсоюзов Узбекистана – Анализ опросов «Профсоюзы Узбекистана в
условиях рыночных отноений», 2010
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