close

Вход

Забыли?

вход по аккаунту

код для вставкиСкачать
6.17.3.G1
Daily Information 2/6 (B)
Objectives
Warm Up Agenda
1. Identify and
analyze your
values when it
comes to
spending money.
Define the 1. Warm Up review
following:
from (2/4)
2. Financial values P.P.
•Value 3. Career activity
•Goal
4. Vocab. Section 1
•Need 5. Career Project Intro
•Want 6. Bottom Line
2. Explain how
education
affects earning
potential.
© Family Economics & Financial Education – December 2005 – Enhancement Tools – Financial Values
Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
6.17.3.G1
Daily Information 2/6 (E)
Objectives
Warm Up
Agenda
1. Identify and
analyze your
values when it
comes to
spending money.
Define the
following:
1. Warm Up
2. 2 Truth, 1 Lie
3. Pre-test
4. Values Survey
4. Career activity
5. 5. Bottom Line
2. Explain how
education
affects earning
potential.
•Value
•Goal
•Need
•Want
© Family Economics & Financial Education – December 2005 – Enhancement Tools – Financial Values
Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
6.17.3.G1
Daily Information 2/6 (G)
Objectives
Warm Up Agenda
1. Identify and
analyze your
values when it
comes to
spending money.
Define the 1. Warm Up
following: 2. Pre-test
3. Values Survey
•Value 4. Career activity
•Goal
5. Syllabus (homework)
•Need 6. Bottom Line
•Want
2. Explain how
education
affects earning
potential.
© Family Economics & Financial Education – December 2005 – Enhancement Tools – Financial Values
Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
6.17.3.G1
Daily Information 2/7 (G)
Objectives
Warm Up
1. Identify and
What are
analyze your
some of the
values when it
things you can
comes to
do to increase
spending money. human capital?
2. Explain how
education
affects earning
potential.
Agenda
1. Warm Up
2. Values Survey
3. Career activity
4. Vocab.
5. Intro to Career
Project
6. Bottom Line
© Family Economics & Financial Education – December 2005 – Enhancement Tools – Financial Values
Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
6.17.3.G1
Daily Information 2/10 (A)
Objectives
Warm Up
1. Identify and Take out the
analyze your
financial
values when it
values
comes to
survey from
spending money. last class
and
2. Explain how
complete.
education
affects earning
potential.
Agenda
1. Warm Up
2. Values Survey
3. Career activity
4. Vocab.
5. Intro to Career
Project
6. Bottom Line
© Family Economics & Financial Education – December 2005 – Enhancement Tools – Financial Values
Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
6.17.3.G1
Daily Information 2/11 (A)
Objectives
Warm Up
Agenda
1. Identify and
analyze your
values when it
comes to
spending money.
Complete
the Job to
Career
activity.
1. Warm Up
2. Vocab.
3. Intro to Career
Project
4. Bottom Line
2. Explain how
education
affects earning
potential.
© Family Economics & Financial Education – December 2005 – Enhancement Tools – Financial Values
Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
6.17.3.G1
Daily Information 2/10 (B)
Objectives
Warm Up
1. Identify and
analyze your
What factors
values when it
affect your
comes to
earnings
spending money. potential?
2. Explain how
education
affects earning
potential.
Agenda
1. Warm Up
2. Financial
values P.P.
3. Career Project
Intro
4. Finish vocab.
5. Bottom Line
© Family Economics & Financial Education – December 2005 – Enhancement Tools – Financial Values
Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
6.17.3.G1
Daily Information 2/10 (E)
Objectives
Warm Up
1. Identify and Take out the
analyze your
financial
values when it
values
comes to
survey from
spending money. last class.
2. Explain how
education
affects earning
potential.
Agenda
1. Warm Up
2. Values Survey
3. Career activity
4. Vocab.
5. Intro to Career
Project
6. Bottom Line
© Family Economics & Financial Education – December 2005 – Enhancement Tools – Financial Values
Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
6.17.3.G1
Daily Information 9/8
Objectives
Warm Up
Agenda
1. Identify and
analyze your
values when it
comes to
spending money.
Define the
following:
1. Warm Up
2. Truth/Lie
3. Values Survey
5. Career activity
6. Exit Ticket
2. Explain how
education
affects earning
potential.
•Value
•Goal
•Need
•Want
© Family Economics & Financial Education – December 2005 – Enhancement Tools – Financial Values
Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
6.17.3.G1
Influences
• Value: belief or practice about what is
desirable, worthwhile, and important
• Goal: the end result or accomplishment
• Need: something thought to be necessary
• Want: something unnecessary but desired
© Family Economics & Financial Education – December 2005 – Enhancement Tools – Financial Values
Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
Financial Values
Categories
6.17.3.G1
Class Talley Sheet
Personal Value Categories
# of Students – Highest Ranking
Concern for Others
8
Measure of Success
2
Security
9
Freedom & Flexibility
14
Purchasing Power
2
Status Seeking
1
Necessity
7
© Family Economics & Financial Education – December 2005 – Enhancement Tools – Financial Values
Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
6.17.3.G1
Concern for Others
• Money can be used to help
your family and friends, to
support causes you believe
in, and to make the world a
better place for everyone.
You would not want to
choose a job that was
harmful to others or
unethical. You might
consider a job in one of the
helping professions.
© Family Economics & Financial Education – December 2005 – Enhancement Tools – Financial Values
Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
6.17.3.G1
Measure of Success
• If this was your highest
category, you think of
your salary as a report
card, the higher it is the
better you are doing.
You want to be at the
head of the class. You
may be willing to take
calculated risks if the
possibility of earnings is
great enough.
© Family Economics & Financial Education – December 2005 – Enhancement Tools – Financial Values
Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
6.17.3.G1
Security
• Those who score high in this area
think that the best thing about
money is the security it provides.
You probably wouldn’t want to
start your own business or invest
your time and money in any kind
of risky venture. You want to
make sure all of your economic
needs will be met, that you don’t
have to worry about losing your
job, your health, or your savings.
© Family Economics & Financial Education – December 2005 – Enhancement Tools – Financial Values
Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
6.17.3.G1
Freedom and Flexibility
• People who like freedom and
flexibility that money gives
them don’t like to be controlled
by others. They often find
happiness in jobs as
entrepreneurs. It is very
important for them to be in
charge of their own lives, to do
what they want to do. Displaying
your wealth is not important,
but spending extra income for
travel and household help would
be a priority.
© Family Economics & Financial Education – December 2005 – Enhancement Tools – Financial Values
Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
6.17.3.G1
Purchasing Power
• You will want to earn enough
money to buy what you want,
when you want it. It’s
important to always have the
most, the latest, and the
best of everything. If you
don’t make a salary to meet
your needs, your are in
danger of over-using your
credit card.
© Family Economics & Financial Education – December 2005 – Enhancement Tools – Financial Values
Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
6.17.3.G1
Status Seeking
• You like the recognition that
money can bring and the status
and power it can deliver. Money
is a status symbol in our
society, and people who have it
are likely to be treated well.
They have the material goods,
and also the influence
necessary to get other people
to do what they want. You
require a high paying job, or a
job that lets you associate with
wealthy people.
© Family Economics & Financial Education – December 2005 – Enhancement Tools – Financial Values
Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
6.17.3.G1
Necessity
• You can live simply
and happily with a
small, but adequate
income. You can
accept a job you like
even though it doesn’t
pay very much.
© Family Economics & Financial Education – December 2005 – Enhancement Tools – Financial Values
Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
6.17.3.G1
Human Capital
Skills acquired through a process of
self investment
• What are examples of things you can
do to increase human capital?
– Summer jobs
– Volunteer
– Extra-curricular activities
© Family Economics & Financial Education – December 2005 – Enhancement Tools – Financial Values
Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
6.17.3.G1
Education vs. Income
• Higher Education = Higher Estimated
Lifetime Earnings
“Education is essential in getting a high-paying job. In fact, for
all but 1 of the 50 highest paying occupations, a college
degree or higher is the most significant source of education
or training. Air traffic controller is the only occupation of
the 50 highest paying for which this is not the case”
© Family Economics & Financial Education – December 2005 – Enhancement Tools – Financial Values
Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
6.17.3.G1
Education vs. Income
Educational
Attainment
U.S. Average Income Percentage of U.S.
(2007)
Population (2007)
Not high school
graduate
$33, 912
15.2%
High school graduate
including GED
$46,938
25.2%
Some college no
degree
$54,881
21.8%
Associate Degree
$64,537
8.9%
Bachelor’s Degree
$88,948
18.7%
Master’s, doctoral,
professional degree
$115, 179
10.2%
© Family Economics & Financial Education – December 2005 – Enhancement Tools – Financial Values
Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
6.17.3.G1
Influences
• Values, Goals, Needs, Wants
© Family Economics & Financial Education – December 2005 – Enhancement Tools – Financial Values
Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
6.17.3.G1
What Will Affect My Income?
•
•
•
•
•
•
Choices you make now
Values and Goals
Educational Level
Cost of Training
Economy
Resume and job hunting skills
© Family Economics & Financial Education – December 2005 – Enhancement Tools – Financial Values
Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
6.17.3.G1
Career Activity
– Open the document and save as your last
name in your “H” drive
– Complete activity
– Save in your “H” drive
– Submit for a grade by doing the
following:
• File> SaveAs> Browse> Computer>
Webdesign W drive> FREY 2014
© Family Economics & Financial Education – December 2005 – Enhancement Tools – Financial Values
Funded by a grant from Take Charge America, Inc. to the Norton School of Family and Consumer Sciences at the University of Arizona
1/--страниц
Пожаловаться на содержимое документа