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THE INDIANA PREVENTION RESOURCE
CENTER
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
GIS in Prevention
County Profiles Series, No. 3
Vermillion County, Indiana
Barbara Seitz de Martinez, PhD, MLS, CPP
The Indiana Prevention Resource Center at Indiana University is funded, in part, by a contract with the Indiana Family and Social Services
Administration, Division of Mental Health and Addiction, financially supported through HHS/Substance Abuse Mental Health Services
Administration, Center for Substance Abuse Prevention, Substance Abuse Prevention and Treatment Block Grant. The IPRC is operated
by the Department of Applied Health Science and The School of Health, Physical Education and Recreation.
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
1
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
GIS in Prevention
County Profile Series, No. 3
Vermillion County, Indiana
Barbara Seitz de Martinez, PhD, MLS, CPP
Project Staff:
Ritika Bhawal, MPH
Solomon Briggs
Kyoungsun Heo, MPA
Srinivasa Konchada
Indiana Prevention Resource Center
Opinions expressed herein are those of the authors, and not necessarily those of the Trustees of Indiana University or the Division of Mental Health and
Addiction. Indiana University accepts full Responsibility for the content of this publication. ©2005 The Trustees of Indiana University. Permission is
extended to reproduce this County Profile for non-profit educational purposes. All other rights reserved.
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
6.6 - 6.15 Archival Risk Factors
Community Risk Factors: Laws & Norms
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Introduction: Community Laws/Norms
HH Spending on Alcohol
HH Spending on Tobacco
Adult Tobacco Behavior
Tobacco Production
Intensity of Inspection (TRIP)
Gambling Locations
Adult Gambling Behaviors
Hoosier Lottery Statistics
•
•
•
•
•
•
•
Crime Statistics: Introduction
Crime Indices: Main Categories
Crime Indices: Specific Crimes
FBI UCR – All Arrests
FBI UCR – Juvenile Arrests
Alcohol Related Crashes
More Alcohol Related Crashes
Community Risk Factors: Transitions & Mobility
• Net Migration (Domestic and International)
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
Introduction: Community Risk Factors
A child’s view of normal is critically impacted by the child’s environment: the sights, sounds, tastes, textures, and smells of the child’s
world: “Infants participate, from birth on, in sociocultural activities that are committed to cultural goals and values . . .” (Keller, et al.
2004) If the child grows up seeing drugs and drug use portrayed in a positive manner on local billboards and local television and modeled at
home and elsewhere in the child’s community, the presence of drugs (and hence potential availability) and use of drugs easily becomes the
child’s norm. In this circumstance logic suggests it would be “norm-al” for the child to have the expectation that later in life he or she, too,
for better or worse, may use drugs. As success tends to beget success, and good parenting practices tend to be replicated by the children
raised in that environment, so unfortunately, those who are abused are more likely to become abusers, and those raised in a climate of drug
use are more likely to become users.
The smell of cigarettes, the feel of icy beer bottles and of delicate wine glasses, song lyrics glamorizing drug use, and the over-use of overthe-counter or prescription medications to eliminate every small discomfort creates a notion of normal that impacts the child’s
expectations of human behavior, including his or her own. In some instances, it can be difficult to separate family norms and community
norms. Many factors contribute to the creation of community norms, including family traditions, public policies, and law enforcement
practices. In general, community norms will be the outcome of the beliefs and practices of all the community’s governmental, educational,
social, religious, and business enterprises.
Drug use modeling by adults in a community creates an environment that is more hospitable and encouraging of drug use by youth. This
modeling takes place within and outside of the home. Since the statistics don’t separate adults from family settings from other adults, we
have included adult behaviors with regard to drugs as a community indicator and simply mention it again in the context of family
indicators. Still, clearly, this information from a community has strong implications for family settings as well, since one could assume that
a significant number of those adults live in family settings. Each County Profile contains several maps and tables comparing the block
groups in a county for the counts and percents of adults who smoke cigarettes or cigars, drink alcohol, or gamble. Where possible,
indicator data is given in terms of per household amounts.
Heide Keller, et al., 2004 “The Bio-Culture of Parenting: Evidence from Five Cultural Communities,” Parenting: Science and Practice
4/1 (2004):25-50.
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
6.6 Household Spending on Alcohol
The following table presents per household spending on alcohol for the year for this county, the state and the
nation.
Per Household Spending on Alcohol, 2004 est. (AGS, 2005)
Vermillion
Co.
Indiana
U.S.
Consumer spending on alcoholic beverages
405
439
460
Spending on Alcohol for Consumption outside the
Home
176
188
197
Beer and ale away from home
58
62
65
Wine away from home
27
29
30
Whiskey away from home
45
48
50
Alcohol On Out-Of-Town Trips
46
49
52
Spending on Alcohol for Consumption in the Home
230
250
261
Beer and ale at home
133
145
152
Wine at home
55
60
63
Whiskey and other liquor at home
42
45
46
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
Table 6.6:
Per
Household
Spending on
Alcohol
(AGS,
Consumer
Spending
2004, 2005)
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
Map: Spending on Beer/Ale for Home
Indiana Prevention Resource Center
AGS, Consumer Spending,
2004 est., 2005
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
6.7 Household Spending on Tobacco
The following table shows per household spending on tobacco products. To give a better perspective we will
compare this figure to household spending on miscellaneous reading materials and personal insurance.
Per Household Spending on Tobacco, 2004, est. (AGS, 2005)
County
Vermillion Co.
Indiana
U.S.
393
428
443
Cigarettes
356
388
400
Other Tobacco Products
37
41
44
226
245
257
Newspapers
101
109
114
Magazines
48
52
54
Books
78
84
88
485
523
552
Per Household Spending on Tobacco Products
Per Household Spending on Misc. Reading
Personal insurance
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
Table 6.7: Per
Household
Spending on
Tobacco Products,
Miscellaneous
Reading and
Personal Insurance
(AGS, Consumer
Spending 2004,
2005)
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
6.8 Tobacco Production
Many counties in Indiana produce tobacco. Economic dependence upon tobacco influences community norms
regarding smoking. It is therefore important to take into account which counties produce tobacco, the
prevalence of production, number of farms producing tobacco, acres in tobacco production, and pounds of
tobacco harvested. If the county does not produce tobacco, the rest of this page will be empty.
Table 6.8: Tobacco Production, 2002. Source: Department of Agriculture, 2006.
http://www.nass.usda.gov/census/census02/volume1/in/st18_2_023_023.pdf
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
6.9 Youth Access to Tobacco
The IPRC is grateful to Sergeant Poindexter, State Director of the Indiana Tobacco Retailer Inspection
Program (TRIP) and to Desiree Goetze, Coordinator of TRIP at the Indiana Prevention Resource Center, and
to the staff and police officers of TRIP for all the support they have given to this project.
The IPRC has studied the TRIP data generously made available by the Indiana State Excise Police and has
created two additional statistical measurements:
1)
for the intensity of inspections (the number of inspections relative to the total number of outlets);
2)
for the number of inspections per capita for the population of youth most likely to seek access to
tobacco, (i.e., youth ages 10-17).
Intensity of inspection can be viewed as one of many possible indicators of the degree of a county’s involvement in
activities to create or maintain a community norm that youth access to tobacco is not tolerated.
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
6.9 Intensity of Inspection (TRIP)
This table presents summary information relevant to the Tobacco Retail Inspection Program (TRIP) and
tobacco access for minors. The Intensity of Inspection is one indicator of the degree of determination to
establish and maintain a social norm of “no tolerance” for the sale of tobacco to minors and youth access to
tobacco. This table also includes rankings of key variables.
TRIP Inspection Data, Vermillion Co. (using data for 2004 from IN State Excise
Police), ATC 2005
County Name
Vermillion
Indiana
Intensity of Inspection
NA
1.50
No of Inspections per 1,000 Youth, 10-17
NA
10.30
Population Age, 10-17
1,759
720,070
Total Population
16,504
6,230,346
Total No. of Tobacco Retail Outlets
15
4938
Total Inspections Completed
NA
7416
Failed Inspections
NA
981
Percent, Failed Inspections
NA
13.23%
Percent, Passed Inspections
NA
86.77%
Ranking (1-78) for % Failed Inspections
NA
Ranking (1-78) for % Passed Inspections
NA
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
Table 6.9:
Intensity of TRIP
Inspections and
Related Statistics,
Calculations for
2004 Based on
Data from the
TRIP Program
(ATC, Indiana
State Excise Police,
2005)
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
6.10 Gambling Casinos & Race Tracks
The presence of gambling establishments -- like the presence of tobacco and alcohol outlets, billboards and
other forms of advertising – provides information on community environment and, because of the
relationship between gambling and ATOD use, would appear to be an indicator of risk for ATOD problems in
a community. Below is a listing of casinos and horse-racing establishments located in this county. The rest of
the page will be blank if there are no casinos or horse-racing establishments in this county.
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
6.11a Adult Gambling Behavior
Like the modeling of smoking and drinking, gambling by adults sets a tone for youth expectations about what
it means to be an adult. This report includes maps and tables detailing gambling behaviors by persons 18 and
older. The following tables describe gambling and related leisure activities by persons ages 18 and over. Also
included is a ranking for any casino gambling.
Adult Gambling Behaviors, 2004 est. (2005) Percent of Households
County
Vermillion
Indiana
U.S.
Current Year Estimated Households
6,705
2,465,349
112,708,665
Casino Gambling (Any)
19.2
19.6
19.5
Atlantic City gambling
3.5
4.2
4.3
Las Vegas gambling
4.7
5.8
6.4
Mississippi Gulf Coast gambling
1.3
1.4
1.3
Reno gambling
1.2
1.2
1.3
Other casino gambling
10.5
9.6
8.7
49
27th of 51
Rank for Any Casino Gambling
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
Table 6.11a.1:
Adult Gambling
Behaviors
(Casino
Gambling) (MRI,
Consumer
Behavior
Lifestyle 2004,
2005)
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
Casino Gambling
Indiana Prevention Resource Center
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
Source: AGS Consumer Behavior, 2004 (2005)
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
6.11b Adult Gambling Behavior
The following table compares the percent of households which engaged in leisure activities related to gambling
(playing bingo, playing cards, and attending horseraces) in this county compared to the state and nation.
Leisure Activities, 2004 est. (2005) Percent of Households
County
Vermillion
Indiana
U.S.
6,705
2,465,349
112,708,665
Play bingo
3.3
3.5
3.7
Play cards
21.3
21.9
21.3
Attend Horse Races
2.6
3
3
Current Year Estimated
Households
Table 6.11b.2: Leisure Activities by Household (bingo, playing cards,
attending horse races) (MRI, Consumer Behavior Lifestyle 2004, 2005)
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
Playing Bingo
Indiana Prevention Resource Center
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
Source: AGS Consumer Behavior, 2004 (2005)
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
6.11c Gambling: Hoosier Lottery Sales
The following statistics show Hoosier Lottery sales by zip code for this county from the fiscal
year.
Hoosier Lottery Sales by Zip Code for Vermillion County for Fiscal Year 2004 (Hoosier Lottery)
Zip Code
City
47842
CLINTON
47847
DANA
47928
CAYUGA
47974
PERRYSVILLE
County Totals:
IN Totals:
Scratch Off
Draw
Pull-Tabs
$795,188
$403,982
$27,287
$18,204
$294,108
$155,109
$39,312
TOTAL
$1,238,482
$45,491
$37,800
($2,215)
$487,017
($2,215)
$1,114,368
$577,295
$77,112
$1,768,775
$422,608,706
$291,464,296
$18,897,312
$732,970,314
Table 6.11c: Hoosier Lottery Sales by Zip Code, Fiscal Year 2004 (Hoosier Lottery, 2005)
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
6.12 Crime Statistics: Introduction
People prefer to reside and businesses prefer to locate where they feel safe to move about, to study and to
work. Levels of criminal activity in an area constitute an environmental influence on many aspects of life.
People plan their lives taking into account levels of danger associated with activities. How late at night is it
safe to be out? on foot? by car? alone? with a group?
For a child, the nature of their environment and the behaviors of their family, friends, neighbors, classmates,
and community members strongly contribute to the child’s view of the world and of human nature, and to the
child’s expectations for his or her own future behaviors and fate. If people close to the child model criminal
behaviors or are often victims of the same, the child will likely hold expectations, including fears, of
encountering similar future circumstances.
Hence crime statistics are a useful insight into the character of a place and are important to consider in
prevention planning. A prevention program needs to be conducted in a safe place and at a time when it is safe
for people to attend. The prevention professionals planning the program could consider specific activities
designed to confront, enhance, or offer alternatives to norms and role modeling prevalent in the child’s world.
Data about crimes, arrests and convictions is not collected in any one central location in the state of Indiana
at this time.
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
6.12a Crime Indices
One of the best sources of data available for Indiana at this time is the Crime Risk database published by AGS,
who use the FBI’s Uniform Crime Report. Because the level and methods of reporting information to the FBI
vary by jurisdiction, information about specific crimes should be viewed as a general indicator rather than for
exact precision or exact comparisons.
The AGS Crime Risk Index describes the risk of various types of crime in a given geographic area (e.g., city or
state) by comparing the rate of crime in that location to the rate of crime in the nation as a whole. The crime rate
for the U.S. is set to 100 for all crimes. Hence a rate of 200 means that the risk of crime in that place is twice as
high as for the nation as a whole. (Think of these numbers not as counts of criminal incidents, but as degrees of
risk. Hence, an index of 200 means that while the risk of this crime is x per 1000 persons for the nation as a
whole, it is 2x per 1000 for the community in question). The following table shows the Crime Indices for Total
Crime, Property Crime and Personal Crime. This table shows indices for this county, compared to Indiana and
the nation.
Crime Indices, 2004 (AGS, 2005, based on FBI UCR)
County
Vermillion
Indiana
U.S.
IN Rank in US
Total Crime Index
34
93
101
30th of 51
Personal Crime Index
25
74
101
26th of 51
Property Crimes
38
110
102
27th of 51
Table 6.12a: Total Crime, Property Crime, and Personal Crime Indices, 2004. (AGS Crime Risk 2004, 2005)
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
6.12a Crime Indices -- Rankings
The following table shows the ranking of this county among Indiana’s 92 counties, and the ranking of Indiana
relative to the 50 states and the District of Columbia.
Crime Indices, 2004 (AGS, 2005, based on FBI UCR) -Rankings
Vermillion
IN Rank in US
Rank Total Crime Index
43
30th of 51
Rank Personal Crime
46
26th of 51
Rank Property Crimes
36
27th of 51
Table 6.12a: Total Crime, Property Crime, and Personal Crime Indices, 2004. (AGS Crime Risk 2004, 2005)
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
Map: Total Crime Indices
Bottom Quarter, Middle Range, Highest Quarter (above 56, above IN & over US)
Above US (7), 101.55-208
Above IN (10), 93.55-208
Top Quarter (22), 56-208
Mid Range (48), 20-56
Lowest Quarter (22), 7-20
Indiana Prevention Resource Center
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
AGS, Crime Indices
2004 (2005)
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
Map: Personal Crime Indices
Bottom Quarter; Mid Range (17-42); Top Quarter (above 42, above IN, above US)
Above US (2), 101.55-183
Above IN (6), 74.55-183
Top Quarter (22), 42-183
Mid Range (46), 17-42
Lowest Quarter (24), 7-17
Indiana Prevention Resource Center
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
AGS, Crime Indices
2004 (2005)
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
Map: Property Crime Indices
Bottom Quarter, Mid Range, Top Quarter (includes over IN & over US)
Above US (9), 101.55-194
Above IN (12), 95.55-194
Top Quarter (23), 64-194
Mid Range (46), 19-64
Lowest Quarter (23), 4-19
Indiana Prevention Resource Center
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
AGS, Crime Indices
2004 (2005)
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
6.12b Crime Indices – Specific Crimes
The following table shows the Crime Indices for specific property and personal crimes. The method is to
compare the risk in a given location to the general crime risk for the nation as a whole. We see that in the
context of the U.S., Indiana is generally safer than other places for risk of robbery, but is more dangerous
for risk of murder. See the Appendix Glossary for definitions of these crimes. This table shows indices for
this county, compared to Indiana and the nation (which is the point of comparison) and rankings comparing
this county to the other 92 counties.
Crime Indices, 2004 (AGS, 2005, based on FBI UCR)
Vermillion
Indiana
US
25
74
101
Murder Index
32
107
100
Rape Index
29
94
101
Robbery Index
8
76
101
Assault Index
44
70
101
38
110
102
Burglary Index
46
98
102
Larceny Index
42
109
102
Motor Vehicle Theft Index
22
142
101
Personal Crime Index
Property Crime Index
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
Table 6.12b:
Specific
Crimes,
Indices (AGS
Crime Risk
2004, 2005)
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
6.12b Crime Indices – Specific Crimes – Rankings
The following table shows the ranking of this county among Indiana’s 92 counties, and the ranking of
Indiana relative to the 50 states and the District of Columbia.
Crime Indices, 2004 (AGS, 2005, based on FBI UCR) -- Rankings
Vermillion
IN Rank in US
46
26th of 51
Rank Murder
46
18th of 51
Rank Rape
59
28th of 51
Rank Robbery
48
25th of 51
Rank Assault
31
29th of 51
36
27th of 51
Rank Burglary
37
21st of 51
Rank Larceny
43
24th of 51
Rank Motor Vehicle Theft
37
7th of 51
Rank Personal Crime
Rank Property Crime
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
Table 6.12b:
Specific
Crimes,
Indices (AGS
Crime Risk
2004, 2005)
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
6.13a FBI UCR: All Arrests
The following data is from the FBI Uniform Crime Report as published by the University of Virginia Library website.
Below are data for all arrests for crimes, including drug arrests, for the indicated year and rankings comparing this
county to the other 92 counties.
FBI UCR All Arrests, 2002:2005
Vermillion
0
Coverage
Alcohol-Related Arrests
FBI UCR All Arrests, 2002:2005
Sale/Manufacturing of Drugs
Vermillion
10
Marijuana Sale/Manufacture
3
Liquor Law Violation
46
Opium/Cocaine Sale/Manufacture
4
Driving Under the Influence
99
Synthetic Drug Sale/Manufacture
1
Drunkenness
36
Gambling
Drug Possession:
42
Sexual Offenses
Marijuana
30
Prostitution & Communication
1
Opium/Cocaine
6
Sex Offenses
4
Other Drug Possession
3
Other Dangerous Narcotic
1
Disorderly Conduct
12
Synthetic Drug Possession
2
Runaway Juveniles
11
Weapons Violations
4
Select Behaviors
Table 6.13a: All Arrests, including Drug Arrests, 2003 (FBI
Uniform Crime Reports, 2005, from
http://www.virginia.edu/library/FBI, September 2005).
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
0
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
6.13b FBI UCR: Juvenile Arrests
The following data is from the FBI Uniform Crime Report as published by the University of Virginia Library website.
Below are data for juvenile arrests for crimes, including drug arrests, for the indicated year and rankings comparing
this county to the other 92 counties.
Juvenile Arrests, FBI UCR, 2002 (2005)
Vermillion
Juvenile Arrests, FBI UCR, 2002 (2005)
Coverage
0
Number of Agencies in County Report Arrests
3
Total Co. Population - Agencies Reporting
Arrests
17005
Alcohol-Related Arrests:
Liquor Law Violation
14
Driving Under the Influence
1
Drunkenness
1
Drug Possession (Subtotal)
6
Marijuana Possession
5
Opium/Cocaine Possession
0
Other Drug Possession
1
Other Dangerous Non-Narcotics
0
Synthetic Narcotics Possession
0
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
Drug Abuse Sale/Manufacture
Vermillion
1
Marijuana Sale/Manufacture
0
Opium/Cocaine Sale/Manufacture
0
Synthetic Drug Sale/Manufacture
0
Drug Abuse Violations - Total
7
Gambling
0
Select Behaviors:
Disorderly Conduct
3
Runaway Juveniles
11
Sex Offenses
1
Weapons Violations
1
Table 6.13b Juvenile Arrests, including Drug Arrests, 2003 (FBI
Uniform Crime Reports, 2005, from
http://www.virginia.edu/library/FBI, September 2005).
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
6.14 Alcohol-Related Crashes
The Indiana Council on Drugged and Dangerous Driving through the Indiana Criminal Justice Institute
publishes crash data for each county. The most recent of data on drivers involved in fatal crashes by blood
alcohol content of the driver are included in the following tables:
Alcohol Related Crashes, FARS, 2004 data (2006)
County
VERMILLION
Indiana
BAC 0 (No.)
5
648
BAC 0 (%)
83
68
BAC .01-.07(No.)
0
45
BAC .01-.07(%)
0
5
BAC .08 (No.)
1
254
BAC .08 (%)
17
27
Total Alc-Related Killed (No.)
1
299
Total Alc-Related Killed (%)
17
32
Total Killed (No.)
6
947
Total Killed (%)
100
100
Table 6.14a.: Drivers Involved in Fatal Crashes by Blood Alcohol Content of the Driver, 2001 (Indiana
Criminal Justice Institute, 2003)
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws & Norms
6.14 Alcohol-Related Crashes
The Indiana Council on Drugged and Dangerous Driving through the Indiana Criminal Justice Institute
publishes crash data for each county. The following table compares figures for 1994 and 2001 for the
estimated percent of alcohol-related fatalities and drivers with BAC 0.08 or greater in fatal crashes.
Vermillion Co., Alcohol and Fatal Crash Information by Year, Gender and Age, FARS (2005)
Year
Gender
AgeCat
Fatality
Alcohol
Positive
Crash
Fatality
Alcohol
Negative
Crash
Drinking
Driver
Driver
Not
Drinking
2003
Male
Ages 18 thru 20
1
0
0.2
0.8
2003
Male
Ages 35 thru 54
2
1
2
2
2003
Male
Ages 55 thru 64
1
0
2003
Male
Ages 65 and over
0
1
0
1
Table 6.14b: Estimated Percent of Alcohol-Related Fatalities and Drivers with BAC 0.08
or Greater in Fatal Crashes, 2005 (Indiana Criminal Justice Institute) .
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
6. Risk Factors: Community Risk Factors – Laws
& Norms
Transitions
& Mobility
6.15 Net Migration
Periods of transition and frequent mobility are risk factors for substance abuse and other problems.
Examples include the period of transition from middle school to high school, and from high school to
college or work. Moving creates a period of transition and places a person at higher risk, e.g., moving
from one neighborhood to another, from place to place or from job to job, or from incarceration to life
in the community. For studies of a local neighborhood, the Department of Education web site offers
information on retention and drop-out or transfers from neighborhood schools. The IYI web site offers
data for the county on graduation rates, drop out rates, etc.
Community Risk Factors: Transitions & Migration
An excellent indicator of the “transitions and mobility” indicator is the figure for net migration. Data
for domestic and international migration from the U.S. Census Bureau is summarized in the following
table.
Net Migration, 2003 to 2004 (U.S. Census Bureau,
via STATS Indiana, 2006)
Vermillion
Indiana
Net Domestic Migration (change 2002 to 2003)
14
-3082
Net International Migration (change 2002 to 2003)
5
10841
-32
30062
Natural Increase (Births Minus Deaths )
GIS in Prevention, County Profiles, Series 3
Table 6.15: Net
Migration (U.S.
Census Bureau,
2005)
1/--страниц
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