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Leverage the Rights Management
Connector for your premises
Overview Technical Article
Microsoft France
Published: December 2013 (Updated: October 2014)
Version: 1.0d
Author: Philippe Beraud, Arnaud Jumelet (Microsoft France)
Contributors: Enrique Saggese (Microsoft Corporation)
For the latest information on RMS, please see
www.microsoft.com/rms
Copyright © 2014 Microsoft Corporation. All rights reserved.
Abstract: This document provides information about the Microsoft Rights Management connector and how
it can be used to provide information protection within existing on-premises deployments that use Exchange
Server, Office SharePoint Server or operating systems such as Windows Server 2008 R2 or Windows Server
2012.
By following the steps outlined in this document you should be able to successfully prepare your
environment to deploy the Azure Rights Management service (Azure RMS), install and configure the Rights
Management connector, and start using it within your organization to create and consume protected
content.
Table of Contents
FEEDBACK ........................................................................................................................................................... 3
INTRODUCTION ................................................................................................................................................. 4
OBJECTIVES OF THIS PAPER ..................................................................................................................................................... 5
NON-OBJECTIVES OF THIS PAPER ........................................................................................................................................... 5
ORGANIZATION OF THIS PAPER .............................................................................................................................................. 6
ABOUT THE AUDIENCE ............................................................................................................................................................. 6
AZURE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT SERVICE AT A GLANCE ............................................................................. 7
PROTECTING CONTENT............................................................................................................................................................ 7
WHAT CAN MICROSOFT SEE................................................................................................................................................... 9
USING RMS-ENLIGHTENED APPLICATIONS ........................................................................................................................ 10
OVERVIEW OF THE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT CONNECTOR ....................................................................... 11
DEPLOYING THE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT CONNECTOR ........................................................................... 13
MAKING HIGH LEVEL PLAN ................................................................................................................................................... 13
CONFIGURE THE AZURE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT SERVICE ................................................................................................. 13
INSTALLING THE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT CONNECTOR ...................................................................................................... 18
CONFIGURING THE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT CONNECTOR ................................................................................................. 23
AUTHORIZING SERVERS TO USE THE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT CONNECTOR ..................................................................... 25
CONFIGURING SERVERS TO USE THE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT CONNECTOR..................................................................... 26
TESTING AND EVALUATING THE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT CONNECTOR INSTALLATION .................. 33
BUILDING THE ON-PREMISES TEST LAB ENVIRONMENT ..................................................................................................... 33
CREATING AN AZURE ACTIVE DIRECTORY/OFFICE 365 TENANT AND ACTIVATING THE AZURE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT
SERVICE.................................................................................................................................................................................... 44
SETTING UP THE DIRECTORY SYNCHRONIZATION AND THE FEDERATION WITH THE TENANT ........................................ 44
INSTALLING AND CONFIGURING THE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT CONNECTOR .................................................................... 68
CONFIGURING EXCHANGE SERVER 2013 TO USE THE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT CONNECTOR ....................................... 78
CONFIGURING SHAREPOINT SERVER 2013 TO USE THE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT CONNECTOR ................................... 99
TESTING IRM CAPABILITIES WITH THE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT CONNECTOR .............................................................. 108
ADMINISTERING THE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT CONNECTOR ................................................................ 119
MONITORING THE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT CONNECTOR ............................................................................................... 119
ENABLING TRACING THE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT CONNECTOR ..................................................................................... 121
GETTING USAGE LOGS FROM THE AZURE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT SERVICE.................................................................. 121
2 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Feedback
For any feedback or comment regarding this document, please send a mail to [email protected]
3 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Introduction
Every day, information workers use e-mail messages and collaboration solutions to exchange sensitive
information such as financial reports and data, legal contracts, confidential product information, sales
reports and projections, competitive analysis, research and patent information, customer records, employee
information, etc.
Because people can now access their e-mail from just about anywhere, mailboxes have transformed into
repositories containing large amounts of potentially sensitive information. Likewise, collaboration solutions
enable people to share information within the enterprise but also across organizations. As a result,
information leakage can be a serious threat to organizations. Leaks of confidential information can result in
lost revenue, compromised ability to compete, unfairness in purchasing and hiring decisions, diminished
customer confidence, and more. This risk demands effective Information Protection and Control (IPC)
systems, which are not only secure but are also easy to apply, whether it’s to e-mail messages sent or
documents accessed inside an organization or outside the organization to business partner organizations.
Note
IPC is also known as a different set of names including: data leakage prevention, data loss protection,
content filtering, enterprise rights management, etc. All of these categories aim to prevent an accidental and
unauthorized distribution of sensitive information.
One should note that IPC has been available for more than a decade but only few organizations are using
this kind of solution. This can be explained by previous lack of interest of Business Decision Makers or by
the complexity generally observed when deploying such a far-reaching solution. Also user’s expectation is
high and they are not tolerating any downtime. Users would not be satisfied if the protected document they
are trying to read couldn’t be open because an Information Protection element is not responding or if it
isn’t supported on their devices. Deploying on-premises IPC can be challenging and/or require significant
knowledge to be done right. This was notably the case for Microsoft Active Directory Right Management
Services (AD RMS)1, an information protection technology that enables AD RMS-enlightened applications
such as Microsoft Office to protect digital content from unauthorized use, both online and offline, inside
and outside of the organization’s boundaries.
Unlike AD RMS, the Azure Rights Management service (formerly known as Windows Azure Active Directory
Rights Management or AADRM) provides a Software as a Service (SaaS) information protection solution for
everyone. As a highly scalable and available cloud-based IPC solution run by Microsoft in data centers
strategically located around the world, the Azure Rights Management service enables organizations of any
size to minimize the effort required to implement an effective IPC to sustain the collaboration inside and
outside of the organization’s boundaries.
With the Azure Rights Management service, the implementation process is fast and straightforward. Thanks
to the Rights Management connector, providing information protection capabilities to existing on-premises
servers onto the corporate network such as those running Exchange Server, SharePoint Server or Windows
Server 2008 R2 or Windows Server 2012 operating systems (File Classification Infrastructure) is now just few
clicks away.
1
Microsoft Active Directory Right Management Services (AD RMS): http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=84726
4 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Objectives of this paper
This document provides information about the Rights Management connector and how it can be used to
provide information protection within existing on-premises deployments that use Exchange Server,
SharePoint Server or operating systems such as Windows Server 2008 R2 or Windows Server 2012.
Furthermore, by following the steps outlined in this document you should be able to successfully prepare
your environment to deploy the Azure Rights Management service, install and configure the connector, and
start using it within your organization to create and consume protected content.
Non-objectives of this paper
This document doesn’t offer a full description of the Microsoft Rights Management services offerings. It
rather simply focusses on key aspects in the context of this paper that aims at providing the readers an
understanding on how to leverage and deploy the Rights Management connector on their on-premises
corporate organization to benefit from the Azure Rights Management service with Exchange Server and
SharePoint Server existing deployments.
Note
For an overview of the NEW Microsoft Rights Management service offerings, see the whitepaper
MICROSOFT RIGHTS MANAGEMENT SERVICES2, the online documentation3 as well as the posts on the RMS Team blog4.
This document doesn’t cover the configuration of Exchange Online and SharePoint Online with the Azure
Rights Management service.
Note
For information on how to protect information in Office 365 subscriptions, please refer to the
whitepaper INFORMATION PROTECTION AND CONTROL (IPC) IN OFFICE 365 WITH AZURE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT5.
The Rights Management connector recently adds the support of the File Classification Infrastructure (FCI)
available in Windows Server 2008 R2 and above versions.
MICROSOFT RIGHTS MANAGEMENT SERVICES: http://blogs.technet.com/b/rms/archive/2013/07/31/the-new-microsoft-rightsmanagement-services-whitepaper.aspx
2
3
Microsoft Rights Management services: http://www.microsoft.com/rms
4
RMS Team blog: http://blogs.technet.com/b/rms
INFORMATION PROTECTION AND CONTROL (IPC) IN OFFICE 365 WITH AZURE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT: http://www.microsoft.com/enus/download/details.aspx?id=40333
5
5 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Note
FCI is controlled and exposed through the File Server Resource Manager (FSRM). FSRM is a feature of
the File Services role in Windows Server 2008 R2 and above. It can be installed as part of the File Services role, using
Server Manager. For more information on the FCI technology, see the white paper FILE CLASSIFICATION INFRASTRUCTURE6,
videos on Channel 97 and of course the Storage Team Blog’s8 post’s on FCI.
FCI is a capacity that enables the server to scan local files and assess their content to determine if they
contain sensitive data, and if they do classify them accordingly by tagging them with classification properties
you define. Once files are classified, FCI can also automatically take action on these files, such as applying
adequate rights management protection to the files to prevent them from leaking beyond their intended
audience.
This document doesn’t cover the configuration of FCI with the Rights Management connector.
Note
For information and instructions on how to leverage this additional workload with the Rights
Management connector, see the Microsoft TechNet article CONFIGURING A FILE SERVER FOR FILE CLASSIFICATION
INFRASTRUCTURE TO USE THE CONNECTOR9.
Organization of this paper
To cover the aforementioned objectives, this document is organized by themes, which are covered in the
following sections:

AZURE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT SERVICE AT A GLANCE.

OVERVIEW OF THE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT CONNECTOR.

DEPLOYING THE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT CONNECTOR.

TESTING AND EVALUATING THE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT CONNECTOR INSTALLATION.

ADMINISTERING THE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT CONNECTOR.
About the audience
This document is intended for IT professionals and system architects who are interested in understanding
the various options for protecting and controlling on-premises information assets in their environment
based on the Azure Rights Management service’s foundation and how to leverage in this context the Rights
Management connector related capabilities.
WINDOWS SERVER 2008 R2 FILE CLASSIFICATION INFRASTRUCTURE TECHNICAL WHITE PAPER:
http://download.microsoft.com/download/D/D/3/DD3FB42C-D3C7-47C0-9431-40D80256FB0A/FCI_TDM_WP_May_09.pdf
6
7
FCI videos on Channel 9: http://channel9.msdn.com/tags/FCI/
The Storage Team at Microsoft – File Cabinet Blog :
http://blogs.technet.com/filecab/archive/tags/File+Classification+Infrastructure+_2800_FCI_2900_/default.aspx
8
CONFIGURING A FILE SERVER FOR FILE CLASSIFICATION INFRASTRUCTURE TO USE THE CONNECTOR: http://technet.microsoft.com/enus/library/dn375964#BKMK_FileServer
9
6 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Azure Rights Management service at a glance
The Azure Rights Management service is a service designed to provide Information Protection and Control
(IPC) capabilities that work with your devices, services and applications. As such, secure collaboration is
enhanced and extended to organizations and individuals using computers and mobile devices.
Unlike Active Directory Rights Management Server (AD RMS) which is based on on-premises infrastructure,
the solution is available as a Software as a Service (SaaS) solution in the Cloud. Hosted in Windows Azure,
it’s offered in the same regions as Office 365.
Note
As it is a cloud-hosted service, deploying Azure Rights Management does not require an on-premises
deployment to provide the core functionality for Information Protection, though certain pre-requisites and
integration services (e.g. the DirSync tool for Azure Active Directory integration and the Rights Management services
connector for integration with on-premises servers) are required to obtain the maximum benefit out of the service.
The Azure Rights Management service provides continuous data protection during all the lifecycle of the
information; the protection is persistent when the data is stored or shared between people and applications.
It is important to note that the Azure Rights Management service offering is location and device independent
so once a document or email is protected it stays protected as it travels between clients, devices, servers
and online services, even if the document travels outside of the organization’s boundaries.
The Azure Rights Management service is focused at this time on organizations that don’t have existing IPC
capabilities in place. In other words, in the context of this paper, the Azure Rights Management service is
aimed at those that don’t have on-premises Active Directory Rights Management infrastructure. It must be
noted that, unlike AD RMS, Azure Rights Management service can be subscribed and activated in a couple
of minutes.
The Azure Rights Management service is used to achieve the following key scenarios:

Limit e-mail and file access to only a specific list of individual users or groups identified by their email addresses.

Limit the use of e-mail and/or files to only a limited set of rights such as the right to view the
document while blocking other actions such as copying or printing.
The Azure Rights Management service is responsible for secure electronic key exchange operations between
the involved client devices, servers and/or other systems. In such a context, the Azure Rights Management
service also requires authentication and authorization information and thus leverages Azure Active Directory
and associated services, and notably Directory Synchronization and Federation. These enable authentication
using Azure Active Directory with credentials matching those in the on-premises directory or through
federation with an on-premises identity infrastructure – such as Active Directory with Active Directory
Federation Services (AD FS). Support for additional identity sources, including Microsoft account, is planned
for the future.
Protecting content
The Azure Rights Management service provides two ways to protect content: templates-based and userdefined rights.
7 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Default rights policy templates
The Azure Rights Management service supports the application of policies to documents based on predefined rights policy templates which define restrictions such as user rights, expiration and offline access for
the content they protect. Templates are predefined policies that enable users to easily apply permissions to
IRM-protected content. Microsoft RMS provides default rights policy templates which represent commonly
used policies.
The following default templates help restricting access to users within a company are provided:

Company - Confidential. This template, when applied to content, helps to prevent recipients (or
users of the content) to copy and print the content, whereas all other usage type is allowed.

Company - Confidential View Only. This template, when applied to content, only enables
recipients (or users of the content) to read or view the content but do not allow content
modification in any way from its original published form.
Important note
When either of these Azure Rights Management service templates is applied to content, only
users within the organization are able to open the content.
Important note
The name of the default templates reflects the name of the company specified when signingup to an Azure Active Directory/Office 365 Enterprise subscription. “Company” is indeed replaced by the company
name. If a tenant is named “DemoRMS” the two templates above are consequently named “DemoRMS Confidential” and “DemoRMS – Confidential View Only”.
Custom rights policy templates
The Azure Rights Management service provides the ability to create custom rights policy templates that let
you define the protection policies you would like to roll out within your organization.
8 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Note
For information and instructions on how to configure custom rights policy templates, see the blog post
CREATE CUSTOM TEMPLATES IN AZURE RMS WITH THE AZURE MANAGEMENT PORTAL10 and the Microsoft TechNet article Foo11.
User defined rights
When users need to restrict content for specific audiences or need to apply specific rights which don’t match
the existing rights policy templates, end-users can also apply permission manually by defining their own
rights. Users can enter users or groups that will get defined on the policy as well as define specific usage
rights on content.
There’s one special case for this scenario which is the protection of email through the Do Not Forward option
available in mail clients. When the Do Not Forward option is applied, the content is protected with a custom
policy that grants limited usage rights to the intended recipients of the email automatically so only those
users can open it, and certain rights are restricted such as that of copying or forwarding the content,
effectively limiting the audience of the email to its original recipients.
What can Microsoft see
Similarly to on-premises AD RMS infrastructure, the Azure Rights Management service works with the policy
that was attached to a document (the Publishing License), where it looks up rights information and
constructs a use license for the authorized recipient/user.
Note
For additional information on licenses, see the blog post LICENSES AND CERTIFICATES, AND HOW AD RMS
PROTECTS AND CONSUMES DOCUMENTS12.
The Azure Rights Management service never sees the data that you protect or consume. This is an
important point. You manage your data in accordance and compliance with your security and IT
policies. In the primary use case for the Rights Management connector, you run Exchange Server or
SharePoint Server on your premises, and your documents flow between those servers and the client
applications, so no part of Microsoft’s online services (including but not limited to the Azure Rights
Management service) ever has access to your data unless you explicitly send or upload the documents
or email to a Microsoft-hosted service.
You use the Azure Rights Management service to control access to your content by issuing contentaccess licenses to authorized parties, both internal and external to your organization, but this user
access is also dependent on the users having physical access to the documents themselves. Even if
Microsoft Rights Management issues licenses for a user to access a specific document, that user won’t
be able to consume the document unless the user also has a copy of the document itself.
CREATE CUSTOM TEMPLATES IN AZURE RMS WITH THE AZURE MANAGEMENT PORTAL:
http://blogs.technet.com/b/rms/archive/2014/04/03/create-custom-templates-in-azure-rms-with-the-azure-management-portal.aspx
10
11
Foo: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn642472.aspx#BKMK_HowToConfigureCustomTemplates
LICENSES AND CERTIFICATES, AND HOW AD RMS PROTECTS AND CONSUMES DOCUMENTS:
http://blogs.technet.com/b/information_protection/archive/2011/03/13/licenses-and-certificates-and-how-ad-rms-protects-andconsumes-documents.aspx
12
9 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
The Azure Rights Management service handles the following assets for your organization:

Your tenant root keys (optionally protected by a Hardware Security Module, which marks the key
non-exportable and non-recoverable)

User-specific keys and certificates

Centralized policies

Configuration of your tenant

Access logs for your tenant
Microsoft uses these assets solely for the purpose of providing you the Azure Rights Management service.
Microsoft is deeply committed to our customers’ privacy and security.
Note
For additional information on this topic, see the MICROSOFT RIGHTS MANAGEMENT PRIVACY STATEMENT13 and
WINDOWS AZURE PRIVACY STATEMENT14.
Using RMS-enlightened applications
The Azure Rights Management service is built to work in conjunction with RMS-enlightened applications,
i.e. applications that are enhanced to consume and/or publish RMS protected files such as Microsoft Office,
Microsoft Office 365, Foxit Enterprise Reader15, SECUDE End-to-End Information Security for SAP16, etc.
Such applications offer data protection and rights enforcement capabilities by leveraging the RMS clients
and Software Development Kits (SDKs) that are available on most important platforms: Windows and Mac
OS/X computers, Windows RT and Windows Phone devices, iOS, and Android devices. Applications in other
environments can interact with Microsoft RMS by utilizing the service’s RESTful APIs directly.
13
MICROSOFT RIGHTS MANAGEMENT PRIVACY STATEMENT: https://portal.aadrm.com/Legal/Privacy
14
WINDOWS AZURE PRIVACY STATEMENT: http://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/support/legal/privacy-statement/
15
Foxit Enterprise Reader with the RMS Plug-in Module: http://www.foxitsoftware.com/landingpage/2012/07/Reader-Ads-RMS/
SECUDE End-to-End Information Security for SAP: http://www.secude.com/company/partners/end-to-end-information-securityfor-sap/
16
10 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Overview of the Rights Management
connector
Many pre-existing on-premises solutions that provide Information Rights Management (IRM) functionality
such as Microsoft Exchange and Microsoft SharePoint leveraged for that purpose RMS SDKs and clients that
were not aware of the Microsoft RMS cloud-based implementation.
Since the ability to interact with the cloud-hosted Azure Rights Management service has only been
introduced in later versions of the RMS SDK, these existing on-premises environments consequently don’t
natively support direct communication with the Azure Rights Management service, which resides outside
the organization’s boundaries.
Note
Microsoft Office 2013 utilizes the RMS SDK 2.0 and fully supports interacting with the Azure Rights
Management service without the need for additional software.
To help address this situation, the Rights Management connector can be used to quickly enable existing onpremises servers such as Microsoft Exchange or Microsoft SharePoint to use their IRM functionality with the
cloud-hosted Azure Rights Management service.
For that purpose, the Rights Management connector is implemented as a small-footprint service that is
installed on-premises on a Windows Server 2008 R2 or Windows Server 2012 server. Once installed and
configured – as covered later in this document – the Rights Management connector will act as a
communications interface between the on-premises IRM-enabled servers and the cloud service. In other
words, the Rights Management connector will act as a pass-through to the Azure Rights Management
service for IRM calls. The Rights Management connector is like a cloud proxy/relay, and will behave as an
on-premises AD RMS server and relay any related call to the Azure Rights Management service.
Azure Active Directory/
Office 365 tenant
Active Directory Federation
Services (AD FS)
Active Directory
Azure Active Directory
Directory Synchronization Tool
Exchange Server
Rights Management
connector
Activated by tenant
administrator
Azure Rights Management service
SharePoint Server
File Server
When on-premises IRM-enabled servers call one of the exposed Web services - as it will with a classic AD
RMS server -, the Rights Management connector checks the identity of the caller, verifies that it is authorized
11 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
to use the connector and performs an identical call against the Azure Rights Management service, and after
obtaining the results returns the results to the calling server.
When verifying that the caller is authorized, the Rights Management connector checks that the identity of
the caller is present in the local list of authorized identities (specified as either an AD user account, service
account, computer account or AD group). This list also contains accounts (called Service Principals) that are
specifically created as each authorized entity is added in the Administration tool and that will be used to
perform all operations in Azure Rights Management on behalf of the servers that are authorized.
At the time of this writing, you can configure the following supported products and technologies to use the
connector:
1.
Exchange Server 2010 and Exchange Server 2013
2.
SharePoint Server 2010 and SharePoint Server 2013
The next few sections outline a plan for designing, deploying and testing your Azure Rights Management
service infrastructure with the Rights Management connector.
Note
17
For additional information, see the Microsoft TechNet article RIGHTS MANAGEMENT CONNECTOR17.
RIGHTS MANAGEMENT CONNECTOR: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink?LinkID=285475
12 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Deploying the Rights Management connector
Making High level plan
In order to get the best of the Azure Rights Management service offerings, you need to plan its deployment
carefully. Even though the Azure Rights Management service is much easier to deploy and use than previous
solutions for Information Protection, you still need to meet certain pre-requisites and follow certain steps in
order. In particular, you need to plan to:

Configure the Azure Rights Management service. To install the Rights Management connector, it is
necessary to first set up and configure your Azure Rights Management service.

Create your tenant. While your users could individually sign-up for the Azure Rights
Management service, in order to benefit from Enterprise features such as integration with
Office 365 and on-premises servers, logging, key management and super user access and
to simplify the end users sign-up and login experiences, you need to provision a Microsoft
Rights Management’s tenant for your organization.

Configure your tenant. This includes setting up Directory Synchronization and/or Federation
to make your users experience seamless.
Note
For additional information, please refer to the Microsoft online documentation and/or the whitepaper
ACTIVE DIRECTORY FROM ON-PREMISES TO THE CLOUD18.

Obtain and install prerequisite software.

Download and install the Rights Management connector software.

Configure the Rights Management connector.

Authorize servers to use the Rights Management connector.

Configure servers to use IRM through the Rights Management connector.

Test IRM features.
The following sections guide you through these steps.
Configure the Azure Rights Management service
Creating your tenant
This is done by using one of the following options.
18
ACTIVE DIRECTORY FROM ON-PREMISES TO THE CLOUD: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=36391
13 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
1.
Signing up to a Microsoft Office 365 Enterprise tenant and enabling the Azure Rights
Management service.
2.
Signing up to the Microsoft Rights Management stand-alone service.
-or-
Option 1 - Signing up to a Microsoft Office 365 Enterprise tenant and enabling
the Azure Rights Management service
To sign up to a Microsoft Office 365 Enterprise tenant,
http://www.microsoft.com/office/preview/en/office-365-enterprise.
Note
follow
the
instructions
at
For more information, see the article SIGN IN TO OFFICE 36519.
Once you have signed up20 and established your organization with an account in Office 365 Enterprise,
enabling the Azure Rights Management service capabilities within the Office 365 Enterprise just takes a few
additional steps to enable and configure for use.
By default, the Azure Rights Management service is disabled when you sign up for your Office 365 account
in Microsoft Office 365 Enterprise.
19
SIGN IN TO OFFICE 365: http://onlinehelp.microsoft.com/en-us/office365-enterprises/ff637600.aspx
20
Office 365 Enterprise E3: http://www.microsoft.com/office/preview/en/office-365-enterprise
14 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
To enable the Azure Rights Management service for use your Office 365 Enterprise tenant, you need to:

Use the Office 365 admin center. Proceed with the following steps:
a.
Navigate to the Office 365 admin center at https://portal.microsoftonline.com and login with
your administrative credentials.
b.
In the left pane of the Office 365 admin center, click Service Settings.
c.
From the Service Settings page, click Rights Management.
d.
Under Protect your information, click Manage.
e.
Under Rights Management, click Activate.
f.
When prompted Do you want to activate rights management?, click Activate.
-or
Use the Azure Rights Management service from Windows PowerShell
Note
Windows PowerShell is a task-based command-line shell and scripting language that is
designed for system/service administration and automation. It uses administrative tasks called cmdlets. Each cmdlet
has required and optional arguments, called parameters, that identify which objects to act on or control how the
cmdlet performs its task. You can combine cmdlets in scripts to perform complex functions that give you more
control and help you automate the administration of Windows, applications and online services in the Cloud. It has
become a common way to manage the latest generation of Microsoft products and services.
For more information about Windows PowerShell, please see the Windows PowerShell Web site21, the Windows
PowerShell online help22, and the Windows PowerShell Weblog23 Windows PowerShell Software Development Kit
(SDK)24 that includes a programmer’s guide along with a full reference.

Install the latest Azure Rights Management Administration Tool 25.
21
Windows PowerShell Web site: http://www.microsoft.com/powershell
22
Windows PowerShell online help: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb978526.aspx
23
Windows PowerShell Weblog: http://blogs.msdn.com/powershell
24
Windows PowerShell SDK: http://msdn2.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa830112.aspx
25
Azure AD Rights Management Administration Tool: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=30339
15 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises

From PowerShell run:
PS C:\Windows\System32> Import-Module aadrm
PS C:\Windows\System32> Connect-AadrmService
Provide Office365 Tenant Administrator or Microsoft RMS Tenant Global Administrator
credential
PS C:\Windows\System32> Enable-Aadrm
PS C:\Windows\System32> Disconnect-AadrmService
Note
The Microsoft Rights Management administration module for Windows PowerShell should only be
used as needed for administrators and users of other service portals. For more information on this advanced
alternative procedure, see the Microsoft TechNet article ENABLING THE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT SERVICE26.
Once activated, the Azure Rights Management service can be then administered via Windows PowerShell
and/or through the Microsoft Online Portal.
Option 2 - Signing up to the Azure Rights Management stand-alone service
To sign up to an Azure Rights Management stand-alone service, proceed with the following steps:
1.
26
For a trial version, click on
https://portal.microsoftonline.com/Signup/MainSignUp15.aspx?&OfferId=A43415D3-404C-4df3B31B-AAD28118A778&dl=RIGHTSMANAGEMENT
ENABLING THE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT SERVICE: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj585015.aspx
16 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
2.
To buy the service, click on
https://portal.microsoftonline.com/Signup/MainSignUp15.aspx?&OfferId=9DF77AF9-DAAE-4d518E0E-EEEADD4866B8&dl=RIGHTSMANAGEMENT
Important note
As illustrated in the above screen shots, if you already have an Azure Active Directory tenant
created for other purposes, you can add that account by selecting the sign in to add this subscription to your
current account option during the sign-up process.
Whichever option you choose, Azure Active Directory must be already provisioned and the Azure
Rights Management service must be already activated before proceeding with the installation and
the configuration of the Rights Management connector.
Configuring your tenant
Once the Azure Rights Management service is enabled, it is required that Azure Active Directory is set-up to
work with the users and groups in your Active Directory. While it is possible to use Office 365 with manually
created accounts in Azure Active Directory, the use of the Azure Rights Management service along with the
Rights Management connector requires that the accounts in Azure Active Directory are synchronized with
Active Directory.
Note
For instructions on how to configure your Azure Active Directory tenant, see Microsoft TechNet article
ADMINISTERING YOUR WINDOWS AZURE AD TENANT27.
27
ADMINISTERING YOUR WINDOWS AZURE AD TENANT: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh967611.aspx
17 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Note
For instructions on how to enable directory synchronization with Azure Active Directory using DirSync,
see Microsoft TechNet article DIRECTORY SYNCHRONIZATION ROADMAP28.
Optionally enabling federation between your Active Directory and Azure Active Directory.
You have the option of enabling identity federation between your on-premises directory and Azure Active
Directory, which enables a more seamless user experience through single sign-on to the Azure Rights
Management service.
Note
For instructions on setting up federation with AD FS between Active Directory and Azure Active
Directory, see Microsoft TechNet article CONFIGURE SINGLE SIGN-ON29.
Certain configurations, such as access to SharePoint 2013 protected libraries from Office 2013 clients,
require that federation is enabled.
Once you have completed the prerequisites, use the following procedure to complete installation of the
Rights Management connector in your environment.
Installing the Rights Management connector
You
can
download
the
Rights
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=314106.
Management
connector
software
from
A separate install for the 32-bit version of the Rights Management connector administration tool is available
in the same location.
Set up a computer to run the Rights Management connector. The computer must meet the following criteria:

64 bit physical or virtual computer running Windows Server 2008 R2 or Windows Server 2012.

At least 1GB of RAM.

A minimum of 64GB of disk space.

At least one network interface.

Access to the Internet via a firewall or proxy that doesn’t require authentication.
Furthermore, the computer must be in a forest or domain that trusts any other forest in the organization
where there are installations of Exchange or SharePoint servers that you need to integrate with the Azure
Rights Management service.
A minimum of two connector computers is required for fault tolerance and high availability. For additional
information, see Section § CONFIGURING THE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT CONNECTOR FOR HIGH AVAILABILITY.
28
DIRECTORY SYNCHRONIZATION ROADMAP: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh967642.aspx
29
CONFIGURE SINGLE SIGN-ON: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh967628.aspx
18 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Important note
A single connector installation (potentially consisting of multiple servers for high availability)
needs to be installed per organization (or more specifically, per Azure Rights Management service tenant). Unlike
AD RMS, there’s no need to make one installation per forest.
To install the Rights Management connector, proceed with the following steps:
1.
On
the
target
computer,
download
the
Rights
Management
connector
(RMSConnectorSetup_x64.exe) from the http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=314106.
2.
Right click the file RMSConnectorSetup_x64.exe and select Run as Administrator on the target
computer. The Rights Management connector setup wizard opens up.
You are now offered with the option to install either the Rights Management connector and the
Rights Management connector administration tool or the Rights Management connector
administration tool only.
Choose the first option to install the connector on the local computer.
Note
You can use the second option to install the administration tool on an administrator’s computer. The
minimum requirements for installing the administration tool alone are:
1. 32 or 64 bit physical or virtual computer running Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012, Windows 7
or Windows 8
2. At least 1GB of RAM
3. A minimum of 64GB of disk space
4. At least one network interface
5. Access to the Internet
6. It must be member of a forest or domain that is trusted by forests in the organization where there are
installations of Exchange or SharePoint servers that you need to integrate with Azure Rights Management.
3.
Click Next.
19 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
4.
On the End User License agreement page, click Next after reading the agreement and agreeing
to its terms by clicking on the corresponding option.
As soon as you begin to use the Rights Management connector, you need to enter credentials with
sufficient privileges to perform the installation.
An account with either of the following privileges will suffice:
a.
Office 365 Tenant Administrator. An account with administrator privileges on your Office
365 tenant. This applies to the Office 365 Rights Management service SKU add-on30.
b. Azure Rights Management service Tenant Global Administrator. For the Azure Rights
Management service, an account with administrator privileges on the Azure Rights
30
See option 1 in Section § Configure the Azure Rights Management service
Creating your tenant earlier in this document
20 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Management service tenant. This applies to Microsoft Rights Management stand-alone
service SKU31.
c.
Rights Management connector Administrator. An account in Azure AD that has been
granted rights to install and administer the Rights Management connector for the
organization. This applies to Microsoft Rights Management stand-alone service SKU32.
If the last option is chosen, in order to assign the Rights Management connector administrator role
to an account, you need to execute the following steps:
a.
Install the latest Microsoft Rights Management Administration Tools.
b. From a Windows PowerShell command prompt, run the following command:
PS C:\Windows\System32> Import-Module aadrm
PS C:\Windows\System32> Connect-AadrmService
c.
Provide Office365 Tenant Administrator or Azure Rights Management service Tenant
Global Administrator credential
d. And then one of the following commands:
PS C:\Windows\System32> Add-AadrmRoleBasedAdministrator -EmailAddress <email address> -Role "GlobalAdministrator"
-orPS C:\Windows\System32> Add-AadrmRoleBasedAdministrator -ObjectId <object id> -Role "ConnectorAdministrator"
-orPS C:\Windows\System32> Add-AadrmRoleBasedAdministrator -SecurityGroupDisplayName <group Name> -Role
"ConnectorAdministrator"
Enter valid credentials and then click Next.
31
See option 2 in Section § Configure the Azure Rights Management service
Creating your tenant earlier in this document
32
Ibid.
21 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
5.
You are now asked to confirm that you want to perform the installation on the local computer. Click
Install. A User Account Control dialog opens up.
6.
Click Yes to confirm the installation of the Rights Management connector. All pre-requisite software
is validated and installed, Internet Information Services (IIS) is installed if not present already and
the Rights Management connector software is installed and configured.
The wizard configures the IIS Web server and then registers the various Web services identical to
those exposed by an on-premises AD RMS server (e.g. certification.asmx, license.asmx). All the
required pages are created under the path “_wmcs“ in the Default Web site.
Also, during this step, the necessary configurations are performed in the online Azure Rights
Management service. The Azure Rights Management service is queried for pre-existing service
authorization configuration and the configuration is downloaded from the tenant. For that purpose:

If configuration information is not already existing, the wizard will create on the tenant an
empty table of servers authorized to utilize the Rights Management connector to
communicate with the tenant.

If the table of authorized servers is already present, the connector configuration is instead
automatically downloaded from the corresponding Azure Rights Management service
tenant. This corresponds to the situation where a Rights Management connector node has
already been previously installed for this tenant.
After authenticating the provided Azure Rights Management service tenant administrator, a set of
authorization certificates are created and downloaded from the Azure Rights Management service,
and installed in the local computer, protected via DPAPI under the Local System account.
22 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
An authorization symmetric key (ServicePrincipalKey) is also downloaded from the Azure Rights
Management service for service-to-service (S2S) authentication and configured in the Rights
Management connector. The authorization symmetric key is stored locally in the Registry and also
protected with DPAPI under the Local System account.
Note
All the configuration settings
HKLM\Software\Microsoft\AADRM\Connector.
are
on
the
registry
at
the
following
location:
After setup is finished, a confirmation screen opens.
Note
During the setup, a log file is generated and stored under %USERPROFILE%\AppData\Local\Temp.
You are presented with the option to configure the connection. Clicking Finish with that option
enabled will launch the Rights Management connector administration tool. The tool will create the
necessary accounts in the Azure AD/Office 365 tenant and grant them the necessary rights
(depending of the type of the server). Further explanation and details are given in the next section.
Click Finish.
Configuring the Rights Management connector
Configuring the Rights Management connector for high availability
In order for your servers to be able to connect to the Azure Rights Management service reliably, you should
deploy at least two connector servers and load balance them.
Installation of a second connector node is exactly as that the first node. Once installed you need to define a
connector URL server name and configure a load balancing system.
The connector service URL server name can be any name under a namespace that you control. For example,
you could create an entry in your DNS system for connector.yourdomain.com and point it to an IP address
in your load balancing system. There are no special requirements for this name and it doesn’t need to be
configured on the connector servers themselves. This name doesn’t need to be resolvable on the Internet
unless your Exchange and SharePoint servers are going to be communicating with the Rights Management
23 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
connector over the Internet. It is recommended that you don’t change this name once you have configured
Exchange or SharePoint servers to utilize it since that would require that the servers are cleared of all IRM
configurations and reconfigured.
Once the name is created in DNS and pointed to an IP address, you will need to configure load balancing
for that address, pointing it to the connector servers. Any IP-based load balancer can be utilized for this
purpose, including the Network Load Balancing (NLB) component in Windows Server.
Note
For more information on how to configure NLB, see Microsoft TechNet article NETWORK LOAD
BALANCING33.
The load balancing system needs to be configured according to the following criteria:

Port(s): 80 (for HTTP) or 443 (for HTTPS)

Affinity: none

Distribution method: equal
If your connector server is installed in a network that doesn’t have direct Internet connectivity and needs the
manual configuration of a proxy server for outbound Internet access, you can add the following registry
value in each connector server to direct the RMS connector to utilize a proxy.
[HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\AADRM\Connector]
Reg_SZ:ProxyAddress = "http://<ProxyDomainOrIPaddress>:<ProxyPort>"
Where:

<ProxyDomainOrIPaddress> is the DNS FQDN name or the IP address of the proxy

<ProxyPort> the port on which the proxy listens.
After making this change, you will need to reboot the server or perform an iisreset command to make the
change effective.
Configuring the Rights Management connector to use HTTP/SSL
While the use of Transport Layer Security (SSL/TLS) is optional for the connector, it is generally
recommended for any HTTP-based security-sensitive service.
In order to enable communications to the connector using TLS, you need to simply install a server
authentication certificate valid for the name you are going to be utilizing for the connector in IIS in each of
the connector nodes, and bind it to the default web site.
If you configure the Exchange and SharePoint servers to utilize an HTTPS URL to talk to the connector (via
the registry keys indicated below), the connector will automatically use HTTPS for its communications.
There’s no need to modify the connector configuration to use HTTPS. You only need to ensure that all
connector nodes have a valid SSL certificate if you choose to utilize this option.
33
NETWORK LOAD BALANCING: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc732855(v=ws.10).aspx
24 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
In order to request and install a certificate in IIS follow the steps indicated in the article CONFIGURING INTERNET
SERVER CERTIFICATES (IIS 7)34. There are no special requirements for this certificate, other than it must include
as a subject the name by which you will be calling the connector from the Exchange and SharePoint servers.
Authorizing servers to use the Rights Management connector
The only configuration operation necessary to utilize the Rights Management connector is the authorization
of servers that are allowed to use it. You do that by launching the Rights Management connector
administration tool in either a connector server or in a separate computer where the Rights Management
connector administration tool has been installed and adding entries to the Servers allowed to utilize the
connector list.
It is important to note that servers added to the Allowed Servers list may be granted special privileges. All
servers configured as Exchange servers will be granted SuperUser privileges on all the content for this Azure
Rights Management service tenant. You must be careful not to grant this privilege to accounts that are not
going to be used by your organization’s Exchange servers. All other servers will be granted regular user
privileges.
Also of importance is the fact that different servers authorized as a single entry (i.e. by authorizing an Active
Directory group or a Service account utilized by multiple servers, instead of an individual server account) will
share the same RMS certificates, which means that all servers in that group will be considered owners for
content protected by any of the servers in the group. Thus, when authorizing Exchange servers in an
organization it is highly recommended that you authorize all Exchange servers via a single group that
34
CONFIGURING INTERNET SERVER CERTIFICATES (IIS 7): http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc731977(v=WS.10).aspx
25 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
contains them all instead of authorizing them individually. Similarly, when authorizing a SharePoint server
farm, all servers in the farm should be authorized as a group.
In order to add a group of servers to the list of allowed servers, click Add. You will be offered with the option
of entering the name of an object in Active Directory to authorize or to browse your directory to identify the
objects to authorize.
It is important to ensure that the right account is authorized. In order for the server to be allowed to use the
Connector, the account utilized by the service to communicate to the connector service needs to be
authorized. In general, if the service is running as a service account, the service account needs to be
authorized. If it is running as Local System, the computer object (e.g. SERVERNAME$) needs to be authorized.
In general, groups containing the corresponding servers should be used instead of authorizing individual
server names.
In the case of Exchange Servers a group containing all the server objects running Exchange must be utilized.
By default, Exchange creates an Exchange Servers group that contains all Exchange servers in the forest,
this group should be utilized instead of individual servers being authorized separately.
For SharePoint servers, in a default installation of SharePoint the service runs as Local System, so for such
servers you should create a group in Active Directory that contains all the computer objects for the
SharePoint servers in the farm and add that group to the allowed Servers list.
In the recommended configuration, SharePoint runs under a manually configured service account. The
service account utilized to run the SharePoint Central Administration service should be authorized in order
to enable SharePoint to be configured from its admin console. Also, the account configured for the
SharePoint App Pool needs to be authorized for the SharePoint servers themselves to be able to be able to
be activated. Creating a group containing both these accounts, if they are different, may ease the
administration of the configuration.
Configuring servers to use the Rights Management connector
Once the Rights Management connector is ready to run and servers are allowed to utilize the Rights
Management connector, the SharePoint and Exchange servers need to be configured to utilize IRM.
This section describes the pre-requisites and steps utilized to configure Exchange and SharePoint servers to
utilize the Rights Management connector.
26 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Important Note
Once a server is configured to use the Rights Management connector, client applications that
may be installed locally in that same server won’t work against the Azure Rights Management service since they will
try to utilize the connector as well and fail. For example, if Office 2010 is installed locally on an Exchange server, the
client application’s IRM features may work from that computer once the server is configured to use the connector.
This is not a supported scenario, and the client applications should be installed in separate computers and not
configured to use the connector, they should use the Azure Rights Management service directly.
Configuring an Exchange server to utilize the Rights Management
connector
In order to connect to the Azure Rights Management service utilizing the Rights Management connector an
Exchange server must be running one of the following software versions:

Exchange Server 2010 with Exchange 2010 Service Pack 3 Rollup Update 235.

Exchange Server 2013 with Exchange 2013 Cumulative Update 3 36.
The server running Exchange Server requires to use the advanced mode known as "Cryptographic Mode 2”
for rights management operations which might require an update to the RMS client in your server.
Note
To enable the use of this Cryptographic Mode 2 for computers not running Windows Server 2012,
the computer must have the appropriate hotfix applied to the operating system. For computers running
Windows Server 2008, install the hot fix associated with the article 2627272 RSA KEY LENGTH IS INCREASED TO 2048
BITS FOR AD RMS IN WINDOWS SERVER 2008 R2 AND IN WINDOWS SERVER 200837. For computers running Windows Server
2008 R2, install the hotfix package associated with the article 2627273 RSA KEY LENGTH IS INCREASED TO 2048 BITS FOR
AD RMS IN WINDOWS 7 OR IN WINDOWS SERVER 2008 R238.
Exchange 2010 SP3 adds support for Active Directory Rights Management Services (AD RMS) in
Cryptographic Mode 239.
With the Cryptographic Mode 2 operations, RSA encryption is enhanced from 1024 bit encryption to 2048
bit encryption. In addition, hashing is enhanced from using SHA-1 (128 bits) to using SHA-256 (256 bits).
35
Update Rollup 2 For Exchange 2010 SP3 (KB2866475): http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=39835
36
Cumulative Update 3 for Exchange Server 2013 (KB2892464): http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=41175
RSA KEY LENGTH IS INCREASED TO 2048 BITS FOR AD RMS IN WINDOWS SERVER 2008 R2 AND IN WINDOWS SERVER 2008:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2627272
37
RSA KEY LENGTH IS INCREASED TO 2048 BITS FOR AD RMS IN WINDOWS 7 OR IN WINDOWS SERVER 2008 R2:
http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2627273
38
EXCHANGE SERVER 2010 SP3 FAQ: http://blogs.technet.com/b/exchange/archive/2013/02/12/released-exchange-server-2010sp3.aspx
39
27 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Note
For additional information on Cryptographic Mode 2, please refer to the Microsoft TechNet article
ACTIVE DIRECTORY RIGHTS MANAGEMENT SERVICE CRYPTOGRAPHIC MODES40 and the post AD RMS AND CRYPTOGRAPHIC SUPPORT
FOR SHA-2/RSA 204841 on the RMS Team blog.
Once the right software is installed, the server needs to be configured to utilize the Rights Management
connector and then IRM needs to be enabled.
In order to utilize the connector, the following registry values need to be added to the server running the
Exchange environment.
For Exchange Server 2010, the following registry values need to be added to configure the server to utilize
the connector:
HKLM\Software\Microsoft\MSDRM\ServiceLocation\Activation
REG_SZ: [Default] = "https://<MicrosoftRMSURL>/_wmcs/certification"
HKLM\Software\Microsoft\MSDRM\ServiceLocation\EnterprisePublishing
REG_SZ: [Default] = "https://<MicrosoftRMSURL>/_wmcs/Licensing"
HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\ExchangeServer\v14\IRM\CertificationServerRedirection
REG_SZ:"https://<MicrosoftRMSURL>/_wmcs/certification" = "http(s)://<connectorName>/_wmcs/certification"
HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\ExchangeServer\v14\IRM\LicenseServerRedirection
REG_SZ: "https://<MicrosoftRMSURL>/_wmcs/licensing" = "http(s)://<connectorName>/_wmcs/licensing"
For Exchange Server 2013, the following registry values need to be added:
HKLM\Software\Microsoft\MSDRM\ServiceLocation\Activation
REG_SZ: [Default] = "https://<MicrosoftRMSURL>/_wmcs/certification"
HKLM\Software\Microsoft\MSDRM\ServiceLocation\EnterprisePublishing
REG_SZ: [Default] = "https://<MicrosoftRMSURL>/_wmcs/Licensing"
HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\ExchangeServer\v15\IRM\CertificationServerRedirection
REG_SZ:"https://<MicrosoftRMSURL>/_wmcs/certification" = "http(s)://<connectorName>/_wmcs/certification"
HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\ExchangeServer\v15\IRM\LicenseServerRedirection
REG_SZ: "https://<MicrosoftRMSURL>/_wmcs/licensing" = "http(s)://<connectorURL>/_wmcs/licensing"
Where:

<MicrosoftRMSURL> is your organization’s Azure Rights Management service URL (generally in the
form {GUID}.rms.<region>.aadrm.com.

<region> is the region of your organization’s Azure Rights Management service:

40

ap. Asia region.

eu. European Union region.

na. North America region.
<connectorName> is the name you defined in DNS for the connector. The https prefix needs to be
utilized for <connectorName> if you have configured IIS in the connector servers to use this
ACTIVE DIRECTORY RIGHTS MANAGEMENT SERVICE CRYPTOGRAPHIC MODES: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/p/?LinkID=241989
AD RMS AND CRYPTOGRAPHIC SUPPORT FOR SHA-2/RSA 2048: http://blogs.technet.com/b/rms/archive/2012/04/29/ad-rms-andcryptographic-support-for-sha-2-rsa-2048.aspx
41
28 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
protocol. The Azure Rights Management service URLs should always be entered in the registry
indicating the use of HTTPS.
These registry settings tell Exchange that whenever a Rights Management operation must be performed the
calls must be made through the Rights Management connector.
You can obtain the Azure Rights Management service URL for your organization by using the Microsoft
Rights Management administration tools available on the Microsoft Download Center42.
Note
You can also get your Azure Rights Management service URLs tenant by using the cmdlet GetAadrmConfiguration as described later in the paragraph “Getting the URLs of the Azure Rights Management service”.
Once these steps are performed you can enable IRM functionality in Exchange Server.
Note
To learn how to configure IRM in Exchange, see Microsoft TechNet article INFORMATION RIGHTS
MANAGEMENT PROCEDURES43.
To ease the above configuration, you can use the RMS connector server configuration tool available on
Microsoft Connect44. This tool can be utilized to automatically configure Exchange Server to utilize the Rights
Management connector by configuring the above settings in the registry and checking for pre-requisites.
Windows Azure AD Rights Management Administration Tools and Utilities: http://www.microsoft.com/enus/download/details.aspx?id=30339
42
43
INFORMATION RIGHTS MANAGEMENT PROCEDURES: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dd351212(v=exchg.150).aspx
RMS connector server configuration tool:
https://connect.microsoft.com/site1170/Downloads/DownloadDetails.aspx?DownloadID=51408
44
29 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Note
The tool can be run on an Exchange server to configure it to use the Rights Management connector,
or it can be run on a different computer to create .reg files that can be then deployed to the computers for the
same purpose.
The tool can also create a Group Policy Object (GPO) script that can be later run by a domain administrator to create
GPOs that apply the necessary settings on the target computers. Once created, the GPOs need to be linked, targeted
and filtered as desired so these settings are applied to the computers that need to be configured to use the
connector.
To use the tool, you need to launch an elevated Windows PowerShell command prompt and navigate to the
directory where you have download the tool and type “help .\GenConnectorConfig.ps1” for usage. You can add “examples” to the Help command line to see examples of the usage of the tool in different scenarios.
Configuring a SharePoint server to utilize the Rights Management
connector
In order to connect to the Azure Rights Management service utilizing the Rights Management connector a
SharePoint server must be running one of the following software versions:

SharePoint Server 2010

SharePoint Server 2013
SharePoint servers must be running the latest version of the RMS client. For SharePoint Server 2013 that is
the MSIPC client version available at http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=38396.
The MSIPC client is installed by default in the following folder:
%ProgramFiles%\Active Directory Rights Management Services Client 2.x.
For SharePoint 2010 the same MSDRM client version is required as for Exchange servers
(http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2627273 or http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2627272 depending on the
Operating System used for the server).
Furthermore, if using SharePoint Server 2013, the following registry setting needs to be configured on the
server:
30 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\MSIPC\ServiceLocation\LicensingRedirection
REG_SZ: "https://<MicrosoftRMSURL>/_wmcs/licensing"="http://<connectorName>/_wmcs/licensing"
Where:

<MicrosoftRMSURL> is your organization’s Azure Rights Management service URL (generally in the
form {GUID}.rms.<region>.aadrm.com.

<region> is the region of your organization’s Azure Rights Management service:


ap. Asia region.

eu. European Union region.

na. North America region.
<connectorName> is the name you defined in DNS for the connector. The https prefix needs to be
utilized for <connectorName> if you have configured IIS in the connector servers to use this
protocol. The Azure Rights Management service URLs should always be entered in the registry
indicating the use of HTTPS.
To ease the above configuration, you can use the RMS connector server configuration tool available on
Microsoft Connect45. This tool can be utilized to automatically configure SharePoint Server to utilize the
Rights Management connector by configuring the above settings in the registry and checking for prerequisites.
Note
The tool can be run on an SharePoint server to configure it to use the Rights Management connector,
or it can be run on a different computer to create .reg files that can be then deployed to the computers for the
same purpose.
The tool can also create a Group Policy Object (GPO) script that can be later run by a domain administrator to create
GPOs that apply the necessary settings on the target computers. Once created, the GPOs need to be linked, targeted
and filtered as desired so these settings are applied to the computers that need to be configured to use the
connector.
To use the tool, you need to launch an elevated Windows PowerShell command prompt and navigate to the
directory where you have download the tool and type “help .\GenConnectorConfig.ps1” for usage. You can add “examples” to the Help command line to see examples of the usage of the tool in different scenarios.
Once the right software is installed and the necessary registry changes have been made, IRM needs to be
enabled in SharePoint by following the instructions in the Microsoft TechNet article PLAN INFORMATION RIGHTS
MANAGEMENT (SHAREPOINT SERVER 2010)46.
When enabling IRM in SharePoint Server as per the steps in the article linked above, you have to point
SharePoint Server to the Rights Management connector by utilizing the option Use this RMS server and
entering the Rights Management connector URL as defined by you. Only the protocol prefix (http:// or
https://) and the server name of the connector must be entered.
RMS connector server configuration tool:
https://connect.microsoft.com/site1170/Downloads/DownloadDetails.aspx?DownloadID=51408
45
PLAN INFORMATION RIGHTS MANAGEMENT (SHAREPOINT SERVER 2010): http://technet.microsoft.com/enus/library/hh545608(v=office.14).aspx
46
31 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
After IRM has been enabled on a SharePoint farm, you can enable IRM in on individual libraries by using the
Information Rights Management option in the Library Settings page for each of the libraries.
32 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Testing and evaluating the Rights Management
connector installation
As its title suggests, this section guides you through a set of instructions required to build a representative
test lab environment. Considering the involved products and technologies that encompass such an
environment - Active Directory, Internet Information Services (IIS), Exchange Server, SharePoint Server to
name a few - and the related required configuration, we’ve tried to streamlined and to ease as much as
possible the way to build a suitable test lab environment, to consequently reduce the number of instructions
that tell you what servers to create, how to configure the operating systems and core platform services, and
how to install and configure the required core products and technologies, and, at the end, to reduce the
overall effort that is needed.
We hope that the provided experience will enable you to see all of the components and the configuration
steps on both the front-end and back-end that go into such a multi-products and services solution.
Building the on-premises test lab environment
A challenge in creating a useful test lab environment is to enable their reusability and extensibility. Because
creating a test lab can represent a significant investment of time and resources, your ability to reuse and
extend the work required to create the test lab is important. An ideal test lab environment would enable you
to create a basic lab configuration, save that configuration, and then build out multiple test lab scenarios in
the future by starting with the base configuration.
For that reason and considering the above objectives, this guide will use for the corporate on-premises
infrastructure the Microsoft Test Lab Guides (TLGs) available on Microsoft TechNet to build the test lab
environment to test and evaluate the Microsoft Right Management connector.
The Microsoft Test Lab Guides (TLGs) allow you to get valuable hands-on experience with new products and
technologies using a pre-defined and tested methodology that results in a working configuration.
Microsoft Test Lab Guides (TLGs) are a set of documents that step you through the configuration and
demonstration of a Microsoft technology or product in a standardized test lab environment, which starts
with a common base configuration that mimics a simplified intranet and the Internet. TLGs are designed to
be modular, extensible, and stackable to configure complex, multi-product solutions. TLGs make learning
about products, technologies, and solutions easier by providing that crucial hands-on, “I built it out myself”
experience.
33 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Note
For more information, see Test Lab Guides47 on Microsoft TechNet.
The setup of the on-premises environment for this evaluation of the Microsoft Right Management connector
is based on the TEST LAB GUIDE: CONFIGURE AN INTEGRATED EXCHANGE, LYNC, AND SHAREPOINT TEST LAB48. A TLG
stack is a set of dependent TLGs that, when configured from the bottom of the stack, create a meaningful
test lab configuration. This TLG is at the top of the following TLG stack:

TEST LAB GUIDE MINI-MODULE: INSTALLING MICROSOFT OFFICE PROFESSIONAL PLUS 2013 ON CLIENT149.

TEST LAB GUIDE: INSTALL EXCHANGE SERVER 201350.

TEST LAB GUIDE: INSTALL SQL SERVER 2012 ENTERPRISE51.

TEST LAB GUIDE MINI-MODULE: BASIC PKI FOR WINDOWS SERVER 201252.

TEST LAB GUIDE: WINDOWS SERVER 2012 BASE CONFIGURATION53.
This TLG describes how to configure a test lab consisting of servers running Exchange Server 2013, Lync
Server 2013, and SharePoint Server 2013 by using six server computers and two client computers. After
verifying that all three types of servers are working, you then configure server-to-server trust relationships
between them. The resulting test lab can be typically used as a basis for scenarios and solutions that use a
combination of Exchange Server 2013, SharePoint Server 2013, (and Lync Server 2013,) and Office 2013. In
the specific context of this document, this will represent our on-premises collaboration environment for
testing and evaluating the Azure Rights Management service along with the Rights Management connector
for Information Protection and Control (IPC) on-premises.
Note
For information about how to deploy Exchange Server 2013 in a pilot or production environment, see
Planning and Deployment: Exchange 2013 Help. For information about how to deploy SharePoint Server 2013 in a
pilot or production environment, see Install and deploy SharePoint 2013. (For information about how to deploy
Lync Server 2013 in a pilot or production environment, see Deployment for Lync Server 2013.)
By following the instructions outlined in the above TLG you should be able to successfully prepare your test
lab environment based on virtual machines (VM) to later deploy the Azure Rights Management service,
install and configure the Rights Management connector, and start evaluating/using it within your
organization to create and consume protected content.
47
Microsoft TechNet Test Lab Guides: http://www.microsoft.com/testlabguides
TEST LAB GUIDE: CONFIGURE AN INTEGRATED EXCHANGE, LYNC, AND SHAREPOINT TEST LAB: http://www.microsoft.com/enus/download/confirmation.aspx?id=39616
48
TEST LAB GUIDE MINI-MODULE: INSTALLING MICROSOFT OFFICE PROFESSIONAL PLUS 2013 ON CLIENT1:
http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/13354.test-lab-guide-mini-module-installing-microsoft-office-professionalplus-2013-on-client1.aspx
49
TEST LAB GUIDE: INSTALL EXCHANGE SERVER 2013: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/15392.test-lab-guideinstall-exchange-server-2013.aspx
50
51
TEST LAB GUIDE: INSTALL SQL SERVER 2012 ENTERPRISE: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=29572
TEST LAB GUIDE MINI-MODULE: BASIC PKI FOR WINDOWS SERVER 2012:
http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/7862.test-lab-guide-mini-module-basic-pki-for-windows-server-2012.aspx
52
53
TEST LAB GUIDE: WINDOWS SERVER 2012 BASE CONFIGURATION: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=29010
34 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Important note
Individual virtual machines (VM) are needed to separate the services provided on the network
and to clearly show the desired functionality. This being said, the suggested configuration to later evaluate the
Rights Management connector is neither designed to reflect best practices nor does it reflect a desired or
recommended configuration for a production network. The configuration, including IP addresses and all other
configuration parameters, is designed only to work on a separate test lab networking environment.
Any modifications that you make to the configuration details provided in the rest of this document may affect or
limit your chances of successfully setting up the on-premises collaboration environment that will serve as the basis
for the integration with the Azure Rights Management service in the Cloud.
Microsoft has successfully built the suggested environment with the Windows Server 2012 Hyper-V virtualization
technology, Windows Server 2012 and Windows 8 Pro virtual machines.
The on-premises test infrastructure is deployed by using the following:

One computer running Windows Server 2012 named DC1 that is configured as a domain controller,
Domain Name System (DNS) server, and DHCP server.

One intranet member server running Windows Server 2012 named SQL1 that is configured as a SQL
database server.

One intranet member server running Windows Server 2012 named EX1 that is configured as the
Exchange Server 2013 email server.

One (optional) intranet member server running Windows Server 2012 named LYNC1 that is
configured as the Lync Server 2013 Standard Edition server.

One intranet member server running Windows Server 2012 named SP1 that is configured as an
enterprise root certification authority (PKI server) and a SharePoint Server 2013 Web server.

One intranet member server running Windows Server 2012 named EDGE1 that is configured as an
Internet edge Web server.

One client computer running Windows 8 named CLIENT1.

One client computer running Windows 8 named CLIENT2.
The above virtual machines (VM) will enable you to create snapshots so that you can easily return to a
desired configuration for further learning and experimentation.
Note
The above virtual machines (VM) will enable you to create snapshots so that you can easily return to
a desired configuration for further learning and experimentation.
The integrated test lab consists of:

A single subnet named Corpnet (10.0.0.0/24) that simulates a private intranet. Computers on the
Corpnet subnet connect by using a private virtual network switch on the Hyper-V host machine.
These computers are DC1, SQL1, EX1, LYNC1, SP1, EDGE1, CLIENT1, and CLIENT2.

A subnet named Internet that provides Internet connectivity and that is separated from the Corpnet
subnet by the EDGE1 machine. Computers on the Internet subnet connect by using an external
virtual network switch on the Hyper-V host machine. These computers are EDGE1, CLIENT1, and
CLIENT2.
35 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
DC1
SQL1
EX1
LYNC1
SP1
EDGE1
Internet
Internal Virtual Network Switch
Corpnet (10.0.0.0/24)
External Virtual Network Switch
Internet
CLIENT1
CLIENT2
The EDGE1, CLIENT1 and CLIENT2 machines must have two network adapters installed. Connect one
adapter to the virtual network switch for the Corpnet subnet, and connect the second adapter to the
external virtual network switch for the Internet subnet. The external virtual network switch
configuration must provide Internet connectivity via the external network.
The following nine steps as outlined by the above top-level TLG must be followed in order to set up the onpremises core infrastructure of our test lab:
1.
Setting up the Windows Server 2012 Base Configuration test lab.
2.
Installing and configuring a new server named SQL1.
3.
Installing SQL Server 2012 on SQL1.
4.
Installing and configuring a new client computer named CLIENT2.
5.
Installing and configuring Exchange Server 2013 on EX1.
6.
Installing and configuring a new server named LYNC1 (Optional).
7.
Installing Lync Server 2013 Standard Edition on LYNC1 (Optional).
8.
Installing SharePoint Server 2013 on SP1.
9.
Configuring integration between EX1, LYNC1, and SP1 (Optional).
The following subsections outline the minor discrepancies if any for our test lab and provide any additional
information details necessary to (hopefully) successfully build such a test lab.
In order to later define a federated domain in the Azure Active Directory tenant, we’ve opted not to
configure the domain corp.contoso.com as described in the TLG and choose the domain corpcontoso.com instead. Consequently, in our case, whenever a reference to CORP is made in a
procedure, it has been replaced by CORP-CONTOSO to reflect accordingly the change in naming.
Likewise, a reference to corp.contoso.com is substituted by corp-contoso.com.
Choose a domain name of your choice whose DNS domain name is currently not in used on the
Internet. For checking purpose, you can for instance use the domain search capability provided by several
popular domain name registrars such as Go Daddy.
Furthermore, for the sake of simplicity, the same password [email protected] is used throughout the procedures
of the above TLGs as well as the ones detailed in this document. This is neither mandatory nor
recommended in a real world scenario.
36 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Finally, to perform all the tasks in this guide, use the Contoso domain Administrator account User1 for each
Windows Server 2012 VM, unless instructed otherwise.
Setting up the Windows Server 2012 Base Configuration test lab
As described in the top-level TLG, setup the Base Configuration test lab for the Corpnet subnet using the
procedures in Section § STEPS FOR CONFIGURING THE CORPNET SUBNET of the TEST LAB GUIDE: WINDOWS SERVER 2012
BASE CONFIGURATION54.
This said, for the Subsection § STEP 3: CONFIGURE CLIENT1, please keep in mind that CLIENT1 has two networks
adapters in our configuration, one connected to the Corpnet subnet, and an additional one connected to
the Internet subnet. The configuration of the second one – not covered in the TLG - must ensure Internet
connectivity to CLIENT1 and obviously depends on your own specifics environment. Please configure the
TCP/IP properties of the second network adapter to provide such a connectivity in accordance to your own
specificities.
Eventually, follow the instructions of the Subsection § STEP 1: CONFIGURE EDGE1 of the Section § STEPS FOR
CONFIGURING THE INTERNET SUBNET. Similarly to CLIENT1, the configuration of the second network adapter
connected to the Internet subnet must ensure Internet connectivity. Consequently, please do not follow the
related instructions of the TLG and configure the TCP/IP properties of this adapter to provide such a
connectivity in accordance to your own specificities.
As described, you also need to add a public key infrastructure to the test lab using the procedures in the
TEST LAB GUIDE MINI-MODULE: BASIC PKI FOR WINDOWS SERVER 201255, substituting SP1 for APP1 in the
instructions.
Installing and configuring a new server named SQL1
Simply follow the procedures described in the TLG. We have no specific additions and/or discrepancies.
Installing SQL Server 2012 on SQL1
Install and configure SQL Server 2012 on SQL1 as described in Steps 2, 3, and 4 of the SQL SERVER 2012 TEST
LAB GUIDE56. Follow the procedures described in the TLG, substituting SQL1 for APP1 in the instructions. Please
note that the machine is running Windows Server 2012 in lieu of Windows Server 2008 R2. As consequence,
when asked to install the .NET Framework, you should select in the Features list .NET Framework 3.5
(includes .NET 2.0 and 3.0) under .NET Framework 3.5 Features in lieu of .NET Framework 3.5.1
Features.
54
TEST LAB GUIDE: WINDOWS SERVER 2012 BASE CONFIGURATION: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=29010
TEST LAB GUIDE MINI-MODULE: BASIC PKI FOR WINDOWS SERVER 2012:
http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/7862.test-lab-guide-mini-module-basic-pki-for-windows-server-2012.aspx
55
56
TEST LAB GUIDE: INSTALL SQL SERVER 2012 ENTERPRISE: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=29572
37 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Installing and configuring a new client computer named CLIENT2
As already mentioned for CLIENT1, CLIENT2 in our configuration has two networks adapters: one connected
to the Corpnet subnet, and an additional one connected to the Internet subnet. The configuration of the
second one – not covered in the top level TLG - must ensure Internet connectivity to CLIENT2 and obviously
depends on your own specifics environment. Please configure the TCP/IP properties of the second network
adapter to provide such a connectivity in accordance to your own specificities.
Installing and configuring Exchange Server 2013 on EX1
Follow the instructions in Steps 2-5 of TEST LAB GUIDE: INSTALL EXCHANGE SERVER 201357. Please note that the
EX1 machine is running Windows Server 2012 in our configuration in lieu of Windows Server 2008 R2 SP1.
As a consequence, for Step 4, the prerequisites for Exchange Server 2003 are the ones listed for the Mailbox
server role for Windows Server 2012 in the eponym Microsoft TechNet article EXCHANGE 2013 PREREQUISITES58.
To install these prerequisites, proceed with the following steps:
1.
Open an elevated Windows PowerShell command prompt and run the following command to install
the required Windows components:
PS C:\Windows\System32> Install-WindowsFeature AS-HTTP-Activation, Desktop-Experience, NET-Framework-45-Features, RPCover-HTTP-proxy, RSAT-Clustering, RSAT-Clustering-CmdInterface, RSAT-Clustering-Mgmt, RSAT-Clustering-PowerShell, WebMgmt-Console, WAS-Process-Model, Web-Asp-Net45, Web-Basic-Auth, Web-Client-Auth, Web-Digest-Auth, Web-Dir-Browsing, WebDyn-Compression, Web-Http-Errors, Web-Http-Logging, Web-Http-Redirect, Web-Http-Tracing, Web-ISAPI-Ext, Web-ISAPI-Filter,
Web-Lgcy-Mgmt-Console, Web-Metabase, Web-Mgmt-Console, Web-Mgmt-Service, Web-Net-Ext45, Web-Request-Monitor, Web-Server,
Web-Stat-Compression, Web-Static-Content, Web-Windows-Auth, Web-WMI, Windows-Identity-Foundation
2.
After you’ve installed the operating system roles and features, install the following software in the
order shown hereafter:
a.
Microsoft Unified Communications Managed API 4.0, Core Runtime 64-bit59
b. Microsoft Office 2010 Filter Pack 64 bit60
c.
Microsoft Office 2010 Filter Pack SP1 64 bit 61
To complete the configuration, install Microsoft Office Professional Plus 2013 on both CLIENT1 and CLIENT2
as described in the TEST LAB GUIDE MINI-MODULE: INSTALLING MICROSOFT OFFICE PROFESSIONAL PLUS 2013 ON
CLIENT162, substituting CLIENT2 for CLIENT1 in the instructions for the CLIENT2 machine.
TEST LAB GUIDE: INSTALL EXCHANGE SERVER 2013: http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/15392.test-lab-guideinstall-exchange-server-2013.aspx
57
58
EXCHANGE 2013 PREREQUISITES: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb691354.aspx#WS2012MBX
59
Microsoft Unified Communications Managed API 4.0, Core Runtime 64-bit: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/p/?linkId=258269
60
Microsoft Office 2010 Filter Pack 64 bit: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/p/?linkID=191548
61
Microsoft Office 2010 Filter Pack SP1 64 bit: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/p/?LinkId=254043
TEST LAB GUIDE MINI-MODULE: INSTALLING MICROSOFT OFFICE PROFESSIONAL PLUS 2013 ON CLIENT1:
http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/13354.test-lab-guide-mini-module-installing-microsoft-office-professionalplus-2013-on-client1.aspx
62
38 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Installing and configuring a new server named LYNC1
This procedure is optional. If you want to deploy a Lync Server 2013 in your test lab, follow the procedures
described in the TLG.
Installing Lync Server 2013 Standard Edition on LYNC1
This procedure is optional. If you opt to deploy a Lync Server 2013 in your test lab in the previous step,
follow the procedures described in the TLG. When defining and configuring the topology, please note that
the Lync file store share Files must be created before defining the file store. You can create this folder where
ever you want but for this test lab we will create a folder called “Files” in C:\ of the LYNC1.
In addition, you need to grant full access permissions to the following Active Directory groups:

RTCHS Universal Services

RTC Component Universal Services

RTC Universal Server Admins

RTC Universal Config Replicator
To share the folder and grant the above groups the appropriate permissions on this file share, proceed with
the following steps:
1.
Right-click the newly created folder and select Properties. The Files Properties dialog appears.
2.
Select the Sharing tab.
3.
Click Share. A File Sharing wizard pops up.
39 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
4.
Click the dropdown beside Add and select Find People… A Select Users or Groups dialog opens
up.
5.
Type “RTC” in Enter the object names to select (examples): and click Check Names. A Multiple
Names Found dialog opens up.
6.
Press the CTRL key, select the above groups, and then click OK twice.
40 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
7.
Change each newly added group to Read/Write and click Share.
The publishing wizard should run without encountering any error. You can then proceed with the installation
of the Lync server 2013 core components.
Installing SharePoint Server 2013 on SP1
Follow the procedures described in the TLG.
Configuring integration between EX1, LYNC1, and SP1
To support integrated scenarios and solutions, servers must be able to request resources from each other
in a secure way. Server-to-server authentication is a new feature of Exchange Server 2013, SharePoint Server
2013, and Lync Server 2013 that allows a server to request resources of another server on behalf of a user.
This feature uses the industry standard Open Authorization (OAuth) 2.0 protocol. Server-to-server
authentication enables many new scenarios such as eDiscovery, high-resolution user photos, and site
mailboxes (see Section § LEVERAGING THE INPLACE EDISCOVERY & HOLD FEATURE later in this document).
This step is completely optional in the context of this paper. If you nevertheless want to implement it, we
outline in the following sections the various changes that are necessary.
Configuring the server-to-server trust from SP1 and EX1 to LYNC1
You can skip this section if you haven’t deployed LYNC1 in your test lab.
Please note that the content provided in the TLG for the s2sauth.ps1 Windows PowerShell script contains
some typos. So you must proceed with the following replacements to make it work as expected and also to
reflect the chosen domain name for Active Directory in your test lab:

Search for https//ex1.corp.constoso.com/autodiscover/metadata/json/1 and replace it by
https//ex1.corp-contoso.com/autodiscover/metadata/json/1. Please note that corpcontoso.com in the URL should also be replaced by the name of your Active Directory domain to
accommodate your own deployment option of the test lab.

Search for https//ex1.corp.contoso.com/autodiscover/metadata/json/1 and replace it by
https//ex1.corp-contoso.com/autodiscover/metadata/json/1.
Please
note
that
orp-
41 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
contoso.com in the URL should also be replaced by the name of your Active Directory domain to
accommodate your own deployment option of the test lab.

Search for https//sp1.corp.contoso.com/_layouts/15/metadata/json and replace it by
https//sp1.corp-contoso.com/_layouts/15/metadata/json/1.
Please
note
that
corpcontoso.com in the URL should also be replaced by the name of your Active Directory domain to
accommodate your own deployment option of the test lab.
Furthermore, since the script s2sauth.ps1 isn’t signed, you may need to change the script execution policy
prior to running the script on LYNC1.
To verify that Windows PowerShell can run the created script on LYNC1, proceed with the following steps:
1.
Whilst still being logged as CORP-CONTOSO\User1 on LYNC1, open an elevated Windows
PowerShell command prompt, and, at the command prompt, run the following command:
PS C:\Windows\system32>Get-ExecutionPolicy
2.
If the value returned is anything other than RemoteSigned or Unrestricted, you need to change
the value to RemoteSigned. Run the following command if needed:
PS C:\Windows\system32>Set-ExecutionPolicy RemoteSigned
Note
When you set the script execution policy to RemoteSigned, you can only run scripts that you create
on your computer or scripts that are signed by a trusted source. For additional information, see the Microsoft
TechNet article ABOUT_EXECUTION_POLICIES63.
Configuring the server-to-server trusts from SP1 and LYNC1 to EX1
Replace the corp.contoso.com by your own domain name in the various URLs of the provided commands,
which is corp-contoso.com in our case. Furthermore, do not run the following command if you haven’t
deployed LYNC1 in your test lab:
.\Configure-EnterprisePartnerApplication.ps1 -AuthMetadataUrl https://lync1.corp-contoso.com/metadata/json/1 ApplicationType Lync
Configuring the server-to-server trusts from EX1 and LYNC1 to SP1
Similarly to the previous section, replace the corp.contoso.com by your own domain name in the various
URLs of the provided commands, which is corp-contoso.com in our case.
Furthermore, before running the first command, make sure that the SharePoint App Management Service is
running. Proceed as follows:
1.
63
From the Start screen, click SharePoint 2013 Management Shell.
ABOUT_EXECUTION_POLICIES:
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkID=135170
42 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
2.
At the Windows PowerShell command prompt, run the following command:
PS C:\Users\User1>Get-SPServiceApplication | where {$_.Name –like “App Management”}
3.
If the App Management Service is missing, then the service instance is likely not started on SP1. In
this case:
a.
From the Start screen, click SharePoint 2013 Central Administration. A User Account
Control dialog appears.
b. Click Yes.
c.
Under Central Administration on the left side, click System Settings.
d. On the System Settings page, click Manage services on server under Servers.
e.
On the Services on Server page, start the service instance.
If you do not follow the above step, you will be likely to encounter an error when executing the GetSPAppPrincipal command.
Finally, do not run the following command if you haven’t deployed LYNC1 in your test lab:
New-SPTrustedSecurityTokenIssuer –MetadataEndpoint "https://lync1.corp.contoso.com/metadata/json/1" –IsTrustBroker –Name
"Lync Server"
At this stage, your on-premises environment should up and running and ready for the next steps.
43 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Creating an Azure Active Directory/Office 365 tenant and
activating the Azure Rights Management service
Choose one of the option outlined in Section § CONFIGURE THE AZURE Rights Management service
Creating your tenant earlier in this document and follow the related steps. For the course of this step-bystep, we’ve provisioned an Office 365 Enterprise (E3) tenant: demorms.onmicrosoft.com.
Setting up the directory synchronization and the federation with
the tenant
As previously outlined, the use of the Rights Management connector requires that accounts in Azure Active
Directory are synchronized with the on-premises Active Directory, i.e. the domain corp-contoso.com in our
implementation of the test lab. Furthermore, federation between the on-premises Active Directory and
Azure Active Directory can be enabled to offer a more seamless user experience through single sign-on to
the Azure Rights Management service.
The page SET UP AND MANAGE SINGLE SIGN-ON64 on the Microsoft Online Portal provides an overview of the
various steps to conduct in order to achieve such an integration between your on-premises environment
and your Azure Rights Management service tenant.
64
SET UP AND MANAGE SINGLE SIGN-ON: https://portal.microsoftonline.com/IdentityFederation/IdentityFederation.aspx
44 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Note
For an overview on the above steps, see the Microsoft TechNet articles CONFIGURE DIRECTORY SYNCHRONIZATION65 and
CONFIGURE SINGLE SIGN-ON66.
Since our test lab environment represents a fairly simple single forest scenario in terms of integrating the
on-premises identity infrastructure with the Azure Rights Management service tenant, we leverage the QUICK
START GUIDE FOR INTEGRATING A SINGLE FOREST ON-PREMISES ACTIVE DIRECTORY WITH WINDOWS AZURE AD67 available
on the wiki of Microsoft TechNet and more especially the Windows PowerShell script68 that accompanies the
guide to implement on top of our test lab environment such an integration.
By notably leveraging the available Windows PowerShell cmdlets to manage Azure Active Directory, this
script is indeed designed to configure two Windows Server 2012 machines with a full federation (AD FS, AD
FS proxy (optional), and DirSync) to Azure Active Directory where you already have an existing on-premises
AD in a single forest, which is thankfully our case at this stage of the test lab environment.
Note
For information on how to manage Azure Active Directory using Windows PowerShell, see the Microsoft TechNet
article MANAGE WINDOWS AZURE AD USING WINDOWS POWERSHELL69.
For the sake of simplicity, and to set up the directory synchronization and the federation between the onpremises infrastructure of our test lab and the Azure Rights Management service tenant in the Cloud, we
will not implement the AD FS proxy’s optional step and only installed AD FS and DirSync on EDGE1.
Consequently, the following seven main steps must be followed:
1.
Installing the prerequisite software on EDGE1.
2.
Adding and verifying the domain name in the Azure Rights Management service tenant.
3.
Adding the domain verification record to the external DNS.
4.
Enabling the Directory Synchronization tool (DirSync) on the Azure Rights Management service
tenant.
5.
Configuring AD FS on EDGE1.
65
CONFIGURE DIRECTORY SYNCHRONIZATION: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh967643.aspx
66
CONFIGURE SINGLE SIGN-ON: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/hh967628.aspx
67
QUICK START GUIDE FOR INTEGRATING A SINGLE FOREST ON-PREMISES ACTIVE DIRECTORY WITH WINDOWS AZURE AD: http://aka.ms/AD2AAD
68
AD TO WINDOWS AZURE AD QUICKSTART: http://aka.ms/AD2AAD-PS
69
MANAGE WINDOWS AZURE AD USING WINDOWS POWERSHELL: http://aka.ms/aadposh
45 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
6.
Configuring Azure Active Directory Federation Support.
7.
Installing and configuring DirSync on EDGE1.
The following subsections describe in the context of our test lab environment the use of the above script,
outline the minor discrepancies if any for our test lab and provide any additional information details
necessary to (hopefully) successfully build the identity integration between the test lab and the Azure Active
Directory/Office 365 tenant in the cloud for the Azure Rights Management service.
Installing the prerequisite software on EDGE1
Unless noticed otherwise, all the instructions should be done on the EDGE1 machine.
Installing the Microsoft Online Sign-In Assistant (MOS SIA)
The Windows PowerShell script of the quick start guide doesn’t point to the latest version of the Microsoft
Online Services Sign-In Assistant (MOS SIA) 7.0, which is 7.250.4551.0 as of this writing. So we will install it
manually.
Note
The Microsoft Online Services Sign-In Assistant (MOS SIA) 7.0 provides end user sign-in capabilities
to Microsoft Online Services, such Office 365 and the Azure Rights Management service. In the context of this
paper, the MOS SIA is used to authenticate users to these services through a set of dynamic link library files (DLLs)
and a Windows service as described in the community article DESCRIPTION OF MICROSOFT ONLINE SERVICES SIGN-IN
ASSISTANT (MOS SIA)70.
To install the Microsoft Online Sign-In Assistant (MOS SIA) 7.0 on the EDGE1 machine, proceed with the
following steps:
1.
On EDGE1, log on as the domain administrator CORP-CONTOSO\User1.
2.
Open a browser session and navigate to the following link: Microsoft Online Services Sign-In
Assistant for IT Professionals RTW 71 and click Download.
3.
In the Choose the download you want page, check msoidcli_64bit.msi.msi and click Next.
The Microsoft Online Services Sign-in Assistant Setup wizard opens.
70
DESCRIPTION OF MICROSOFT ONLINE SERVICES SIGN-IN ASSISTANT (MOS SIA): http://community.office365.com/en-us/w/office/534.aspx
71
Microsoft Online Services Sign-In Assistant for IT Professionals RTW: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=286152
46 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
4.
On the license terms page, select I accept the terms in the License Agreement and Privacy
Statement and click Install. A User Account Control dialog pops up.
5.
In the User Account Control dialog, click Yes to execute the setup.
6.
On the completion page, click Finish.
47 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Setting up the execution policy for the quick start guide’s Windows PowerShell
script
To verify that Windows PowerShell can run the downloaded script on EDGE1, proceed with the following
steps:
1.
Whilst still being logged as CORP-CONTOSO\User1 on EDGE1, open an elevated Windows
PowerShell command prompt, and, at the command prompt, run the following command:
PS C:\Windows\system32>Get-ExecutionPolicy
2.
If the value returned is anything other than RemoteSigned or Unrestricted, you need to change
the value to RemoteSigned. Run the following command if needed:
PS C:\Windows\system32>Set-ExecutionPolicy RemoteSigned
When invited, press “Y” to confirm the operation.
Disabling the IE Enhanced Security Configuration (ESC)
Depending on the selected choice in the menu of the script, the script may download files from the Internet
and should consequently be authorized to conduct such an operation.
Since the script is intended to run on a test lab environment, the IE Enhanced Security Configuration should
be disabled for the course of the setup operations. The script handles that for you as illustrated hereafter:
48 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Installing Azure Active Directory Module for Windows PowerShell
The Azure Active Directory Module for Windows PowerShell provides corporate administrators the ability to
complete many Azure Active Directory/Office 365 tenant-based administrative tasks within Windows
PowerShell.
Note
A Windows PowerShell "module" is a package that contains Windows PowerShell commands, cmdlets,
providers, functions, variables, and aliases. The Azure Active Directory Module for Windows PowerShell is a
separate installation package which includes cmdlets specifically designed for Azure Active Directory tenant-based
administration.
The Azure Active Directory Module for Windows PowerShell cmdlets mirror the administrative functions tenant
administrators can complete with the Microsoft Online Services Portal (MOP). Administrators can leverage the
Azure Active Directory Module for Windows PowerShell cmdlets to streamline Azure Active Directory/Office 365
tenant-based administrative tasks that would otherwise be time consuming in the MOP GUI environment (such as
running administration tasks in bulk against a set of users for example). The Azure Active Directory Module for
Windows PowerShell cmdlets were previously known as the Microsoft Online Services Module for Windows
PowerShell cmdlets.
For more information, see the article MANAGE WINDOWS AZURE AD BY USING WINDOWS POWERSHELL72.
Administrative privileges are needed on the local computer in order to install the Azure Active Directory
Module.
To install the module on EDGE1, proceed with the following steps:
1.
Whilst still being logged as CORP-CONTOSO\User1 on EDGE1, open an elevated Windows
PowerShell command prompt, and, at the command prompt, run the following command:
PS C:\Windows\system32>C:\Menu.ps1
2.
72
When prompted Enter your selection, type “2” to select choice 2 in the menu. The script proceeds
with the download and the installation of Azure Active Directory Module for Windows PowerShell.
Manage Windows Azure AD by using Windows Powershell: http://aka.ms/aadposh
49 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Enter your selection: 2
-------------------------------------------------------------------------Install Microsoft Online Services Module for Windows PowerShell
-------------------------------------------------------------------------Checking to see if machine already has product Microsoft Online Services Sign-in Assistant installed…
Product is already installed, will not reinstall.
Checking to see if machine already has product Microsoft Online Services Module for Windows PowerShell installed…
Downloading C:\\AdministrationConfig-en.msi
from http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/p/?linkid=236297
please wait…
Installing MSI C:\\AdministrationConfig-en.msi
please wait…
Installation complete.
Completed. Press “Enter” to continue.
3.
Press ENTER to return to the main menu of the script.
Adding and verifying the domain name in the Azure Rights
Management service tenant
Perform all steps in this section on EDGE1 logged in as the domain administrator CORP-CONTOSO\User1.
Adding the local UPN suffix as domain in the Azure Rights Management service
tenant
On EDGE1, proceed with the following steps:
1.
Back to the main menu of the script running in an elevated Windows PowerShell command prompt,
type “4” to select choice 4 in the menu when prompted Enter your selection. You will then be
prompted for your credentials.
50 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
2.
Enter your Azure Active Directory/Office 365 Enterprise credentials (the set of credentials should
have Global Administrator privilege) and wait to be authenticated. In the Windows PowerShell
Credential Request window that opens up, provide the credentials for the Office 365 Enterprise
global administrator account such as:
Username: [email protected]
Password: ****************
Since in our test lab environment, there is only one UPN suffix active, e.g. corp-contoso.com, the
script assume that this is the one to add.
Note
If you have a multiple domain forest with a single tree, you would want to first add the top-level
domain (for example, contoso.com) and then add the child domain names (for example, corp.contoso.com). In such
case, the script enables to select the UPN suffix you would like to add. Also note that the tool only lists domains
which have not yet been added to Azure Active Directory.
Enter your selection: 4
--------------------------------------------------------------------------Add local UPN suffix as domain in Windows Azure Active Directory
--------------------------------------------------------------------------Attempting to load system module MSOnline
Checking for connection to Microsoft Online Services…
Getting credentials for connecting to Microsoft Online Services tenant.
Checking for unused UPN suffixes…
51 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Local Windows Feature RSAT-AD-Powershell missing, installing…
Attempting to load system module ActiveDirectory
Name
----corp-contoso.com
------
Status
-------------Unverified
Federated
Authentication
Domain verification code: ms78729055
Completed. Press “Enter” to continue.
3.
Press ENTER to return to the main menu of the script.
Adding the domain verification record to the external DNS
For the added UPN suffix domain, add a text record for the domain that matches the verification information
to external, public DNS.
On EDGE1, proceed with the following steps:
1.
Back to the main menu of the script running in an elevated Windows PowerShell command prompt,
type “5” to select choice 5 in the menu when prompted Enter your selection. You will then be
prompted for your credentials.
Enter your selection: 5
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Retrieve verification information for domains in Windows Azure Active Directory
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------Getting unverified domain list…
Domain Name
----------corp-contoso.com
Verification Value
------------------ms78729055
Completed. Press “Enter” to continue
2.
Press ENTER to return to the main menu of the script.
In our illustration, the information to add consists in a TXT record with the value “MS=ms78729055”
Note
For more information on this process, including detailed steps for several popular domain name
registrars, see the Microsoft TechNet article VERIFY A DOMAIN73.
To add the TXT record, proceed with the following steps:
Note
For more information on verifying a domain à Go Daddy, see the eponym Microsoft TechNet article
VERIFY A DOMAIN AT GO DADDY74.
1.
Open a browsing session with the browser of your choice from your local machine and navigate to
http://www.godaddy.com/ and click Sign In. in the upper right corner. A Sign in dialog appears.
73
VERIFY A DOMAIN: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj151788.aspx
74
VERIFY A DOMAIN AT GO DADDY: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj151773.aspx
52 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
2.
Enter your credentials and click Sign In. Once authenticated, The My Account page
(https://mya.goddady.com) opens up.
3.
On the Products tab, at the end of the DOMAINS row, click Launch.
4.
On the Domains page, find the domain name in which the service discovery records should be
added, in our case corp-contoso.com.
5.
Click the domain name, in our case CORP-CONTOSO.COM. The Domain Details page opens in a
new tab in your browser.
53 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
6.
Click DNS Zone File in the toolbar.
…
54 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
7.
Click Add Record. An Add Zone Record dialog opens up.
8.
Click the down arrow for the Record type: box and select TXT (Text). The Add DNS Record dialog
displays the related fields.
a.
For Host:, type [email protected]
b. For TXT Value:, type “MS=” followed by the verification value provided by the script:
“MS=ms78729055” in our case.
c.
9.
For TTL:, leave the value set to 1 Hour.
Click Finish to close the dialog.
10. Click Save Changes to save your new TXT record.
11. Scroll down to the TXT (Text). You should see the newly added TXT record.
12. Click OK.
55 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Enabling the Directory Synchronization tool (DirSync) on the Azure
Rights Management service tenant
On EDGE1, proceed with the following steps to enable the Directory Synchronization (DirSync) support in
your Azure Active Directory/Office 365 tenant:
1.
Back to the main menu of the script running in an elevated Windows PowerShell command prompt,
type “6” to select choice 6 in the menu when prompted Enter your selection. You will then be
prompted for your credentials.
2.
Press ENTER to return to the main menu of the script.
Note
This process can take up to 24 hours, although it rarely takes longer than an hour. You will enable the
setting here, but not use it until later; this will give Azure Active Directory time to complete processing the
request while you continue with further steps.
Configuring AD FS on EDGE1
This step enables to create a basic on-premises Active Directory Federation Services (AD FS) server
configuration on EDGE1. AD FS is used to support single sign-on (SSO) with your Azure Active Directory
tenant. Although a detailed explanation of this process is outside of the scope of this document, the
important thing to know as an IT professional is that at no point in the process are user credentials for the
on-premises environment accessible to Azure Active Directory. Instead, authentication tokens with a limited
lifetime are used to represent the authenticated user. This is done using industry-standard processes and
protocols and ensures the integrity of on-premises credentials while still supporting single sign-on.
Note
2.075.
For a detailed explanation of the process, see the whitepaper OFFICE 365 SINGLE SIGN-ON
WITH
AD FS
To install and configure AD FS on EDGE1, proceed with the following steps:
1.
On EDGE1, back to the main menu of the script running in an elevated Windows PowerShell
command prompt, type “7” to select choice 7 in the menu when prompted Enter your selection.
Enter your selection: 7
------------------------------------------Add the ADFS role to this server
------------------------------------------Local Windows feature ADFS-Federation missing, installing…
WARNING: To finish configuring this server for the federation server role using Windows PowerShell, see
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=224868.
Complete. Press “Enter” to continue.
2.
75
Press ENTER to return to the main menu of the script. To create a service account in the local domain
corp-contoso.com for AD FS use, type “8” to select choice 8 in the menu when prompted Enter your
selection.
OFFICE 365 SINGLE SIGN-ON WITH AD FS 2.0: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=28971
56 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
When prompted, specify the domain name (FQDN or NetBIOS will work), the SAM account name,
and the password (with confirmation) for the new on-premises service account. The new account
will be created with the Password never expires flag set.
Enter your selection: 8
--------------------------------------------------------------------Create a service account in the local domain for ADFS use
--------------------------------------------------------------------Domain name for ADFS service account: corp-contoso.com
SAM account name for the ADFS service account: ADFSService
Password: **********
Confirm Password: **********
Attempting to load system module ActiveDirectory
Creating user “ADFSService”…
Creation successful.
Complete. Press “Enter” to continue.
3.
Press ENTER to return to the main menu of the script. To create an internal DNS entry for AD FS,
type “9” to select choice 9 in the menu when prompted Enter your selection.
When prompted, select the domain name to use for AD FS externally. This should match the UPN
suffix active in the Azure Rights Management service tenant. For example, corp-contoso.com in our
configuration. Select the 10.0.0.1 to point to the internal DNS on DC1.
Enter your selection: 9
-------------------------------------------------------Create an internal DNS entry for ADFS
-------------------------------------------------------Getting custom domain list…
Select a verified domain
0) NONE
1) corp-contoso.com
Domain to use: 1
Select a DNS server for the creation request
0) NONE
1) xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
2) 10.0.0.1
DNS server: 2
Local IP addresses
0) NONE
1) 10.0.0.1
2) xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx
Main ADFS service IP address: 1
Local Windows Feature RSAT-DNS-Server missing, installing…
Attempting to load system module DnsServer
Attempting to add DNS record…
Complete.
Complete. Press “Enter” to continue.
4.
Press ENTER to return to the main menu of the script. To create a new, self-signed SSL certificate for
AD FS, type “10” to select choice 10 in the menu when prompted Enter your selection.
57 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Note
We use a self-signed certificate here for demonstration purposes. However, in a production
environment, you would generally use a certificate issued by a public certificate authority (CA) such as VeriSign,
although if only internal domain-joined clients will be used to access services, then a private Enterprise CA would
be acceptable too. To reflect this, we could have leverage the Certificate Authority on SP1, but this would have
required to modify the script. We’ve not opted for this option.
Enter your selection: 10
------------------------------------------Process SSL certificate for ADFS
------------------------------------------Checking for existing certificate…
Getting custom domain list…
Select a verified domain
0) NONE
1) corp-contoso.com
Domain to use: 1
Confirm Self-Signed
Create self-signed certificate?
[Y] Yes [N] No [?] Help (default is “Y”):
Creating private key…
Creating certificate request details…
Creating certificate request…
Submitting request…
Installing response…
Importing as trusted root…
Importing as enterprise trust…
Importing as trusted third-party root…
Complete.
Complete. Press “Enter” to continue.
5.
Press ENTER to return to the main menu of the script. To export the newly created self-signed SSL
certificate for AD FS, type “11” to select choice 10 in the menu when prompted Enter your selection.
Enter your selection: 11
-------------------------------------------------Exporting SSL certificate with private key
-------------------------------------------------Exporting…
Getting custom domain list…
Select a verified domain
0) NONE
1) corp-contoso.com
Domain to use: 1
Complete.
Complete. Press “Enter” to continue.
The command creates the following two certificate files at the root of the C drive: ADFSSelfSigned.cer
and ADFSSelfSigned.pfx. We will use the former one later in this document.
6.
Press ENTER to return to the main menu. To configure ADFS with basic configuration of the script,
type “12” to select choice 12 in the menu when prompted Enter your selection.
58 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Note
For ease of configuration and implementation, AD FS on EDGE1 is left with its default of Windows
Integrated Authentication, but has NTLM prioritized over Negotiate in the provider list. This is not a default
configuration but avoids potential Kerberos issues. In production, you would likely leave the default to keep the
enhanced security offered by Kerberos.
Enter your selection: 12
-------------------------------------------------Configure ADFS with basic configuration
-------------------------------------------------Domain name for ADFS service account: corp-contoso.com
SAM account name for the ADFS service account: ADFSService
Password: **********
Confirm Password: **********
Attempting to load system module WebAdministration
Configuring ADFS to run as corp-contoso.com\ADFSservice
with certificate thumbprint C493A457C63846D8BE128F43D03BF3D62CEF3FD9 …
Message
Context
RebootRequired
Status
--------------------------------------Installation completed suc…
False
Success
True
Configuring Windows authentication provider in IIS…
Checking/configuring local registry to support loopback testing…
Changes made to system requirements require a reboot.
Script exiting.
7.
Reboot the EDGE1 machine and log on as the domain administrator CORP-CONTOSO\User1.
8.
Open an elevated Windows PowerShell command prompt, and, at the command prompt, run the
following command:
PS C:\Windows\system32>C:\Menu.ps1
9.
When prompted Enter your selection, type “13” to select choice 13 in the menu to
confirm/configure Windows Firewall for port 443.
Enter your selection: 13
--------------------------------------------------------Confirm/configure Windows Firewall for port 443
--------------------------------------------------------Attempting to load system module NetSecurity…
Windows Firewall appears open for TCP port 443, no changes made.
Complete. Press “Enter” to continue.
10. Start Internet Explorer and select Internet Options on the Tools menu. An Internet Options dialog
pops up.
11. Click the Security tab, select the Local intranet zone, and then click Sites. A Local intranet dialog
appears.
59 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
12. Click Advanced. A Trusted sites dialog appears.
13. In Add this website to the zone, type “https://adfs.corp-contoso.com”, and then click Add. You
should replace corp-contoso.com by your own domain as already mentioned.
14. Click Close, and then click OK.
15. Verify that the security level for the zone is set to the default setting of Medium-low which enables
Windows integrated authentication for Intranet zones.
16. Click OK to close the Internet Options dialog.
17. Back to the Windows PowerShell command prompt, press ENTER to return to the main menu of the
script. To launch test web pages, type “14” to select choice 14 in the menu when prompted Enter
your selection.
Enter your selection: 14
------------------------------Launch test web pages
------------------------------Attempting to load system module MSOnline
Checking for connection to Microsoft Online Services…
Getting credentials for connecting to Microsoft Online Services tenant.
Getting custom domain list…
Select a verified domain
0) NONE
1) corp-contoso.com
Domain to use: 1
60 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Page launch will take about 10 seconds…
Three Internet Explorer tabs are launched:

ADFS metadata exchange endpoint, which offers an XML service description: https://adfs.corpcontoso.com/adfs/services/trust/mex

AD
FS
federation
metadata:
06/FederationMetadata.xml

AD FS sign-in page: https://adfs.corp-contoso.com/adfs/ls/IdpInitiatedSignon.aspx
61 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
https://adfs.corp-contoso.com/FederationMetadata/2007-
Configuring Azure Active Directory Federation Support
To check DNS records for TXT entries for unverified domains, proceed with the following steps:
1.
Back to the main menu of the script on EDGE1, type “22” to select choice 22 in the menu when
prompted Enter your selection.
You are invited to specify the IP address of the FQDN of an external DNS server to query. You can
simply press ENTER to accept the default (209.244.0.3) or specify one of the name server of your
DNS zone.
62 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Note
In our illustration with GoDaddy.com, see the article FINDING YOUR HOSTING ACCOUNT'S NAME SERVERS76 to
determine the name servers. For our corp-contoso.com zone, the name servers are ns77.domaincontrol.com and
ns78.domaincontrol.com.
Enter your selection: 22
----------------------------------------------------------------------Check DNS records for the TXT entries for unverified domains
----------------------------------------------------------------------Enter the IP address for the external DNS server to query
Or hit Enter for the default of 209.244.0.3: ns77.domaincontrol.com
Checking for TXT for “corp-contoso.com”… Success.
Record found: “MS=ms78729055”
Validating record… Success.
Record located matched expected record.
Completed. Press “Enter” to continue.
2.
Press ENTER to return to the main menu of the script. To configure Azure Active Directory
connection to AD FS, type “23” to select choice 23 in the menu when prompted Enter your
selection.
Enter your selection: 23
---------------------------------------------------------Configure Windows Azure AD connection for ADFS
---------------------------------------------------------Getting custom domain list…
Select a verified domain
0) NONE
1) corp-contoso.com
Domain to use: 1
Configuring the Windows Azure AD connection to ADFS…
Finished.
76
FINDING YOUR HOSTING ACCOUNT'S NAME SERVERS: http://support.godaddy.com/help/article/6795
63 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Completed. Press “Enter” to continue.
3.
Press ENTER to return to the main menu of the script. To create a single sign-on test user, type “24”
to select choice 24 in the menu when prompted Enter your selection.
Enter your selection: 24
----------------------------------Create sign-in test user
----------------------------------SAM account name for Test user: JohnDoe
Password: *********
Confirm password: *********
First (given) name of new user: John
Last (family) name of new user: Doe
Getting custom domain list…
Select a verified domain
0) NONE
1) corp-contoso.com
Domain to use: 1
Attempting to load system module ActiveDirectory
Creating user “JohnDoe”…
Creating corresponding Windows Azure Active Directory user…
Completed. Press “Enter” to continue.
4.
Open a browser session and
https://portal.microsoftonline.com.
5.
navigate
to
the
Microsoft
Online
Portal
at
Log on as the newly created sign-in test user. You should be automatically redirected to the onpremises AD FS server, transparently authenticated thanks to the Windows integrated
authentication and then redirected back to the portal. At the end of the process, you should have
a seamless access to the sign-in test user settings in Office 365. This is expected for the test user
as in fact you have not assigned a license to the test user.
64 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Installing and configuring DirSync on EDGE1
This final step enables to configure and activate Directory Synchronization (DirSync). DirSync is a custom,
specialized implementation of Microsoft Forefront Identity Manager (FIM) that is configured to synchronize
accounts between your on-premises domain corp-contoso.com and a corresponding Azure Active Directory
domain.
On EDGE1, proceed with the following steps:
1.
Back to the main menu of the script, to download and install the DirSync tool, type “25” to select
choice 25 in the menu when prompted Enter your selection.
This will take some time; the download is approximately 180 MB, and when installing, it will install a
local SQL Server Express instance to support the synchronization. The installation for the most part
will be invisible as it runs.
Enter your selection: 25
----------------------------------------------------------Download, install, and configure the DirSync tool
----------------------------------------------------------Downloading C:\\DirSync.exe
from http://g.microsoftonline.com/0BX10en/571
please wait…
Running DirSync installer…
You must sign out and sign in again to continue.
Script exiting.
2.
Log off and log on again as the domain administrator CORP-CONTOSO\User1.
3.
Double click the shortcut Windows Azure Directory Module for Windows PowerShell on the
desktop. A Windows PowerShell command prompt opens. At the command prompt, run the
following command to connect to your tenant:
PS C:\Users\user1\Desktop>Connect-MsolService
65 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
You will then be prompted for your credentials.
4.
Enter your Azure Active Directory/Office 365 Enterprise credentials (the set of credentials should
have Global Administrator privilege) and wait to be authenticated. In the Windows PowerShell
Credential Request window that opens up, provide the credentials for the Office 365 Enterprise
global administrator account such as:
Username: [email protected]
Password: ****************
5.
Run the following command to create an account with administrative privileges:
Important note
This account will be used as the ongoing synchronization account and must not be
configured in the synchronized corp-contoso.com domain – our default domain demorms.onmicrosoft.com for the
Azure Rights Management service tenant represents a good choice -, and must be set to not have its password
expire.
PS C:\Users\user1\Desktop>$user = New-MsolUser –DisplayName “DirSync Agent” –UserPrincipalName
[email protected] –FirstName “DirSync” –LastName “Agent” –AlternateEmailAddresses
[email protected] –Password [email protected] –PasswordNeverExpires $true –ForceChangePassword $false
PS C:\Users\user1\Desktop>Add-MsolRoleMember –RoleName “Company Administrator” –RoleMemberObjectId $user.ObjectId
6.
Close the Windows PowerShell command prompt.
7.
Now open an elevated Windows PowerShell command prompt, and, at the command prompt, run
the following command:
PS C:\Windows\system32>C:\Menu.ps1
8.
When prompted Enter your selection, type “26” to select choice 26 in the menu to configure the
DirSync tool.
Enter your selection: 26
------------------------------------------Configure the DirSync tool
------------------------------------------Attempting to load system module MSonline
Checking for connection to Microsoft Online Services…
Getting credentials for connecting to Microsoft online Services tenant.
Requesting synchronization credentials…
Requesting local credentials…
Requesting online coexistence configuration information…
Configuring local coexistence configuration information…
The configuration was set successfully.
Requesting an immediate synchronization…
Completed. Press “Enter” to continue.
66 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
9.
Press ENTER to return to the main menu of the script. To get the latest directory synchronization
events (event in the past thirty minutes), type “27” to select choice 27 in the menu when prompted
Enter your selection.
10. Open a browser session and navigate to the Microsoft Online Portal at
https://portal.microsoftonline.com. provide the credentials for the Office 365 Enterprise global
administrator account such as:
Username: [email protected]
Password: ****************
11. In the left-side navigation area of the Office 365 admin center, under dashboard, select users and
groups.
12. Click active users and confirm that Chris Ashton and Janet Schorr are listed under DISPLAY NAME
and that their STATUS is marked as Synced with Active Directory.
You are now in a position to install and configure the Rights Management connector on your test lab
environment.
You can use the Directory Synchronization Windows PowerShell cmdlet to force synchronization. The cmdlet
is installed when you install the Directory Sync tool. To force the directory synchronization, proceed with the
following steps:
1.
On EDGE1, navigate to the directory synchronization installation folder located here:
%ProgramFiles%\Windows Azure Active Directory Sync.
2.
Double-click DirSyncConfigShell.psc1 to open a Windows PowerShell window with the cmdlets
loaded.
3.
In the Windows PowerShell command prompt, run the following command:
67 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
PS C:\Program Files\Windows Azure Active Directory Sync> Start-OnlineCoexistenceSync
Installing and configuring the Rights Management connector
The following five main steps must be followed in order to install and configure the Rights Management
connector:
1.
Setting up the Rights Management connector on EDGE1.
2.
Authorizing the EX1 Exchange server to the Rights Management connector on EDGE1.
Authorizing the SP1 SharePoint server to use the Rights Management
connector on EDGE1
To authorize the SP1 SharePoint server to use the Rights Management connector, proceed with the following
steps:
1.
On DC1, log on as the domain administrator CORP-CONTOSO\User1.
2.
Launch Server Manager.
3.
Click Tools and then Active Directory Users and Computers. The Active Directory Users and
Computers MMC snap-in appears.
4.
Right-click corp-contoso.com, select New, and then select Organizational Unit. A New Object –
Organizational Unit dialog appears.
5.
Type “Microsoft SharePoint Security Groups” and click OK.
6.
Right-click the newly created OU, select New, and then select Group. A New Object –
Organizational Unit dialog appears.
68 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
7.
Type “SharePoint Servers” in Group name and click OK.
8.
Right-click the newly created group and select Properties. A Properties dialog appears.
9.
Select the Members tab.
10. Click Add… A Select Users, Contacts, Computers, Services Accounts, or … dialog appears.
11. Type “SPFarmAdmin; SQL Server Database Engine” in Enter the object name to select (examples):
and click Check Names. The names should correctly resolve,
12. Click OK twice.
13. Close the MMC snap-in.
14. On SP1, log on as the domain administrator CORP-CONTOSO\User1 and restart the machine.
15. On EDGE1, log on as the domain administrator CORP-CONTOSO\User1.
16. Double-click the Microsoft RMS connector administration tool shortcut on the desktop. The
Rights Management connector administration tool dialog opens up.
69 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
17. Enter your Azure Active Directory/Office 365 Enterprise credentials (the set of credentials should
have Global Administrator privilege) and click Sign in. Provide the credentials for the Office 365
Enterprise global administrator account such as:
Username: [email protected]
Password: ****************
18. Click Add. An Allow a server to utilize the connector dialog appears.
70 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
19. Scroll down the Role combo box and select SharePoint Server.
20. Click Browse…. A Select User, Computer, Service Account, or Group dialog appears.
21. Type “SharePoint Servers” in Enter the object name to select (examples):, click Check Names. The
name should resolve. Click OK. This closes the dialog.
22. Click OK.
71 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
23. Click Close.
3.
Configuring Exchange Server 2013 .
4.
Authorizing the EX1 SharePoint server to the Rights Management connector on EDGE1.
72 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Configuring SharePoint Server 2013 to use the Rights
Management connector
5.
.
Setting up the Rights Management connector on EDGE1
Unless otherwise indicated, all the instructions below should be done on the EDGE 1 machine.
Configuring the Rights Management connector on EDGE1
To configure the Rights Management connector on EDGE1, proceed with the following steps:
1. Whilst still being logged as CORP-CONTOSO\User1 on EDGE1, double click the shortcut Windows
Azure Directory Module for Windows PowerShell on the desktop. A Windows PowerShell
command prompt opens. At the command prompt, run the following command to connect to your
tenant:
PS C:\Users\user1\Desktop>Connect-MsolService
You will then be prompted for your credentials.
2. Enter your Azure Active Directory/Office 365 Enterprise credentials (the set of credentials should
have Global Administrator privilege) and wait to be authenticated. In the Windows PowerShell
Credential Request window that opens up, provide the credentials for the Office 365 Enterprise
global administrator account such as:
Username: [email protected]
Password: ****************
3. Run the following command to create an account with administrative privileges for the Rights
Management connector:
PS C:\Users\user1\Desktop>$user = New-MsolUser –DisplayName “RMS Connector Agent” –UserPrincipalName
[email protected] –FirstName “RMSConnector” –LastName “Agent” –AlternateEmailAddresses
[email protected] –Password [email protected] –PasswordNeverExpires $true –ForceChangePassword $false
PS C:\Users\user1\Desktop>Add-MsolRoleMember –RoleName “Company Administrator” –RoleMemberObjectId $user.ObjectId
4. Close the Windows PowerShell command prompt.
73 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
5. Follow the installation step described in Section § INSTALLING THE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT CONNECTOR
earlier in this document.
6. In the page, ensure that Launch connector administration console to authorize servers is
checked and click Finish. The Rights Management connector administration tool opens up.
Installing the Microsoft Rights Management administration module for Windows
PowerShell on EDGE1
As previously outlined, the Microsoft Rights Management administration module provides a set of Windows
PowerShell cmdlets that provide administrative (advanced) capabilities for the Azure Rights Management
service.
74 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
To connect Windows PowerShell to the Azure Rights Management service, proceed with the following
steps:
1.
Download
the
Microsoft
Rights
Management
(WindowsAzureADRightsManagementAdministration.msi)
http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=314106.
Administration
Tool
from
Important note
Unlike the administration package available in the link Windows Azure AD Rights
Management administration module for Windows PowerShell77, this new version of the package not only enables
to configure the Azure Rights Management service tenant and manage usage logging, but also enable to configure
and manage the Rights Management connector, which allows Exchange and SharePoint Server to use the Azure
Rights Management service.
77
2.
Double-click the file WindowsAzureADRightsManagementAdministration.msi. A Microsoft Rights
Management Administration Setup wizard opens up.
1.
On the Welcome page, select the Next option.
2.
On the End-User License Agreement page, select I accept the terms in the License Agreement
and click Next.
Microsoft Rights Management administration module for Windows PowerShell: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=257721
75 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
3.
On the Ready to Install page, click Install. An User Account Control dialog pops up.
3.
Click Yes.
4.
On the completion page, click Finish.
The cmdlets of the Microsoft Rights Management administration module for Windows PowerShell will be
used later in this document with for getting the current configuration of the Azure Rights Management
service.
Connecting Windows PowerShell to the Azure Rights Management service
To connect Windows PowerShell to the Azure Rights Management service, proceed with the following steps:
1.
Open an elevated Windows PowerShell command prompt.
2.
Then import the module and connect to the Azure Rights Management service for your Office 365
Enterprise tenant by typing the following commands:
76 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
PS C:\Windows\system32> Import-Module AADRM
PS C:\Windows\system32> Connect-AadrmService –Verbose
You will be prompted for your credentials.
3.
Enter your Office 365 Enterprise credentials (the set of credentials should have Global Administrator
privilege) and wait to be authenticated. In the Windows PowerShell Credential Request window
that opens up, provide the credentials for the Office 365 Enterprise global administrator account
such as:
Username: [email protected]
Password: ****************
Note
By default, global administrators are able connect to the Azure Rights Management service.
PS C:\Windows\system32> Connect-AadrmService –Verbose
In the step 2, you can also create a PSCredential object by using a script or by using the GetCredential cmdlet. You can then set the Credential parameter to the PSCredential object.
The following example shows how to create credentials.
PS C:\Windows\system32> $Cred = Get-Credential [email protected]
The following shows how to set the Credential parameter to these credentials.
PS C:\Windows\system32> Connect-AadrmService –Verbose -Credential $Cred
If the acting credentials do not have tenant-level permission to perform the task, the Azure Rights
Management service returns a terminating error.
77 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Once connected, the Microsoft Rights Management administration module provides a set of Windows
PowerShell cmdlets that provide administrative (advanced) capabilities for the Azure Rights Management
service as illustrated hereafter.
Note
For additional information, see the online help topics ADMINISTERING RIGHTS MANAGEMENT78 and KNOWN
ISSUES FOR WINDOWS AZURE AD RIGHTS MANAGEMENT79.
Authorizing the EX1 Exchange server to use the connector on EDGE1
To authorize the EX1 Exchange server to use the Rights Management connector, proceed with the following
steps:
1. Whilst still being connected as CORP-CONTOSO\User1 on EDGE1 with the Rights Management
connector administration tool dialog opened from the previous step, click Add.
2. Scroll down the Role combo box and select Exchange Server.
78
ADMINISTERING RIGHTS MANAGEMENT: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj585027.aspx
79
KNOWN ISSUES FOR WINDOWS AZURE AD RIGHTS MANAGEMENT: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj585023
78 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
3. Click Browse…. A Select User, Computer, Service Account, or Group dialog appears.
4. Type “Exchange Servers” in Enter the object name to select (examples):, click Check Names, The
name should resolve. Click OK. This closes the dialog.
5. Click OK.
Authorizing the SP1 SharePoint server to use the Rights Management
connector on EDGE1
To authorize the SP1 SharePoint server to use the Rights Management connector, proceed with the following
steps:
24. On DC1, log on as the domain administrator CORP-CONTOSO\User1.
25. Launch Server Manager.
26. Click Tools and then Active Directory Users and Computers. The Active Directory Users and
Computers MMC snap-in appears.
27. Right-click corp-contoso.com, select New, and then select Organizational Unit. A New Object –
Organizational Unit dialog appears.
28. Type “Microsoft SharePoint Security Groups” and click OK.
29. Right-click the newly created OU, select New, and then select Group. A New Object –
Organizational Unit dialog appears.
79 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
30. Type “SharePoint Servers” in Group name and click OK.
31. Right-click the newly created group and select Properties. A Properties dialog appears.
32. Select the Members tab.
33. Click Add… A Select Users, Contacts, Computers, Services Accounts, or … dialog appears.
34. Type “SPFarmAdmin; SQL Server Database Engine” in Enter the object name to select (examples):
and click Check Names. The names should correctly resolve,
35. Click OK twice.
36. Close the MMC snap-in.
37. On SP1, log on as the domain administrator CORP-CONTOSO\User1 and restart the machine.
38. On EDGE1, log on as the domain administrator CORP-CONTOSO\User1.
39. Double-click the Microsoft RMS connector administration tool shortcut on the desktop. The
Rights Management connector administration tool dialog opens up.
80 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
40. Enter your Azure Active Directory/Office 365 Enterprise credentials (the set of credentials should
have Global Administrator privilege) and click Sign in. Provide the credentials for the Office 365
Enterprise global administrator account such as:
Username: [email protected]
Password: ****************
41. Click Add. An Allow a server to utilize the connector dialog appears.
81 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
42. Scroll down the Role combo box and select SharePoint Server.
43. Click Browse…. A Select User, Computer, Service Account, or Group dialog appears.
44. Type “SharePoint Servers” in Enter the object name to select (examples):, click Check Names. The
name should resolve. Click OK. This closes the dialog.
45. Click OK.
82 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
46. Click Close.
Configuring Exchange Server 2013 to use the Rights
Management connector
As previously mentioned, the Exchange 2013 Cumulative Update 3 (CU3) constitutes a prerequisite for
Exchange Server 2013 to work with the Rights Management connector.
Setting the Windows PowerShell execution policy
To prevent installation issues with the Exchange 2013 Cumulative Update 3 (CU3), you should ensure that
the Windows PowerShell Script execution policy is set to Unrestricted on the EX1 machine.
Note
For more information, see the Microsoft TechNet article RUNNING SCRIPTS80.
To verify the policy settings on EX1, proceed with the following steps:
1.
Open an elevated Windows PowerShell command prompt and run the following command:
PS C:\Windows\system32> Get-ExecutionPolicy
RemoteSigned
PS C:\Windows\system32>
2.
If the policies are NOT set to Unrestricted you should use the resolution steps in article 98147481
YOU RECEIVE ERROR 1603 WHEN YOU TRY TO INSTALL THE EXCHANGE SERVER 2010 RU1 to adjust the settings.
Installing the Exchange 2013 Cumulative Update 3 (CU3)
To apply the Exchange 2013 CU3, proceed with the following steps:
1.
Open a browsing session and navigate to the page CUMULATIVE UPDATE 3 FOR EXCHANGE SERVER 2013
(KB2892464) on the Microsoft Download Center82.
80
RUNNING SCRIPTS: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb613481.aspx
81
981474 YOU RECEIVE ERROR 1603 WHEN YOU TRY TO INSTALL THE EXCHANGE SERVER 2010 RU1: http://support.microsoft.com/kb/981474
82
Cumulative Update 3 for Exchange Server 2013 (KB2892464): http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=41175
83 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
2.
Click Download on this page to start the download.
3.
Click Run to execute the program (Exchange2013-x64-cu3.exe) once downloaded.
4.
Once downloaded, the executable archive file is verified and a Choose Directory For Extracted
Files dialog appears.
5.
Replace the C:\ path by typing “C:\CU3” instead and click Ok. The files of the Exchange 2013 CU3
are then extracted from the executable archive. Once the extraction completed, an Extraction
Complete dialog opens up.
6.
Click OK and navigate to the C:\CU3 folder, right-click the setup.exe and select Run as
administrator. An User Account Control dialog pops up.
7.
Click Yes. A MICROSOFT EXCHANGE SERVER 2012 CUMULATIVE UPDATE 3 SETUP appears.
84 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
8.
Since EX1 doesn’t have an Internet connectivity, select Don’t check for updates right now. This
isn’t recommend for production environment. Click Next.
9.
The various files are copied and the setup initializes.
10. In the Upgrade page, click Next.
85 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
11. In the Licenses Agreement page, click I accept the terms in the license agreement, and then click
Next.
12. Click Install.
13. Do no pay attention to the warning since EX1 doesn’t have Internet connectivity. Click Install. Once
completed the 17 steps required for applying the CU3, the Setup Completed page appears.
86 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
14. Click Finish.
15. Restart EX1 to complete the setup.
Enabling IRM capabilities on Exchange Server
Getting the URLs of the Azure Rights Management service
To get the URLs of the Azure Rights Management service, proceed with the following steps:
1. On EDGE1, log on as the domain administrator CORP-CONTOSO\User1.
2. Connecting Windows PowerShell to Azure Rights Management service as per Section § CONNECTING
WINDOWS POWERSHELL TO THE AZURE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT SERVICE earlier in this document.
3. View the current configuration for the tenant by running Get-AadrmConfiguration cmdlet:
PS C:\Windows\system32> Get-AadrmConfiguration
87 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
PS C:\Windows\system32> Get-AadrmConfiguration
BPOSId
RightsManagementServiceId
: ddfe7f3c-34a2-40c9-a84b-3e2576d6aa94
: 3599e415-dcde-4c14-ba31-765d543c5f25
LicensingIntranetDistributionPointUrl
: https://3599e415-dcde-4c14-ba31-765d543c5f25.rms.eu.aadrm.com/_wmcs/licensing
LicensingExtranetDistributionPointUrl
: https://3599e415-dcde-4c14-ba31-765d543c5f25.rms.eu.aadrm.com/_wmcs/licensing
CertificationIntranetDistributionPointUrl : https://3599e415-dcde-4c14-ba31-765d543c5f25.rms.eu.aadrm.com/
_wmcs/certification
CertificationExtranetDistributionPointUrl : https://3599e415-dcde-4c14-ba31-765d543c5f25.rms.eu.aadrm.com/
_wmcs/certification
AdminConnectionUrl
OnPremiseDomainName
Keys
CurrentLicensorCertificateGuid
Templates
FunctionalState
SuperUsersEnabled
SuperUsers
AdminRoleMembers
KeyRolloverCount
ProvisioningDate
IPCv3ServiceFunctionalSate
DevicePlatformState
: https://admin.eu.aadrm.com/admin/admin.svc/Tenants/3599e415dcde-4c14-ba31-765d543c5f25
:
: {3a1d0071-ffbd-4c46-acbc-90dc7f6f88a0}
: 3a1d0071-ffbd-4c46-acbc-90dc7f6f88a0
: {a2f21116-8dad-4e7f-9982-a9950e51a72b, 05e6bd8d-f797-40c1-b5dd-f8f1856b033a}
: Enabled
: Enabled
: [email protected]-4c14-ba31-765d543c5f25.rms.eu.aadrm.com}
: {}
: 0
: 8/1/2013 5:07:39 PM
: Enabled
: {Windows -> True, WindowsStore -> True, WindowsPhone -> True,
Mac -> True…}
Considering the above output, our organization’s Azure Rights Management service URL is in our
configuration 3599e415-dcde-4c14-ba31-765d543c5f25.rms.eu.aadrm.com. This value will
serve for the configuration of the registry settings on EX1 to configure Exchange to use the Azure
Rights Management service, but redirect it to talk through the Rights Management connector
whenever is has to communicate with the Azure Rights Management service.
As already outlined, and beyond the GUID that relates to our tenant, for regions outside the
European Union, .eu. will be replaced in the above Urls by .na. for North America, or .ap. for Asia.
4. Close the connection with the Azure Rights Management service.
88 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
PS C:\Windows\system32> Disconnect-AadrmService
5. Close the Windows PowerShell command prompt.
Setting URLs manually in the EX1 Registry
Considering both our Azure Rights Management service configuration and the current setup of the Rights
Management connector on EDGE1, the following registry setting must be set on EX1 to configure Exchange
Server to use the Azure Rights Management service, but redirect it to talk through the Rights Management
connector whenever is has to communicate with the Azure Rights Management service:
HKLM\Software\Microsoft\MSDRM\ServiceLocation\Activation
REG_SZ: Default = "https://3599e415-dcde-4c14-ba31-765d543c5f25.rms.eu.aadrm.com/_wmcs/certification"
HKLM\Software\Microsoft\MSDRM\ServiceLocation\EnterprisePublishing
REG_SZ: Default = "https://3599e415-dcde-4c14-ba31-765d543c5f25.rms.eu.aadrm.com/_wmcs/Licensing"
HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\ExchangeServer\v15\IRM\CertificationServerRedirection
REG_SZ:"https://3599e415-dcde-4c14-ba31-765d543c5f25.rms.eu.aadrm.com/_wmcs/certification" = "http://edge1.corpcontoso.com/_wmcs/certification"
HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\ExchangeServer\v15\IRM\LicenseServerRedirection
REG_SZ: "https://3599e415-dcde-4c14-ba31-765d543c5f25.rms.eu.aadrm.com/_wmcs/licensing" = "http://edge1.corpcontoso.com/_wmcs/licensing"
To set these registry settings, proceed with the following steps:
1.
On EX1, open an elevated Windows PowerShell command prompt, and, at the command prompt,
run the following command to create the first registry value:
PS C:\Windows\system32>REG ADD HKLM\Software\Microsoft\MSDRM\ServiceLocation\Activation /t Reg_SZ /d "https://3599e415dcde-4c14-ba31-765d543c5f25.rms.eu.aadrm.com/_wmcs/certification"
The operation completed successfully.
PS C:\Windows\system32>
2.
Run the following command to create the second one:
PS C:\Windows\system32>REG ADD HKLM\Software\Microsoft\MSDRM\ServiceLocation\EnterprisePublishing /t Reg_SZ /d
"https://3599e415-dcde-4c14-ba31-765d543c5f25.rms.eu.aadrm.com/_wmcs/Licensing"
The operation completed successfully.
PS C:\Windows\system32>
3.
Run the following command to create the third one:
PS C:\Windows\system32>REG ADD HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\ExchangeServer\v15\IRM\CertificationServerRedirection /v
https://3599e415-dcde-4c14-ba31-765d543c5f25.rms.eu.aadrm.com/_wmcs/certification /d "http://edge1.corpcontoso.com/_wmcs/certification"
The operation completed successfully.
PS C:\Windows\system32>
4.
Run the following command to create the fourth one:
PS C:\Windows\system32>REG ADD HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\ExchangeServer\v15\IRM\LicenseServerRedirection /v
https://3599e415-dcde-4c14-ba31-765d543c5f25.rms.eu.aadrm.com/_wmcs/licensing /d "http://edge1.corpcontoso.com/_wmcs/licensing"
The operation completed successfully.
PS C:\Windows\system32>
89 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
5.
Close the Windows PowerShell command prompt.
The RMS connector server configuration can ease the configuration of the above settings.
Setting URLs in the EX1 Registry with the RMS connector server configuration tool
To set the registry settings with the RMS connector Configuration tool, proceed with the following steps:
1.
On EX1, open an elevated Windows PowerShell command prompt, and, navigate to the folder where
the RMS Connector configuration tool has been download, for example “C:\RMS connector server
configuration tool” in our configuration.
2.
Run the following command to set the Exchange Server 2013 configuration:
PS C:\RMS connector server configuration tool> .\GenConnectorConfig.ps1 –ConnectorUri http://edge1-corp-contoso.com –
SetExchange2013
PS C:\RMS connector server configuration tool>
3.
Close the Windows PowerShell command prompt.
Enabling IRM capabilities on EX1
To test the IRM configuration, proceed with the following command:
1.
From the Start screen, click Exchange Management Shell. An eponym Exchange Management
Shell command prompt appears.
2.
When the prompt [PS] C:\Windows\system32> appears, run the following command:
PS C:\Windows\system32> Set-IRMConfiguration –InternalLicensingEnabled $true
With this configuration change (which is immediate) users should then be able to use the rights
policy templates from any Rights Management client.
3.
Optionally, test the configuration using the following command:
PS C:\Windows\system32> Test-IRMConfiguration –sender [email protected]
Once IRM enabled, the related Xrml licenses and certificated are located under C:\Users\All
Users\Microsoft\DRM\Server\S-1-5-18\.
The IRM logs are enabled by default on Exchange Server 2013. The related files are located under
%ExchangeInstallPath%Logging\IRMLogs.
90 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Testing IRM capabilities on EX1
Configuring transport rules
In Exchange Server 2013, transport rules provide some mail flow control capabilities for administrators. The
basic goal, when creating a transport rule, is to have Exchange Server inspect e-mail messages sent to and
received by the users of the tenant and process actions against that e-mail message based on conditions.
These rules can help administrators mitigate security and compliance risks in their organization. For example,
transport rules are commonly used by administrators in order to apply a legal disclaimer on each e-mail
message leaving their organization.
Transport rules use a set of conditions, actions, and exceptions:

Conditions identify specific criteria such as sender, receiver and keywords within an e-mail message
and determines why the rule is triggered;

Actions are applied to e-mail messages that match these conditions;

Exceptions identify e-mail messages to which a transport rule action shouldn't be applied, even if
the message matches a transport rule condition.
Along with the standard list of conditions that can be applied to all rules, administrators can set up transport
rules that automatically apply IRM-protection to e-mail messages in transit (including Microsoft Office Word,
Excel, PowerPoint, and XPS attachments).
For example, you can create a transport rule that automatically protects any e-mail message sent to the
"Legal Department” (represented by a distribution group - DG) in you organization, with a "Company Confidential View Only" rights policy. With such a configuration any message sent to a member of the "Legal
Department” group, will be automatically protected by Exchange Server 2013 with the "Company Confidential View Only" rights policy template. When such a template will be applied, the e-mail message
could not be replied to, forwarded, or copied when it is received by a member of the distribution group.
Information workers exchange sensitive information such as financial reports and data, customer and
employee information, and confidential product information and specifications, by e-mail every day. Users
can protect e-mail messages content in Outlook 2013 or in Outlook Web App (OWA) by applying a rights
policy template.
However, when left to the discretion of users, e-mail messages may be sent in clear text without applying
any IRM protection. Transport rules can help protect against information leakage by having tenant
administrators defining IRM-protection enforcement based on a set of conditions. Outlook protection rules
represent another way to help protect against this type of information leakage.
To create a transport rule to help protect against information leakage, proceed with the following steps on
EX1:
1.
From a Web browser, open the Exchange Administration Center (EAC) at https://ex1/ecp/.
2.
Sign in as CORP-CONTOSO\User1. Click sign in.
91 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
3.
Select mail flow in the left pane and click rules.
4.
Click + and Create a new rule… to create a new rule. You can alternatively select in our context
Apply rights protection to messages…
A new rule dialog appears.
92 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
5.
In *Apply this rule if…, select The recipient... and then is this person. A Select Members Web
dialog appears.
6.
Select Chris Ashton, and then click add- >, and then ok.
93 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
7.
In *Do the following…, click Select one… A select RMS template dialog appears.
8.
Select the RMS template that will be applied as part of this new transport rule (, and then click ok.
You can select for example the “Company – Confidential View Only” template, “Demorms –
Confidential View Only” in our Azure Rights Management service tenant.
9.
Click save.
When the transport rule is in place, users of the given selection (in our example: Chris Ashton (CORPCONTOSO\Chris)) are getting all their messages enforced by an IRM-Protection policy template. The IRM
template itself will define which persistent protection will be applied to the messages and will define whether
they could viewed, copied, forwarded, printed, etc.
Configuring Data Loss Prevention (DLP) policies
Leakage or loss of data through email represents a growing risk and concern for many organizations today
– because of regulations, breaches of trust or loss of business critical information.
In such a context, organizations must ensure that data is properly handled during regular business processes,
preventing inappropriate access or sharing. They must consequently must organize their content and classify
it to assign retention and access controls as part of their compliance practice. Current classification systems
place enormous responsibility on the user and can interfere with their ability to complete their job.
Exchange Server 2013 approach to the problem is different and provides a range controls that can detect
sensitive data in email before it is sent and automatically block, hold, notify the sender or apply usage rights
restriction. This corresponds to the Data Loss Prevention (DLP) feature which is the ability to identify,
monitor, and protect sensitive data through deep content analysis.
94 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
DLP can help organizations reduce unintentional disclosure of sensitive data. It is designed to help
organizations meet specific regulations or security objectives by finding and protecting sensitive data. DLP
content holds data type definitions to locate regulatory and/or sensitive content, and defines the policy
objectives to meet regulatory controls for identified content. The actual classification of documents in DLP
is achieved through content analysis.
Transport rules covered in the previous section have been updated in Exchange Server 2013 to support
creating rules that accompany and enforce DLP policies. In fact, DLP policies define the different types of
projects through the organization.
Built-in templates for a DLP policy based on regulatory standards such as Personally Identifiable Information
(PII) and Payment Card Industry Data Security Standard (PCI-DSS)83 are offered as illustrated hereafter:
This set of DLP policies is extensible to support other policies important to your business. Corporate
administrators can easily create DLP policies in the Exchange Administration Center. For example, a DLP
policy built for a financial institution would take action on email that includes credit card information.
Fundamentally a DLP policy is an .xml document (can think of it as a block of configuration) that will
determine what content it should be detecting and what is the response (action) when that content is
detected.
83
PCI Data Security Standards: http://www.pcicomplianceguide.org/
95 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
A DLP policy can include rules, actions, and exceptions, and uses the full power of Exchange Server transport
rules.
Upon identifying sensitive information, DLP can automatically take action such as applying IRM protection,
appending a disclaimer, generating an audit log, sending the message for moderation, or preventing a
message from being sent.
The latest release of Exchange Server 2013 Service Pack 1 (SP1) adds Document Fingerprinting, which helps
you detect sensitive information in standard forms that are used throughout the organization.
Note
For more information about document fingerprinting, see the Microsoft TechNet article DOCUMENT
FINGERPRINTING84.
Document Fingerprinting is a DLP feature that converts a standard form into a sensitive information type,
which you can use to define transport rules and DLP policies. For example, you can create a document
fingerprint based on a blank patent template and then create a DLP policy that detects and blocks all
outgoing patent templates with sensitive content filled in.
As far as the forms are concerned, Document Fingerprinting supports the same file types as the ones that
are supported in transport rules.
Note
For more information about the supported file types, see the Microsoft TechNet article
THAT ARE SUPPORTED IN TRANSPORT RULES85.
SAME FILE TYPES
DLP works with a new feature called Policy Tips that informs users of a potential policy violation before it
occurs. Policy Tips help educate users about what sensitive data has been found in the email and can educate
them about related company policies. This ongoing education helps users manage data appropriately and
avoid sending sensitive data to unauthorized users.
Note
For more information, see the online help article POLICY TIPS86.
To create a custom DLP policy from scratch, proceed with the following steps:
1.
In the Exchange Administration Center (EAC), navigate to compliance management and click data
loss prevention.
84
DOCUMENT FINGERPRINTING: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/dn635176(v=exchg.150).aspx
85
SAME FILE TYPES THAT ARE SUPPORTED IN TRANSPORT RULES:
86
Policy Tips: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj150512(v=exchg.150).aspx
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj919236(v=exchg.150).aspx
96 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
2.
Click the arrow that is beside the + icon, and select New custom DLP policy.
If you click + instead of the arrow, you will create a new policy based on a DLP policy template (as
illustrated above).
3.
On the New custom DLP policy page, complete the following fields:
97 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
a.
Name: add a name that will distinguish this custom DLP policy from others, for example
“Company Confidential DLP Policy”. This field is required.
b.
Description: add an optional description that summarizes this custom DLP policy. This field is
optional.
c.
Choose a mode for the requirements in this DLP policy: select the mode for this custom DLP
policy, for example Test DLP Policy without Policy Tips. The new DLP policy is not fully
enabled until you specify that it should be. The default mode for a policy is test without
notifications.
4.
Click save to finish creating the new DLP policy reference information. The DLP policy is added to
the list of all DLP policies that you have configured, although there are not yet any rules or actions
associated with this new custom policy.
5.
Double-click the DLP policy that you just created. An edit DLP policy dialog appears.
6.
On the Company Confidential DLP Policy page, click rules on the left end side.
98 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
7.
Click + and Create a new rule to add a new blank rule.
A New Rule dialog appears. You can establish conditions using all the traditional transport rules in
addition to the sensitive information types defined in Exchange Online.
8.
In the Name field, give the new rule a name. In order to avoid confusion, supply a unique name for
each part of your DLP policy or rule.
99 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
9.
In *Apply this rule if…, select The recipient is... A Select Members Web dialog appears. In that
dialog box, select a user or a distribution group, then click add- >, and then ok.
10. Click More options to add additional conditions and actions for this rule including time-bound
limits of enforcement or effects on other rules in this policy.
11. In *Do the following…, select Secure the message with... and rights protection. This
automatically applies IRM protection and gives the option of the rights policy templates. A select
RMS template dialog appears.
12. Select the RMS template that will be applied as part of this new transport rule, and then click ok.
You can select for example the “Company – Confidential View Only” template, “Demorms –
Confidential View Only” in our tenant.
13. Click Save to finish modifying the policy and save your changes.
14. Click ok.
15. Back to the edit DLP policy dialog, click save.
100 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
As shortly illustrated, the new DLP technology is a sophisticated system built into Exchange Server 2013 for
helping users work with sensitive data safely and efficiently. It provides a rich framework on the kinds of
policies you can construct for your organization.
Note
For more information, see the online help topic DATA LOSS PREVENTION87.
The DLP technology is part of the compliance management features provided Exchange Server 2013. In
terms of compliancy, we would like to take this paper to shortly describe the InPlace eDiscovery & Hold
feature.
Note
For more information, see the online help topic MESSAGING POLICY AND COMPLIANCE88.
Leveraging the InPlace eDiscovery & Hold feature
With the explosive growth compliance requirements both inside and outside organizations, compliance has
become everyone’s responsibility. Neither the IT department nor the legal and compliance departments can
keep tabs on all of the information that is exchanged in the ordinary course of business. Organizations need
tools that enable self-service and automated compliance wherever possible. Enabling legal teams to search,
hold and export the right information without intervention from IT is cost saving for the organization.
This is the role devoted to E-discovery:
“E-discovery is the identification, preservation, collection, preparation, review and production of electronically
stored information associated with legal and government proceedings”
GARTNER SAYS E-DISCOVERY SOFTWARE MARKETPLACE IS SET TO CONTINUE HIGH-GROWTH PACE89
Exchange Server 2013 is built with an integrated E-discovery solution, through the InPlace eDiscovery &
Hold feature and the eDiscovery Center across Exchange Server 2013, SharePoint Server 2013, and Lync
Server 2013 that address pre-processing stages of E-discovery, including information management,
identification, preservation, and collection.
87
DATA LOSS PREVENTION: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/jj150527(v=exchg.150).aspx
88
MESSAGING POLICY AND COMPLIANCE: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/aa998599(v=exchg.150).aspx
GARTNER SAYS E-DISCOVERY SOFTWARE MARKETPLACE IS SET TO CONTINUE HIGH-GROWTH PACE:
http://www.gartner.com/it/page.jsp?id=1257113
89
101 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Note
For more information, see the Electronic Discovery Reference Model (EDRM)90, a set of guidelines and
processes for conducting eDiscovery for customers and providers, and was developed by a group of industry
experts in a number of working projects. EDRM focuses on reducing the cost and complexity of eDiscovery through
the development of standards such as EDRM XML to attempt to provide a clear and repeatable process.
Thanks to this solution, compliance officers can perform the discovery process in-place; data is not
duplicated into separate repositories. As such, tools operate on data where it lives, and preserve minimum
amount of data needed. Since content is held in-place, teams can respond quickly by accessing data in its
native format (without any loss of fidelity often associated with copying data to separate archives). Then,
teams have an easy way to package the result by exporting it according to the EDRM XML specification so
that it can be imported for example into a review tool.
In order to be able to decrypt any rights protected content within an organization, compliance officers must
be added as super user in Azure Rights Management service.
Such a capability resonates with the site mailbox, another new feature of Exchange Server 2013. A site
mailbox is a shared inbox in Exchange Server 2013 that all the members of a SharePoint Server 2013 site, i.e.
the individuals listed in the Owners and Members groups of the site (security groups or distribution lists are
not supported) can access. It’s accessible from the site in which it is created. The e-mail address of the site
mailbox is generated automatically from the name of the site.
With site mailboxes, Exchange Server 2013 works with SharePoint Server 2013 to give users more ways to
collaborate while keeping data safe.
To support such an integrated scenario, the servers must be able to request resources from each other in a
secure way. This leverages the Server-to-server authentication, a new feature of Exchange Server 2013,
90
Electronic Discovery Reference Model: http://www.edrm.net/
102 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
SharePoint Server 2013, and Lync Server 2013 that allows a server to request resources of another server on
behalf of a user. This feature uses the industry standard Open Authorization (OAuth) 2.0 protocol (see
Section § CONFIGURING INTEGRATION BETWEEN EX1, LYNC1, AND SP1).
Beyond the site itself, site mailboxes are surfaced in Outlook 2013 and give you easy access to the email and
documents for the projects you care about. It's listed in the Folder Explorer in Outlook 2013, letting you file
emails or documents into the shared project space simply by dragging the email, document, or attachment
into the site mailbox. (Site mailboxes are not available in Outlook Web App (OWA))
Users view site mailbox emails just as they would any other Exchange message, while SharePoint Server 2013
enables versioning and coauthoring of documents.
Note
For more information, see the blog post SITE MAILBOXES IN THE NEW OFFICE91.
In the context of this paper, site mailboxes can be searched using the Exchange eDiscovery Center where
the built-in eDiscovery functionality makes it easy to find needed information across held, archived, and
current e-mail messages. As a consequence, e-mail messages and documents stored in site mailboxes can
be put on legal hold. Additionally, site mailboxes adhere to the lifecycle policies applied to the SharePoint
Server 2013 site with which they are associated, enabling automated retention and archiving of the entire
site mailbox. Site mailboxes allow users to naturally work together – while compliance policies are applied
behind the scenes.
In tandem with SharePoint Server 2013, organizations can search e-mail message, instant messages,
calendars, and contacts, as well as SharePoint documents, sites, file shares, blogs, wikis, and more, all from
the eDiscovery Center.
91
SITE MAILBOXES IN THE NEW OFFICE: http://blogs.technet.com/b/exchange/archive/2012/08/22/site-mailboxes-in-the-new-office.aspx
103 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Configuring SharePoint Server 2013 to use the Rights
Management connector
Starting with SharePoint Server 2010, a SharePoint server includes IRM feature support using AD RMS.
Note
For additional information, see the Microsoft TechNet articles PLAN INFORMATION RIGHTS MANAGEMENT
(SHAREPOINT SERVER 2010)92 and CONFIGURE INFORMATION RIGHTS MANAGEMENT (SHAREPOINT SERVER 2010)93.
This section describes how to configure the SP1 SharePoint server with the Rights Management connector
deployed on the EDGE1 computer to benefit from the Azure Rights Management service protection and
how to enable and use IRM settings on the SharePoint document library of the deployed Contoso
Corporation Team Site at http://sp1/.
Installing the MSIPC 2.1 client
As previously noticed, a SharePoint server must be running the latest version of the MSIPC client 2.1.
To install the MSIPC client 2.1 on the SP1 machine, proceed with the following steps:
1.
Log on as the domain administrator CORP-CONTOSO\User1 on the EDGE1 computer.
2.
Open a browser session and navigate to the following link: Active Directory Rights Management
Services SDK 2.194 and click Download.
3.
In the Choose the download you want page, check Setup_sdk_x64.exe and click Next.
4.
Click Save.
5.
Copy the downloaded file Setup_sdk_x64.exe to \\SP1\C$.
6.
Now log on as the domain administrator CORP-CONTOSO\User1 on the SP1 computer and from a
Windows Explorer windows, double-click the copied file Setup_sdk_x64.exe. A User Account Control
dialog opens up.
PLAN INFORMATION RIGHTS MANAGEMENT (SHAREPOINT SERVER 2010): http://technet.microsoft.com/enus/library/hh545608(v=office.14).aspx
92
CONFIGURE INFORMATION RIGHTS MANAGEMENT (SHAREPOINT SERVER 2010): http://technet.microsoft.com/enus/library/hh545607(v=office.14).aspx
93
94
Active Directory Rights Management Services SDK 2.1: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=38397
104 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
7.
Click Yes. The Active Directory Rights Management Services SDK 2.1 Setup wizard opens up.
8.
Click Next.
9.
On the End-User License Agreement page, select I accept the terms in the License Agreement
and click Install.
105 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
10. On the Destination Folder page, keep the default folder and click Next.
11. Click Install.
12. Once completed, click Finish. This launches the Active Directory Rights Management Services
Client 2.1 Setup wizard.
13. Click Next.
106 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
14. On the End-User License Agreement page, select I accept the terms in the License Agreement
and then click Next.
15. Select I don’t want to use Microsoft Update since the SP1 machine in the test lab environment
doesn’t have Internet connectivity. This setting isn’t recommended for a production environment.
Click Next.
16. Click Install.
107 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
17. Once completed, click Finish.
The right version of MSIPC.dll (under C:\Program Files\Active Directory Management Services Client 2.1)
should show, in the msipc.dll Properties dialog, version 1.0.622.34:
To finalize the setup, considering both our Azure Rights Management service configuration and the current
setup of the Rights Management connector on EDGE1, the following registry key must be must be set on
SP1 to configure SharePoint Server to use the Azure Rights Management service, but redirect it to talk
through the Rights Management connector whenever is has to communicate with the Azure Rights
Management service:
HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\MSIPC\ServiceLocation\LicensingRedirection
REG_SZ: "https://3599e415-dcde-4c14-ba31-765d543c5f25.rms.eu.aadrm.com/_wmcs/licensing"="http://edge1.corpcontoso.com/_wmcs/licensing"
Note
As per Section § ENABLING IRM CAPABILITIES ON EXCHANGE SERVER
108 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
, our organization’s Azure Rights Management service URL is in our configuration 3599e415-dcde-4c14-ba31765d543c5f25.rms.eu.aadrm.com. This value serves for the configuration of the second registry setting on SP1 to configure
SharePoint Server to use Azure Rights Management service, but redirect it to talk through the Rights Management connector
whenever is has to communicate with the Azure Rights Management service. As already outlined, and beyond the GUID that
relates to our tenant, for regions outside the European Union, .eu. will be replaced in the above Urls by .na. for North America,
or .ap. for Asia
To manually set these registry settings, proceed with the following steps:
1.
On SP1, open an elevated Windows PowerShell command prompt, and, at the command prompt,
run the following command to create the registry above setting:
PS C:\Windows\system32>REG ADD HKLM\SOFTWARE\Microsoft\MSIPC\ServiceLocation\LicensingRedirection /v https://3599e415dcde-4c14-ba31-765d543c5f25.rms.eu.aadrm.com/_wmcs/licensing /d "http://edge1.corp-contoso.com/_wmcs/licensing"
The operation completed successfully.
PS C:\Windows\system32>
2.
Close the Windows PowerShell command prompt.
To set these registry settings with the RMS connector Configuration tool, proceed with the following steps:
1.
On SP1, open an elevated Windows PowerShell command prompt, and, navigate to the folder where
the RMS Connector configuration tool has been download, for example “C:\RMS connector server
configuration tool” in our configuration.
2.
Run the following command to set the SharePoint Server 2013 configuration:
PS C:\RMS connector server configuration tool> .\GenConnectorConfig.ps1 –ConnectorUri http://edge1-corp-contoso.com –
SetSharePoint2013
PS C:\RMS connector server configuration tool>
3.
Close the Windows PowerShell command prompt.
Enabling IRM capabilities on SharePoint Server 2013
To enable the SP1 SharePoint server to use the Azure Rights Management service via the Rights
Management connector, proceed with the following steps:
1.
Press the WINDOWS key. From the Start screen, click SharePoint 2013 Central Administration.
2.
A User Account Control dialog appears. Click Yes.
3.
Click Security under Central Administration on the left side.
109 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
4.
In the Security page, click Configure information rights management under Information policy.
5.
In the Information Rights Management page, select Use this RMS server, type ”http://edge1.corpcontoso.com” in the corresponding box, and then click OK. You should come back to the Security
page.
Once IRM enabled, the related Xrml licenses and certificated are located under C:\Users\All
Users\Microsoft\MSIPC\Server.
After IRM is enabled for the SharePoint server, IRM settings can be applied on SharePoint document libraries.
Settings on libraries are a superset of the capabilities that were available in SharePoint 2010 especially
around granular control on the usage rights and introduction of group protection.
Group protection feature provide library owners the ability to specify an e-mail-enabled group who can
protect the documents downloaded from the library. This enables collaboration scenarios out-of-SharePoint
for members of a given distribution group.
In addition, rights managed document libraries provide read-only Web access support and provide
collaboration scenarios across organizations (tenants).
110 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
To configure IRM settings on the SharePoint document library of the Contoso Corporation Team Site at
http://sp1/, proceed with the following steps:
1.
Open a browser session and navigate to http://sp1/. The Contoso Corporation Team Site shows up.
2.
Click Documents.
3.
From the document library page, click the LIBRARY tab.
4.
Click Settings.
111 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
5.
Click Information Rights Management and configure the document library for rights management
as illustrated in the next step.
6.
In the Information Rights Management Settings page, configure IRM settings to enforce the IRMProtection on documents when downloading them.
a.
Click Restrict permissions on this library on download,
b. Enter a permissions policy title, for example “Contoso FTE Policy”.
c.
Enter a permission policy description, for example “Applies to all Contoso FTE”.
d. And then click SHOW OPTIONS.
Clicking SHOW OPTIONS will show the rest of the setting fields, which includes all advanced
settings as illustrated hereafter.
112 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
As far as the latter is concerned, library administrators can check the Prevent opening documents
in the browser for this document library box to prevent Office Web Apps from showing the
content.
Furthermore, whenever a document is downloaded from a rights managed document library, by
default each supported file type is encrypted and rights are restricted to the authenticated user who
downloaded the documents. Other users who have rights to the same library must get their own
copy.
The Allow group protection box enables to protect, as its name indicates, a library for a group.
Library administrators can specify an Active Directory e-mail-enabled group and use it to stamp the
usage license for the file. Then, documents that are downloaded can be used by all the members of
the group, and the user who downloaded the copy can transfer the copy to any member of the
group directly.
7.
Set the above appropriate settings, and then click OK.
Testing IRM capabilities with the Rights Management connector
Updating CLIENT1 and CLIENT2
Before testing the IRM configuration, both CLIENT1 and CLIENT2 need to be updated.
On CLIENT1, proceed with the following steps:
1.
Log on as the domain administrator CORP-CONTOSO\User1
2.
Install the Microsoft Online Services Sign-In Assistant (MOS SIA) 7.0:
a.
95
Open a browser session and navigate to the following link: Microsoft Online Services SignIn Assistant for IT Professionals RTW 95 and click Download.
Microsoft Online Services Sign-In Assistant for IT Professionals RTW: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=286152
113 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
b. In the Choose the download you want page, check msoidcli_32bit.msi and click Next.
c.
3.
Click Run. The Microsoft Online Services Sign-in Assistant Setup wizard opens. Follow
the instructions to complete the installation as previously illustrated.
Install the MSIPC client 2.1:
a.
From a browser session, navigate to the following link: Active Directory Rights Management
Services SDK 2.196 and click Download. In the Choose the download you want page, check
Setup_sdk_x86.exe and click Next.
b. Click Run. The Active Directory Rights Management Services SDK 2.1 Setup wizard
opens up. Follow the instructions to complete the installation as previously illustrated.
c.
4.
The right version of MSIPC.dll (under C:\Program Files\Active Directory Management Services
Client 2.1) should show, in the msipc.dll Properties dialog, version 1.0.622.34:
Open an command prompt and type the following command:
C:\Users\User1.CORP-CONTOSO> Copy \\EDGE1\C$\ADFSSelfSigned.cer .\Desktop
5.
96
From the desktop, double-click the file ADFSSelfSigned.cer. An Open File – Security Warning dialog
pops up.
Active Directory Rights Management Services SDK 2.1: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=38397
114 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
6.
Click Open. A Certificate dialog appears.
7.
Click Install Certificate… A Certificate Import Wizard dialog appears.
8.
Select Local Machine and click Next. An User Account Control dialog pops up.
115 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
9.
Click Yes.
10. Select Place all certificates in the following store and click Browse... A Select Certificate Store
dialog pops up.
11. Select Trusted Root Certificate Authorities and click OK.
12. Click Next.
116 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
13. Click Finish. A Certificate Import Wizard dialog pops up.
14. Click OK twice.
15. Sign out.
16. Repeat all the above steps on CLIENT2.
Configuring Office Professional 2013 on CLIENT1 and CLIENT2
On CLIENT1, proceed with the following steps:
1.
Log on as the user CORP-CONTOSO\Chris.
2.
Launch Outlook 2013. When this is the first Outlook 2013 is launched on the local computer, the
Welcome to Microsoft Outlook 2013 wizard starts and you will be prompted to setup an e-mail
account. In that case, you can proceed with that wizard and configure the Exchange e-mail settings
to use Exchange Server 2013 in our test lab with the mailbox enabled user CORP-CONTOSO\Chris.
3.
Click Next.
117 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
4.
Ensure Yes is selected and click Next.
5.
In the Auto Account Setup page, the mailbox enabled user information should be automatically
retrieved. Outlook 2013 is performing a configuration query against the Exchange Server 2013
environment - the proper auto discover DNS record is in place for the CORP-CONTOSO domain to find the e-mail server setting for that user’s mailbox. Click Next.
118 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
6.
Click Finish. Outlook 2013 launches.
7.
Select Ask me later and click Accept.
8.
From Outlook 2013, click New Email. A new e-mail window appears. Select the OPTIONS tab in the
Office Ribbon, click Permission and then Connect to Rights Management Servers and get
templates.
9.
A Microsoft Outlook dialog pops up. The very first time you use the IRM feature, Outlook contacts
the Azure Rights Management service to finalize the configuration. the “Do Not Forward”, “Company
– Confidential” and “Company – Confidential View Only” templates aren’t available until the initial
Office IRM client configuration has been completed.
Once the environment is properly configured, the “Do Not Forward”, “Company – Confidential” and
“Company – Confidential View Only” templates should appears under Permission.
10. Close the e-mail window and close Outlook 2013. At this stage, the IRM feature is fully configured
to work with the Azure Rights Management service.
11. Sign out.
12. Repeat all the above steps whilst being connected as CORP-CONTOSO\Janet.
119 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
You can now test the IRM feature with EX1 and SP1 from a user experience perspective.
Note
FEATURES
For additional information, please refer to Section § CONFIGURING AND USING OFFICE 365 PROPLUS IRM
in the whitepaper INFORMATION PROTECTION AND CONTROL (IPC) IN OFFICE 365 WITH AZURE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT
SERVICE97.
Testing SharePoint rights managed document libraries
In order to test the SharePoint rights managed document library settings, you can go back to the document
library, add a new Word document to the library. You can do that for instance from the CLIENT1 machine
logged as CORP-CONTOSO\Chris.
On the CLIENT2, log on as CORP-CONTOSO\Janet. You can then try opening this Word document and verify
that the IRM-Protection has properly been applied to the content upon download in Word 2013.
An Active Directory Rights Management Services dialog opens up.
Click OK to continue. The document should now open in Word 2013.
INFORMATION PROTECTION AND CONTROL (IPC) IN OFFICE 365 WITH MICROSOFT RIGHTS MANAGEMENT SERVICE: http://www.microsoft.com/enus/download/details.aspx?id=34768
97
120 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Click View Permission…
Click OK.
Leveraging the support for PDF in addition to Office formats
SharePoint Server 2013 supports IRM protection of PDF documents. Such a support leverages a Microsoft
extension to the existing ISO 32000 international standard 98, which is based on the Portable Document
Format (PDF), version 1.7 developed by Adobe standard99.
The extension allows PDF documents to be encrypted by Azure Rights Management service.
In the context of this paper, with such a support, users can upload PDF documents to SharePoint rights
managed document libraries (see previous section), and upon download, the files will be protected using
Microsoft Office IRM along with Azure Rights Management service via the Rights Management connector.
To use PDF files in libraries that the owner has protected with IRM, the user will need a PDF compatible
readers as listed in the article SHAREPOINT-COMPATIBLE PDF READERS THAT SUPPORT MICROSOFT INFORMATION RIGHTS
MANAGEMENT SERVICES100.
ISO 32000-1, DOCUMENT MANAGEMENT – PORTABLE DOCUMENT FORMAT – PART 1: PDF 1.7:
http://www.iso.org/iso/home/store/catalogue_ics/catalogue_detail_ics.htm?csnumber=51502
98
99
PDF Reference and Adobe Extensions to the PDF Specification: http://www.adobe.com/devnet/pdf/pdf_reference.html
SHAREPOINT-COMPATIBLE PDF READERS THAT SUPPORT MICROSOFT INFORMATION RIGHTS MANAGEMENT SERVICES:
http://office.microsoft.com/en-us/sharepoint-help/sharepoint-compatible-pdf-readers-that-support-microsoft-information-rightsmanagement-services-HA102925502.aspx
100
121 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Without a compatible PDF reader that implements the extension, the user experience will be as follows when
viewing a protected PDF:
As you can see, the user will be invited to download a compatible PDF reader. In terms of compatible PDF
readers, one can use for instance the Foxit Enterprise Reader with the RMS PDF Plug-in Module101.
This reader leverages the functionalities exposed by the MSIPC Client 2.1. These components result from a
major effort to reduce complexity, to streamline the development process of IPC-enlightened applications
and solutions, to handle documents of different file types (Office documents, PDF, text, image and others),
and to be able to quickly protect and unprotect documents.
From that point, an IRM-protected PDF document is rendered as expected along with the permission
information from the SharePoint rights managed document library:
Click Change Permission… to see the granted permissions. A Permission dialog opens up.
101
Foxit Enterprise Reader with the RMS Plug-in Module: http://www.foxitsoftware.com/landingpage/2012/07/Reader-Ads-RMS/
122 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
The Foxit Enterprise Reader provides tight integration into SharePoint 2013 service to enable instant viewing
and collaboration.
This concludes this chapter devoted to the test and the evaluation of the Rights Management connector.
123 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Administering the Rights Management
connector
Monitoring the Rights Management connector
The Rights Management connector exposes a set of performance counters that can be leveraged to monitor
its activities.
The following table lists the performance counters that are typically used for troubleshooting.
Table 1: Key Rights Management connector’s performance counters
Performance Counter
Description
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\Authorization Failure
Total individual servers unable to connect through this node
due to not finding a match for the requesting service
account in the authorization table
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\Authorization policy download failures
Total number of failed attempts to download the
authorization table
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\Authorization Success (group name):
Total individual servers successfully authenticating to this
connector node and for which a match has been found in
the authorization table for this group (also includes a _total
instance)
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\Authorization Success Rate (group)
Number of individual servers successfully authenticating to
this connector node and for which a match has been found
in the authorization table for this group per second (also
includes a _total instance)
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\Certification Failed Requests
Total number of Successful single licensing requests
124 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Performance Counter
Description
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\Certification Failed Requests Rate
Current rate of failed single licensing requests being
performed per second
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\Certification Successful Requests
Total number of Successful single licensing requests
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\Certification Successful Requests Rate
Current rate of failed single licensing requests being
performed per second
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\Licensing Failed Batched Requests
Total number of failed batched licensing requests
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\Licensing Failed Batched Requests Rate
Current rate of failed batched licensing requests being
performed per second
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\Licensing Failed Single Requests
Current rate of failed single licensing requests being
performed per second
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\Licensing Failed Single Requests Rate
Total number of failed single licensing requests
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\Licensing Successful Batched Requests
Current rate of Successful batched licensing requests being
performed per second
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\Licensing Successful Batched Request
Average Connector Processing Time
Current average connector processing time of successful
batched licensing requests, which is the difference between
the two previous performance counters
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\Licensing Successful Batched Request
Average Connector Response Time
Current average connector response time of successful
batched licensing requests, from the time the request is
received until a response is returned to the caller
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\Licensing Successful Batched Request
Average Service Response Time
Current average processing time of successful batched
licensing requests by the service from the time a request is
sent to the service until a response is received
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\Licensing Successful Batched Requests
Rate
Total number of successful batched licensing requests
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\Licensing Successful Single Request
Average Connector Processing Time
Current average connector processing time of successful
batched licensing requests, which is the difference between
the two previous performance counters
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\Licensing Successful Single Request
Average Connector Response Time
Current average connector response time of successful
batched licensing requests, from the time the request is
received until a response is returned to the caller
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\Licensing Successful Single Request
Average Service Response Time
Current average processing time of successful batched
licensing requests by the service from the time a request is
sent to the service until a response is received
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\Licensing Successful Single Requests
Total number of Successful single licensing requests
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\Licensing Successful Single Requests
Rate
Current rate of Successful single licensing requests being
performed per second
125 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
Performance Counter
Description
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\PreLicensing Successful Requests
Total number of successful pre-licensing requests
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\PreLicensing Successful Requests Rate
Current rate of successful pre-licensing requests being
performed per second
Microsoft Rights Management
connector\PreLicensing Failed Requests
Total number of failed pre-licensing requests
Microsoft Rights Management connector\Time
since last authorization policy update
Time (in seconds) since the last successful download of the
authorization table
Enabling tracing the Rights Management connector
For more difficult to diagnose scenarios, you may want to utilize DebugView to capture internal traces of
the product as it responds to server requests.
You can download DebugView from the Windows Sysinternals downloads102.
To enable tracing in the Rights Management connector, you need to modify the web.config file for the
Default site in IIS. The file contains the following line:
<trace enabled="false" requestLimit="10" pageOutput="false" traceMode="SortByTime" localOnly="true"/>
Which needs to be replaced with:
<trace enabled="true" requestLimit="10" pageOutput="false" traceMode="SortByTime" localOnly="true"/>
After this, you will need to stop and start IIS to activate tracing with the iisreset command. To disable tracing
just reverse this change.
Getting usage logs from the Azure Rights Management service
You can configure the Azure Rights Management service to generate and give you a log of every request
that Azure Rights Management service fulfils for your tenant through notably the Rights Management
connector, as soon as it happens.
This information is very useful for a variety of reasons:

Analyzing for business insight. The Azure Rights Management service writes logs in W3C Extended
Log (Weblog) format103 into a Windows Azure storage account104 that you provide for this purpose.
102
DebugView v4.81: http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkID=309277
103
W3C EXTENDED LOG FILE FORMAT: http://www.w3.org/TR/WD-logfile.html
104
STORAGE: http://www.windowsazure.com/en-us/documentation/services/storage
126 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
You can then feed the logs into a repository of your choice (database, OLAP, Map/Reduce, etc.) in
order to analyze and report.
Examples of insight you can gain are: who is accessing your RMS-protected assets, what are they
accessing, from what devices, from where, are they getting a satisfactory experience, who all has
read a given document etc.

Monitoring for abuse. The Azure Rights Management service shares logs with you in near-realtime
(99.9% of logs available to you within 15 minutes of the action). This allows you to continuously
monitor usage of your Azure Rights Management service’s assets.
You know your employees best and are uniquely qualified to identify an abuse pattern. As an
example, your administrators may want to be alerted if there is a spike in accesses to your assets
during off hours (insider trying to steal a bunch of documents?), or if the same user accesses from
two different IP addresses within 15 minutes (potential password compromise?).

Performing Forensics. When there is an information leak, the top two questions are:
1.
Who recently accessed the specific document that leaked?
2.
What information did a specific suspect access recently?
With the Azure Rights Management service’s architecture, your documents can flow any way you
want (email, cloud storage such as Dropbox, USB, etc.) but recipients must get a license from the
Azure Rights Management service to open and consume those documents. Therefore the Azure
Rights Management service’s logs are a definitive source of information for forensics, as long as
your assets are protected with the Azure Rights Management service.
To turn on logging and get these logs, follow the instructions outlined in the whitepaper GET USAGE LOGS
FROM AZURE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT105 available on the Microsoft Download Center.
This concludes this paper.
105
GET USAGE LOGS FROM AZURE RIGHTS MANAGEMENT: http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/details.aspx?id=40333
127 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
The information contained in this document represents the current view of Microsoft Corporation on the
issues discussed as of the date of publication. Because Microsoft must respond to changing market conditions,
it should not be interpreted to be a commitment on the part of Microsoft, and Microsoft cannot guarantee the
accuracy of any information presented after the date of publication.
This white paper is for informational purposes only. Microsoft makes no warranties, express or implied, in this
document.
Complying with all applicable copyright laws is the responsibility of the user. Without limiting the rights under
copyright, no part of this document may be reproduced, stored in, or introduced into a retrieval system, or
transmitted in any form or by any means (electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise), or
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128 Leverage the Rights Management Connector for your premises
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