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Marine Ecology
MAR 295
Prof. Pamela A. Lynch
Introduction
•5 Oceans
•This course and the “Scientific Method”
•Early findings on Oceanography
…I think I can…
Fig. 2.1
Fig. 2.2
Fig. 1.10 M An equatorial view of the world ocean.
A Different View of the
Ocean Floor
• Fig. 1.5 (M) The major plates of the earth's crusts.
Courtesy of Reto Stockli, NASA Earth Observatory
The Changing Marine Environment
Fig. 1.3 A summary of some biological and physical milestones in the early development of
life on Earth. The blue curve represents the relative diversity of life; the orange curve
represents the oxygen concentration of the atmosphere. Several of the terms used here
are defined in Chapter 2.
The Scientific
Method
-Used to help you “see” while you understand…
-Are these organisms different to you? (why?)
Fig. 1.17
Fig. 1.18
Fig. 1.19
Fig. 1.20
Fig. 1.21
How does this apply
to MARINE ECOLOGY?
• How did the earth (and the oceans? and life?) form?
Origin of our Solar System (5 bya)
The Milky Way Galaxy; which contains our solar system (and planet)
Hot gas filament (from the Sun)
Outgassing (volcanism): Source of our early oceans?
Or comets (delivering surface water)?
Hydrothermal vent (mineral surface): 1st life on earth?
Bacterial fossil, 3.5 bya
Fig. 1-18, p. 16
• Now that we have thought about how the oceans may
have formed we can study them! What have we
found?
-- Soundings/Bathymetry tells us depth and topography
and what lives on the bottom of the ocean floor
-- Geology tells us about our 3 layers and density
-- there’s still so much we don’t know…
Fig. 1.5
You can look at the “surface”
Fig. 1.7
Or go MUCH deeper…
•Seeing in the Dark
– Water is nearly opaque to light, yet very transparent to
sound.
Courtesy NOAA
•
Courtesy NOAA
Fig. 1.12M A multiple-beam sonar image of the coastal margin of southern California.
Fig. 2.19
Fig. 2.3
Fig. 2.9
Fig. 2.25
Fig. 2.26
Fig. 2.27
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